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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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    I would like to share some photos of my restoration of my girlfriend Tina 2008-2011

    if there is anyone out there with photos of her before 2005 i would like to see them

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    Is anyone else tracking this Velux 5 Oceans Race? What's up with the total lack of media coverage? Are they trying to keep the good stuff for some later post race movie release?

    Really difficult to stay interested when the intel lags so far behind. Blog posts are great to read if you have the time, Vendee did it so much better. I don't want to dump on

    the guys racing ( after all this is solo Open 60 racing) but man this is like watching molasses on a cold winters day! I'd be pissed if I were out there hanging my ass on the line

    with no one else paying attention. IMOCA has obviously pushed this race aside in favor of the Barcelona Race. At least there's some one from our side winning the first leg as in

    kicking major butt ! Me thinks Brad is in a league of his own this time round.

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    MALTESE TASK FORCE

    02 September 2010

     

    Whilst the major noise surrounding the 2010 Rolex Middle Sea Race will resonate around Esimit Europa 2's anticipated assault on the course record, there is much more to the race than the maxi component. The Maltese participation is a crucial element in the success and popularity of the race. After watching foreign yachts secure overall victory in seven out of the eight races so far sponsored by Rolex, there is a feeling amongst the locals that it is time to redress the balance. When the 606-nautical mile race starts on 23 October, there will be a veritable posse of Maltese yachts chasing the seemingly elusive crown.One of those yachts is even named Elusive II; the weapon of choice for Arthur Podesta, a thirty-time veteran of the race, which is now approaching its 31st edition. Podesta's record is enviable. No other major 600-nm offshore course - Rolex Fastnet, Rolex Sydney-Hobart or Newport-Bermuda - can boast a participant that has competed in every race since its inception. Immensely proud of his continuing achievement, which includes being a three-time winner as crew, Podesta takes nothing for granted and is happy enough to make the start-line each year. Do not confuse that with lack of ambition. Podesta and his crew, which usually has its backbone formed by his three children - Maya, Aaron and Christoph - push as hard as anyone for the win. In 2008, they finished third overall, a mere forty-minutes off the corrected time pace.

     

    Another family affair involves the last Maltese winners and a family name synonymous with the colourful history of Malta's flagship sailing event. In 2002, John Ripard Jr and Andrew Calascione sailed Market Wizard to first overall. This year they are back again, with a neat twist as Ripard explains, "my brother-in-law Andrew Calascione and I will co-skipper Andrew's very recent acquisition Jaru, which is a J-133. We'll have with us a crew comprised almost entirely of direct family, being: my two sons, Sebastian and Thomas; Andrew's two sons, Daniel and Marc; plus, my sister Rachel's son, Luke Scicluna, and, my sister Erika's son, Sam Pizzuto. My father, John Ripard Sr [winner of the inaugural race in 1968], will have six grandchildren on the same boat!" The remaining three crew are Benji Borg, Sebastian Ripard's 49er Olympic campaign partner, John Santy from the UK and an Australian, Jordi Smith.

     

    Another local with an eye on the main prize is Jonas Diamantino embarking on his tenth race and, once again, with Comanche Raider II Gasan Mamo. Diamantino exudes optimism ahead of each race; firmly believing he has the crew and the boat should the conditions favour them. This should not be seen as making excuses ahead of game-time for a poor finish. However good the handicap system, there is always an element of chance that the weather conditions will suit one end of the fleet or the other. That is the accepted nature of long-distance yacht racing. In recent years the big boats have held the upper hand. 2008 provides the sole glimmer of hope since 2002 for the smaller yachts, when the First 40.7, Spirit of Ad Hoc, took the crown.

     

    Also in the same camp as Diamantino is Jonathon Gambin, with Ton Ton Surfside. Gambin sees nothing wrong in aiming high; seeking to test himself and his crew each time they cross the start line. Sandro Musu and Aziza have also come close to the Holy Grail, finishing fifth overall in 2004. Musu is as excited as ever heading into his seventh straight race.

     

    Kevin Dingli and Fekruna will be satisfied to make the start line after last year losing his rig just before his debut race as skipper. Caught by a truly destructive waterspout during the inshore warm-up race, Dingli thought his race was over until his friend Peter Vincenti offered up his yacht, Manana. Edward Gatt Floridia, who has tasted the glory of being onboard the first Maltese yacht to finish, is skippering Otra Vez Fexco, one of the smallest boats in the fleet, for the second time. Another member of the Ripard clan will be on Lee Satariano's J-122 Artie. Christian Ripard is a two-race winning skipper, once in 1996 and then again in 2001; coincidently, both times with J-Boats - maybe a good omen. Satariano, himself, came close to the ultimate prize in 2006, almost scooping the trophy from under the nose of the German maxi Morning Glory. Alfred Manduca and Allegra round out the Maltese roster.

     

    Sonke Stein may be German, but he is as good as a local in the eyes of many. He and his exuberant crew, which includes seven Maltese, have been a feature of the race for a number of years. Stein loves the it, most of the time, and this year is entering a new boat, coincidently a J-133 just like Ripard and Calascione, "she's named Juno and though she is registered in Hamburg, she is based in Malta. We have raced the boat a couple of times and are very happy with her performance. The crew is still a majority of Maltese, comprising my old team mixed with some others from the J-125 Strait Dealer [winning boat in 2001] crew. With experience from my earlier J-105 Oh Jee and the experience from Strait Dealer added to it we are looking forward to the race."

     

    Whatever the weather and whatever the eventual results, the Maltese crews may expect a crescendo of noise to match any surrounding their more celebrated foreign-counterparts. The crowds lining the Valletta bastions at the start and the Royal Malta Yacht Club deck at the finish will make sure of that.

     

    The Rolex Middle Sea Race commences on Saturday, 23 October 2010. Entries close on 15 October. The final prize giving is on Saturday, 30 October. George David's Rambler (USA) established the current Course Record of 47 hours 55 minutes and 3 seconds in 2007. ??For a full archive of photography, media releases and audio files covering all the key moments in the Rolex Middle Sea Race since 2003, visit www.regattanews.com

    For further information about the race and to register please contact:

    Royal Malta Yacht Club

    T. +356 2133 3109

    F. +356 2133 1131

    E. info@rmyc.org

     

    www.rolexmiddlesearace.com

     

    aa22e8d503268203b2f369c173cf683e.jpg

  1. Master link

     

    NORTH DESIGN SUITE SOFTWARE

     

    The North Design Suite is an integrated family of specialized software programs that brings unprecedented power and flexibility to sail and rig analysis. Each specialized program can interface with others within the suite, allowing North sail designers and engineers to virtually sail and test a boat in an infinite variety of conditions before construction. NDS significantly expands a designer's ability to test different sail and rig combinations and accurately measure results. Equally as important, NDS ignificantly reduces tuning and development time after launch. North

     

    http://www.na.norths...84/Default.aspx

     

    NORTH'S 3DL THERMO-MOLDED SAIL TECHNOLOGY

     

    In 1992, North Sails introduced 3DL®, a revolutionary sailmaking technology that thermo-molds sails as a unitary membrane on a full-sized 3-dimensional mold. Compared to a traditional sail assembled from panels of flat sailcloth, a 3DL sail stretches less for its weight, holds its shape over a wider wind range and retains its designed shape longer.

     

    http://www.na.norths...33/Default.aspx

     

    - How is 3DL Made?

    http://www.na.norths...34/Default.aspx

     

    - 3DL Manufacturing Facts

    http://www.na.norths...35/Default.aspx

     

    - 3DL Q&A... Commonly Asked Questions

    http://www.na.norths...36/Default.aspx

     

    - History of 3DL

    http://www.na.norths...37/Default.aspx

     

    - Under the 3DL Microscope

    http://www.na.norths...38/Default.aspx

     

    - 3DL® VideoS

    http://na1.northsail..._function=flash

     

    TECHNOLOGY VIDEOS

     

    http://www.na.norths...95/Default.aspx

    http://www.na.norths...95/Default.aspx

     

     

    LAST BUT DEFINITELY NOT LEAST IS THE FAMOUS DA-WOODY TOUR OF NORTH 3DL, MINDEN, NEVADA/UTAH wink.gif

    http://www.da-woody.com/3DL/3DL.html

  2. When the weather got nice here last month, I decided that it was time to paint our house after 2 years of complaining about the color since we bought it. It took me a few weeks to string together enough time, but I finally have almost a whole first coat on the front & sides.

     

    The spinnaker arrived, and I did a dry fit while the mast was down, it looks great. The foot length seems perfect, and I will finalize the hoist as soon as I get the mast up.

     

    I decided to get back to the basement monday, because I am running out of time before the big race. I got in a little over an hour on monday, and the first side of the hull is done with the frst pass of sanding, and the second side is halfway done. I have sanded down all the dings and depressions in the hull until there was bare fiberglass on all sides. All the blisters starting to form were ground down to glass as well.

     

    Once I finish sanding this side, I will fill all the low areas with bondo, sand again, and then coat with West mixed with Graphite. Using the West research, I may even add some orange tempera to the epoxy which will hopefully give me a shadow tint of the original color. Tests will be performed as I get closer.

     

    No pictures, as the hull is very ugly, and looks the same as the first pictures.

  3. Easter Sunday Our club has an egg hunt and Pot Luck followed by a balloon chase on the water. There should be some good photos coming. We shanghaied four V-15s and put a bunch of kids on each one. The easter Bunny (Mrs. Sockeye) spewed balloons from the Committee boat while we hopper skippers tried to intercept as many pastel orbs as possible. My team won with forty balloons because we popped 'em to keep 'em in the boat. Next post should be really about the first of the keel boat series. in the six.

  4. Withthe summer sailing season in the northeast rapidly approaching, it’s time tobegin thinking about your summer vacation plans. There are multiple spots to set off from inthe northeast and literally thousands of small seaside towns and harbors toexplore. With so many cruisingdestinations in New England to consider, planning a route and choosing whichlocations to visit can be somewhat overwhelming. However, if your plans are to cruise NewEngland’s major islands, you are surely in store for an unforgettableexperience. My recommendation would beto begin from Newport, RI and to plan an easterly route, allowing for theopportunities to visit Block Island, Martha’s Vineyard, and Nantucket.

     

    Newport,RI offers several charter options across a broad range of companies andyachts. When selecting a company tocharter from and a boat for your vacation, it’s important to consider the typesof marine electronics on board. As New England is notorious for fog, it iscrucial that your boat possesses an accurate radar system as well as GPS for your trip. Once, you have made your charter selection,it’s time to begin your cruise.

     

    A10 mile sail south from Newport will bring you to Block Island, and will enablethe remainder of your trip to take advantage of the southwesterly sea breeze,which should provide for a pleasant run or reach to the other islands on youragenda. In Block Island, you may pick upa mooring or anchor in sheltered, Great Salt Pond, the island’s mainharbor. Once anchored, spend the dayexploring the Victorian Gothic buildings of the main town of New Shoreham ortake a taxi to the southern end of the island to get a glimpse of the MoheganBluffs, which offer spectacular views of the ocean and surrounding beaches.

     

    FromBlock Island, a day’s sail of approximately 40 miles east will bring you toMartha’s Vineyard, off Cape Cod’s southern shore. There are several popular anchorages andharbors on the Vineyard, each offering a different atmosphere andexperience. If you are in search of aquiet and quaint anchorage, Vineyard Haven, on the island’s northern shore maybe the spot for you. While in VineyardHaven, you can spend the day cruising the streets of Oak Bluffs or make a visitto the Vineyard Haven Yacht Club. FromOak Bluffs, a short taxi ride will bring you to the town of Menemsha, on theisland’s western shore and famous for its sunset views of the ElizabethanIslands. Edgartown is another popularovernight location on the Vineyard and is the island’s urban center. As strong currents run though Edgartown’sharbor, be sure that you have the proper anchor to keep yousecure. Edgartown offers a busy nightlife as there are several local bars and restaurants to explore.

     

    Thelast leg of your trip is a 20 to 25 mile sail across Nantucket Sound to theisland of Nantucket. Nantucket providesan extremely sheltered anchorage in its major harbor, known as GreatHarbor. If you plan on picking up amooring for your stay, be sure to call well in advance, as they are in highdemand in the summer months. While onthe island, take the time to visit the island’s two yacht clubs, Great HarborYacht Club and the Nantucket Yacht Club. You can visit the beaches on the island’s southern shore or catch thesunset in the town of Madaket on Smith Point, Nantucket’s west end. As the island is a hot spot for summertourists, the night life of Town is also not to be missed.

     

    Wherever your travels take you this summer, cruisingNew England’s major islands will truly be an unbelievable adventure. With dependable southwesterly sea breezes andcomfortable temperatures, sailing in New England is a very rewardingexperience, one which will not be forgotten for years to come.

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    GybeSet
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    This is fun... Oh wait, I already have a blog! But I really like the new look of the forums! ohmy.gif

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    For a long time - up until really recently in fact - video production in sailing operated on a very exclusive model. Filming and editing sailboat racing was so expensive compared to other activities that it took a lot of cash to get anything decent to a form viewable by anyone, and that meant sponsor and advertiser dollars galore for the most basic footage. So you'd see VCR and later DVDs offered - for free (sponsor paid) or for sale. Not a great way to get big audiences watching sailing...

     

    Over the past five years, the model has changed. The first change was the easy availability of cheap camcorders and new mounting techniques, which have allowed enthusiasts to create a mountain of raw footage. Easy editing programs have made it possible for basic cuts to be shot, produced, and uploaded in hours. This resulted in the thousands of videos - mostly crap - available on YouTube, Facebook, Vimeo, Brightcove, and the other video hosts. But the model has kicked up a notch lately, mostly due to a few new consumer-level cameras on the market, and their ability to get HD video to the screen.

     

    And while the costs to get good stuff to the browsers of sailors around the world is a fraction of what the 'old model' productions cost, there IS a cost, and producers and advertisers are finally beginning to realize what an opportunity this presents to them. There are more independent film producers around then ever - anyone with a mac and a nice camera will suffice - and advertisers, having learned that the classic marketing tools are no longer working, are desperate to adapt to the new ways that we all get our information and entertainment.

     

    So a few smart advertisers and sponsors are spending a few grand here and there to get nice clips on the web with a small amount of advertising. And it's a nice system.

    Here's a little headcam catamaran clips that shows what I mean. And something a bit more advanced.

     

    <object width="580" height="360"><param name="movie" value="

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRU7b603nQQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&border=1"></param><param'>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRU7b603nQQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&border=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JRU7b603nQQ&hl=en_US&fs=1&rel=0&border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="580" height="360"></embed></object> <object width="580" height="360"><param name="movie" value="
    name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="
    type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="580" height="360"></embed></object>

    This new model seems a bit more democratic than the old one, and gives anyone access to quick, effective marketing via video rather than just the few who had an 'in' with one of the few video guys in the sport. And it gives the sailing fan more diverse content to play with.

    I like it.

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    This is a second blog entry test.

     

    Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in Liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.

     

    Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met here on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of it as a final resting place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this.

     

    But in a larger sense we can not dedicate - we can not consecrate - we can not hallow this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled, here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here, but can never forget what they did here.

     

    lincoln_figure.jpg

     

    It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they have, thus far, so nobly carried on. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us - that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion - that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

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