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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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  1. First of all, I extend my deepest condolences to the families of the two people aboard Wingnuts-it is an awful tragedy.

    ==========

    I also heard about the U-20 sinking and all of this has brought up interesting thoughts both here and on boatdesign. Some people want to blame the design of the Kiwi 35 for the deaths of the crew even though the small amount of evidence that is out now seems to show that something terrible happened to those two people that didn't happen to the others on board. Thats one thing to consider.

    Another is this: the common cure all among safety freaks in the monohull community appears to be that the Kiwi 35 was too tender, it was too likely to capsize, it needed more lead. That because of this it was "unseaworthy".

    But wait just a minute-did you see the picture of the upsidedown boat and the righted boat? Did you notice that it was floating?

    Remember the old mono vs multi argument: " Yeah the multihull will capsize but the leadbelly will sink". But the Kiwi 35 did not sink. In fact, it behaved very similarly to a multihull that had capsized. And as tragic as the loss of two lives is 6 others survived w/o injuries.

    Maybe instead of mandating that all monohulls are self-righting(which is probably a good idea in most cases) a "class" of high speed ,lightweight monohulls(of different lengths) that may capsize could be permitted as long as the boat can be shown to float after a capsize/inversion. These monohulls would have exactly the same characteristics as racing multihulls except that some of them would carry some lead-but they would not sink.And many could be designed to be rightable with action by the crew.

    And multihulls race everywhere and are considered seaworthy by most people even though they can capsize.

    Worth pondering ....

    ===============

    added 8/6/11

    I may have accidently come up with a solution to make "winged" boats safer and practical by eliminating tripping over the down wing which would also eliminate any possibilty of the thing remaining inverted while providing increased protection for the crew on deck. See the two very rough sketches posted on this date. I may build a large test model to evaluate this idea and wings in general. A friend in NZ may also pursue a test model. One thing is plainly evident: there is rampant ,uninformed speculation about the K35 and other winged boats even among naval architects. A carefully done test model could put that kind of crap to rest. Of course, if the investigation is thorough and not a rubber stamped anti-wing lynch mob maybe the model wouldn't be required. I would hope that solutions such as the one I have showed would be considered rather than just banning a whole group of high performance monohulls! We'll see...

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  3. blog-0954082001367937764.jpg20130107-214819.jpg

     

    The first i550 in Africa is now under construction. So far we have 3 boats under way and we are looking for more African builders to join in!! I have a pretty detailed blog going at Http://www.471.sailspace.org/wp or https://www.facebook.com/DontMentionWhiteElephants and really hope to see some other builders join me. South Africa is desperately short of modern boats and at only 18ft the i550 is something many of us can aspire to own.

    20130408-104248.jpg

     

  4. You know. Throughout this whole "tome" of a thread, there is a basic "something" that seems to have been missed by most of our resident experts. That "something" is the fact that this site is called "Sailing ANARCHY" and in that vein our Flying Hot Rod is more of an ANARCHIST than 90% of the rest of our gallant bunch of bullshitters. Yes, he maybe doing it wrong from our point of view but, at least he's bloody well doing it and not sitting in front of a screen thowing shit in the air between bouts of wanking at the latest peice of plastic boat porn that they'll never be able to afford. I'm not condoning HR's design / build model by any means (I actually think that it is quite hideous), but, what I do condone is the fact that he got off of his ass and had a go at making his dream come true (And I trully hope he will do so). Most of the motor mouthed bastards on here are too scared to have a bath without having the comfort zone of an EPIRB and a GPS leaning against the hot tap. WcW

     

     

    Source: 65- by 32-foot catamaran 3200sqft of living space

  5. Adriano Galliani, Milan has worked 27 years, since 1986 he became a member of Milan, one of the most important family, together with President Berlusconi,Chicago Blackhawks jersey will build into the world of Milan the most successful club. In these 25 years, Milan Galliani as Vice President and General Manager of the club, won a total of eight Serie A titles, one Italian Cup, five Italian Super Cups, five European Cups, five European Super Cups, 2 Intercontinental Cup, a World Club Cup.

    Today Zhan Ninuo restaurant, Milan Galliani club prepared a special birthday cake: a book-like red and black cake, symbolizing Mr Galliani has become an important part cheap nhl jerseys of the history of Milan; while we write blessing: Happy Birthday, Mr. Galliani! Let history continue ...

    Just Galliani, Mr. Milan today or board member Barbara Berlusconi lady's birthday. April 2011, Barbara became the Milan club's board of one, she entered the Milan club's management on behalf of the Berlusconi family's love for the Milan club will continue.

    Milan and all Milan fans again wish them a happy birthday!

    lessing Galliani happy birthday 69 years old he continues with the history of Milan

    Milan - July the 30th is an important day in Milan club,Boston Bruins jersey so we will work together to Milan Vice President and General Manager, Mr. Giuliani added Adriano send birthday wishes.

  6. Master link

     

    NORTH DESIGN SUITE SOFTWARE

     

    The North Design Suite is an integrated family of specialized software programs that brings unprecedented power and flexibility to sail and rig analysis. Each specialized program can interface with others within the suite, allowing North sail designers and engineers to virtually sail and test a boat in an infinite variety of conditions before construction. NDS significantly expands a designer's ability to test different sail and rig combinations and accurately measure results. Equally as important, NDS ignificantly reduces tuning and development time after launch. North

     

    http://www.na.norths...84/Default.aspx

     

    NORTH'S 3DL THERMO-MOLDED SAIL TECHNOLOGY

     

    In 1992, North Sails introduced 3DL®, a revolutionary sailmaking technology that thermo-molds sails as a unitary membrane on a full-sized 3-dimensional mold. Compared to a traditional sail assembled from panels of flat sailcloth, a 3DL sail stretches less for its weight, holds its shape over a wider wind range and retains its designed shape longer.

     

    http://www.na.norths...33/Default.aspx

     

    - How is 3DL Made?

    http://www.na.norths...34/Default.aspx

     

    - 3DL Manufacturing Facts

    http://www.na.norths...35/Default.aspx

     

    - 3DL Q&A... Commonly Asked Questions

    http://www.na.norths...36/Default.aspx

     

    - History of 3DL

    http://www.na.norths...37/Default.aspx

     

    - Under the 3DL Microscope

    http://www.na.norths...38/Default.aspx

     

    - 3DL® VideoS

    http://na1.northsail..._function=flash

     

    TECHNOLOGY VIDEOS

     

    http://www.na.norths...95/Default.aspx

    http://www.na.norths...95/Default.aspx

     

     

    LAST BUT DEFINITELY NOT LEAST IS THE FAMOUS DA-WOODY TOUR OF NORTH 3DL, MINDEN, NEVADA/UTAH wink.gif

    http://www.da-woody.com/3DL/3DL.html

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    For a long time - up until really recently in fact - video production in sailing operated on a very exclusive model. Filming and editing sailboat racing was so expensive compared to other activities that it took a lot of cash to get anything decent to a form viewable by anyone, and that meant sponsor and advertiser dollars galore for the most basic footage. So you'd see VCR and later DVDs offered - for free (sponsor paid) or for sale. Not a great way to get big audiences watching sailing...

     

    Over the past five years, the model has changed. The first change was the easy availability of cheap camcorders and new mounting techniques, which have allowed enthusiasts to create a mountain of raw footage. Easy editing programs have made it possible for basic cuts to be shot, produced, and uploaded in hours. This resulted in the thousands of videos - mostly crap - available on YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo, Brightcove, and the other video hosts. But the model has kicked up a notch lately, mostly due to a few new consumer-level cameras on the market, and their ability to get HD video to the screen.

     

    And while the costs to get good stuff to the browsers of sailors around the world is a fraction of what the 'old model' productions cost, there IS a cost, and producers and advertisers are finally beginning to realize what an opportunity this presents to them. There are more independent film producers around then ever - anyone with a mac and a nice camera will suffice - and advertisers, having learned that the classic marketing tools are no longer working, are desperate to adapt to the new ways that we all get our information and entertainment.

     

    So a few smart advertisers and sponsors are spending a few grand here and there to get nice clips on the web with a small amount of advertising. And it's a nice system.

    Here's a little headcam catamaran clips that shows what I mean. And something a bit more advanced.

     

    <object width="580" height="360"><param name="movie" value="

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRU7b603nQQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&border=1"></param><param'>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRU7b603nQQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&border=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRU7b603nQQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="580" height="360"></embed></object> <object width="580" height="360"><param name="movie" value="
    name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="
    type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="580" height="360"></embed></object>

    This new model seems a bit more democratic than the old one, and gives anyone access to quick, effective marketing via video rather than just the few who had an 'in' with one of the few video guys in the sport. And it gives the sailing fan more diverse content to play with.

    I like it.

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    I would like to share some photos of my restoration of my girlfriend Tina 2008-2011

    if there is anyone out there with photos of her before 2005 i would like to see them

  7. Withthe summer sailing season in the northeast rapidly approaching, it’s time tobegin thinking about your summer vacation plans. There are multiple spots to set off from inthe northeast and literally thousands of small seaside towns and harbors toexplore. With so many cruisingdestinations in New England to consider, planning a route and choosing whichlocations to visit can be somewhat overwhelming. However, if your plans are to cruise NewEngland’s major islands, you are surely in store for an unforgettableexperience. My recommendation would beto begin from Newport, RI and to plan an easterly route, allowing for theopportunities to visit Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket.

     

    Newport,RI offers several charter options across a broad range of companies andyachts. When selecting a company tocharter from and a boat for your vacation, it’s important to consider the typesof marine electronics on board. As New England is notorious for fog, it iscrucial that your boat possesses an accurate radar system as well as GPS for your trip. Once, you have made your charter selection,it’s time to begin your cruise.

     

    A10 mile sail south from Newport will bring you to Block Island, and will enablethe remainder of your trip to take advantage of the southwesterly sea breeze,which should provide for a pleasant run or reach to the other islands on youragenda. In Block Island, you may pick upa mooring or anchor in sheltered, Great Salt Pond, the island’s mainharbor. Once anchored, spend the dayexploring the Victorian Gothic buildings of the main town of New Shoreham ortake a taxi to the southern end of the island to get a glimpse of the MoheganBluffs, which offer spectacular views of the ocean and surrounding beaches.

     

    FromBlock Island, a day’s sail of approximately 40 miles east will bring you toMartha’s Vineyard, off Cape Cod’s southern shore. There are several popular anchorages andharbors on the Vineyard, each offering a different atmosphere andexperience. If you are in search of aquiet and quaint anchorage, Vineyard Haven, on the island’s northern shore maybe the spot for you. While in VineyardHaven, you can spend the day cruising the streets of Oak Bluffs or make a visitto the Vineyard Haven Yacht Club. FromOak Bluffs, a short taxi ride will bring you to the town of Menemsha, on theisland’s western shore and famous for its sunset views of the ElizabethanIslands. Edgartown is another popularovernight location on the Vineyard and is the island’s urban center. As strong currents run though Edgartown’sharbor, be sure that you have the proper anchor to keep yousecure. Edgartown offers a busy nightlife as there are several local bars and restaurants to explore.

     

    Thelast leg of your trip is a 20 to 25 mile sail across Nantucket Sound to theisland of Nantucket. Nantucket providesan extremely sheltered anchorage in its major harbor, known as GreatHarbor. If you plan on picking up amooring for your stay, be sure to call well in advance, as they are in highdemand in the summer months. While onthe island, take the time to visit the island’s two yacht clubs, Great HarborYacht Club and the Nantucket Yacht Club. You can visit the beaches on the island’s southern shore or catch thesunset in the town of Madaket on Smith Point, Nantucket’s west end. As the island is a hot spot for summertourists, the night life of Town is also not to be missed.

     

    Wherever your travels take you this summer, cruisingNew England’s major islands will truly be an unbelievable adventure. With dependable southwesterly sea breezes andcomfortable temperatures, sailing in New England is a very rewardingexperience, one which will not be forgotten for years to come.

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  9. blog-0742442001404186186.jpg

    When's the last time you waved at someone?

     

    Palm forward, all fingers extended wave.

     

    I was just reading a thread about "My motorcycle is best because...", actually it was more like," your bike sucks because..."

     

    Wah, wah, wah

     

    I've been fortunate enough to own three vehicles in my life that consistently drew waves, thumbs-ups, and smiles. I bought two of them not knowing this phenomenon exsisted. The first was a '62 bug, the second was a '86 jeep.

     

    The beetle is probably a no brainer. Everybody loves bugs. Well at least the thought or memory of a Volksie. They're so different. It dosent matter about their shortcomings, everybody waved and smiled.

     

    The CJ might catch a few people by surprise. Jeep people wave at jeep people. My old AMC was green and tan, rusty, loud and fun. We were going out one evening and hit a patch of ice from an overpass and flipped over a fire plug landing on our roof. Walked away. Had it towed to the house where after sitting for a year was pressed back into service, by chopping the top to look like a mini pickup, buying a new windshield frame, and putting the seatbelt through the door handle/pull to hold the doors shut. Good Times!

     

    The third one was exspected. Moto scooter people wave. A lot.

     

    The best one was when I was on my way home just after I bought it. A buddy of mine had demonstrated his fantasy wave technique. His wife loved him enough to ask him to get any sports car he wanted, just please don't start riding a big, fat, powerful, Barcolounger in your mid fifties. He complied and is happy. His demonstration, however, started me thinking.

     

    How would I wave? Who would I wave to? When would waving be inappropriate? Am I putting to much thought into this? When's Jepordy on?

     

    Leaving the divided four lanes of Rt119 onto the narrower two lane I looked ahead and saw rounding the corner a Goldwing, as I recall, decision time.

     

    But the die was already cast. It was as if this rider, knight of the highway, knew my dilemma.

     

    On cue, he saw me, rose from his saddle, STOOD on his pegs, and using his shoulder, elbow, and wrist WAVED!

     

    This wave reminded of leaving grandmas house, dad leaving for work, or maybe a freight train passing at a crossing. One of those waves.

     

    As he came closer he didn't stop. I could also see him smiling a just-won-the-lottery smile. My first wave. Thanks whoever you are.

     

    I wave at all motorcycles. Waved at a riding mower once (He started it). Wave at "The Company" guys, they don't wave back. Don't wave at scooters, trikes or an ekirt, that's a trike going backwards, I will return one though.

     

    My wave? Ok, I'll concede this to the silly department, but I saw a poster of Steve McQueen throwing a victory sign, palm forward, fingers down. Below the bars, bikes only. Everybody else palm forward, above the bars, Amish included.

     

    Yes it's juvenile, it's my "Waving Game". I don't care.

     

    If I wave and they don't wave back, well, maybe they're having a bad day.

     

    I'll wave harder.

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  10. When the weather got nice here last month, I decided that it was time to paint our house after 2 years of complaining about the color since we bought it. It took me a few weeks to string together enough time, but I finally have almost a whole first coat on the front & sides.

     

    The spinnaker arrived, and I did a dry fit while the mast was down, it looks great. The foot length seems perfect, and I will finalize the hoist as soon as I get the mast up.

     

    I decided to get back to the basement monday, because I am running out of time before the big race. I got in a little over an hour on monday, and the first side of the hull is done with the frst pass of sanding, and the second side is halfway done. I have sanded down all the dings and depressions in the hull until there was bare fiberglass on all sides. All the blisters starting to form were ground down to glass as well.

     

    Once I finish sanding this side, I will fill all the low areas with bondo, sand again, and then coat with West mixed with Graphite. Using the West research, I may even add some orange tempera to the epoxy which will hopefully give me a shadow tint of the original color. Tests will be performed as I get closer.

     

    No pictures, as the hull is very ugly, and looks the same as the first pictures.

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