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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

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Showing most liked content since 03/24/2018 in all areas

  1. 21 points
    Hi all, First thanks to @Volodia for contacting @clean to unban me. Got kicked in January without warning or reason, probably by the Editor for reasons unknown. I missed sharing with you all the stuff that happened in the infamous leg with a MOB, mast overboard and the close call win by Bouwe who finally got his mojo back. All I have to do now is to go through 400+ posts to catch up a bit. SC, make that a "Schakel" - it's a small open boat class designed in 1961 in The Netherlands made out of multiplex. https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schakel_(zeilboot) Get me on that list! And make sure that the Editor reads it too
  2. 18 points
    We're not the important constituency right now. The MOB, the family, his teammates, the other boats. If delaying us finding out the outcome by even one minute means they can devote that minute to SAR coordination and increase his chances of being found then I'll take not finding out for a year.
  3. 17 points
    Brian has been well respected at times, and had participated in the Whitbread, managed teams, and organised races. However he has become increasingly bitter as he has become less relevant. He threatened to sue, maybe he is still trying to, his business partner from the GOC. As far as I can tell that has gone nowhere. The book he wrote about having the race stolen from him seems to have gone the same way. He is evenly balanced, having a chip on both shoulders, and seems to find verification in spouting mistimed, ill informed, badly researched, and badly written, drivel in an attempt to stay relevant. He knows full well that with a case like this there will be an official enquiry. No doubt he will try and get involved with that as he desperately clings to the yachting industry. As others have pointed out he uses his articles to show that he still counts by saying 'told you so', despite the fact that he often contradicts himself. The fact that he has used the death of a colleague, and friend, as a way of continuing his clutch on the sailing industry is frankly disgusting, and maybe slightly unhinged.
  4. 15 points
    Suggestions: Don't quote the troll. You will be quickly dealt with by Jack and/or Mad. Try to read what was written above thread before posting. Not doing so is called a Schackel. Direct all VOR related factual questions to Stief and all technical questions to Francis Vaughn. Try to sync with Jack's posting cycle. Earlier the better. Especially avoid contact at the end of a 24 hour binge. Also, avoid making lustful comments about Sophie. Use the quote tool to highlight text rather than quoting the whole, sometimes large posts. Some live in remote regions of the world with no running water or bandwidth. Give the newbies a fair shake (unless they are complete douche bags). We need more locals and boots on the ground. When posting drunk, give a heads up please. Shit fights are inevitable. The Ignore Button is your friend. Start a new thread when a topic takes a life of it's own. Some topics are frowned upon including " how wet the boats are" and Brian Handoncock. Oh, and Sophie. Some members are off limits including: Stief, Norbowgirl, Potter, Elisa, Rennmaus, JBC, Shanghai Sailor, Forss for all their much appreciated contributions. The rest can fend for themselves including myself 'who is gonna get shite for writing all this in the first place.
  5. 15 points
    From Scally FB courtesy ForrestDoggy Scallywags never give up! When you’re feeling the pain And you’re sick of the game But you’re young and you’re brave and you’re bright You pick yourself up and dust yourself down Cos it’s the carrying on that’s hard. Scallwags will continue!! Our delivery crew have arrived and we are now in a race against the clock to make the start in Brazil for the next leg. We are all hurt but we are not out!! Scallywags never ever give up!! We will make the start we will look after each other we will finish the race and do the best job we can for all Scallywags in John’s memory and honor. On behalf of all the team I would like to thank all our supporters for all the messages of support it has helped us enormously in this difficult time. Witty
  6. 14 points
    Just to give my tuppence worth on Charlie and Mark. The team used up all their reserves, and had to go cap in hand for more, in order to get the boat back on the water in Auckland. There was a flight out of the Falklands 3 hours after they hit dry land, and the next flight is a week later. They obviously realised they would need to be hitting the phones and email hard to raise new funds and sort out insurance...but they don't have either mobiles or computers with them. So I completely understand why they chose to do what they did. The rest of the crew are now in Brazil, or at home, and a delivery crew is in place. I don't see any problem with their decision making. As a crew member I would not want the teams two main fund raisers sat on an island with limited comms. Get them ashore to their address books as fast as possible.
  7. 14 points
    Vestas Some pics. New rig, as I said; stumpy, and a couple of Stanley regulars. Photos from a Facebook post by Robin C. Goodwin.
  8. 14 points
    I will begin by quoting Peter Finch from the movie Network, "I'm mad as hell, and I'm not going to take it anymore!" Take anymore of what? Simple. Mr Brian Hancock. I will put aside the appalling timing of his article and the extreme hurt he has caused to not just those close to John Fisher but the wider sailing community. I will put aside his insinuation that the crews search and rescue mission ended prematualy. I will put aside his entire viewpoint being founded solely on speculation that Mr Fisher was washed overboard, whereas it came to light yesterday, courtesy of a statement from the Scallywag team, that Mr Fisher was in fact not "washed off" the vessel, but "knocked off" by the boom. However what I won't put aside is that he keeps packaging in a guilded framework of self promotion that the sailing community should sit up and have regard for what he has to say. The experience to back this up conveinantly ignores the fact that he has never stepped foot on a VO65 and his last Southern Ocean racing outing was 30 years ago in the maxi leadmine "Fazi" that needed a snorkle. Unfortunately some of you support his utterences, such as the VO65 being "a death trap waiting to happen", and that "the management team at VOR are complicit in the death of John Fisher". So if you are one of Hancock's new deciples maybe you should also give thought to his viewpoint that tethers and Personal Floation Devices (PFD's) and by extension, intergral strobe lights and Personel Locator Beacons (PLB's) etc are detrimental to safety at sea!! That can't be right I can hear you saying, our new messiah on safety doesn't believe that. Well in his own words. "This time it’s about the use of life harnesses. Yup as you might imagine I am not really big on them. I think that they give sailors a false sense of security. I have always been a “one hand for the task, one hand for the boat” kind of guy. Knowing that you are not clipped on heightens your awareness. Makes you super sensitive to your surroundings". "Seriously, it’s time we all started to think for ourselves again. What has happened to us? Why do we all just follow along like a bunch of sheep? It’s not just pfd’s, it’s everything". It seems Hancock draws his inspiration on shipboard safety from a brother who lives in the bush in Botswana and never carries a gun even though it’s wildest Africa. His logic is you carry a gun you get careless. You know that you have a gun there to bail you out if you get in trouble. It seems without a gun and in sailings case, without a PFD and tether, your senses are heightened according to Hancock. He claims you are then very aware of your surroundings and you never take chances, relying on your senses to become honed and heightened. Maybe when his brother confronts a lion he goes about talking it to death with gobblygook like his sailing sibling? If Hancock was advocating the message "stay on board otherwise your potentially dead", no one would disagree. However to go on and effectively say if your dead why bother doning a tether and PFD in the first place because "awareness" without that gear provides greater protection! That is loonyspeak. I will leave it to you to decide where Hancock's views lie in the ongoing discussions, evolution and actions by the world sailing community to improve safety in our sport. My thinking is his views belong in a piece of his anatomy used when sitting down. References http://sailinganarchy.com/2018/03/27/extreme-anger/ http://sailinganarchy.com/2015/10/25/youre-pathetic/ http://sailinganarchy.com/2016/09/16/death-threat-anyone/ Fazi..note low freeboard and deck layout from an era that Hancock considers a safety benchmark and superior to the modern VO65.
  9. 14 points
    extreme sadness It’s been a seriously tough few days for the 65 sailors and 7 OBR’s ripping through the Southern Ocean right now in the Volvo Ocean Race. It’s cold, wet and rough (it goes without saying) but unless you have experienced it personally, it’s hard to portray the extra edge that competition gives this already tough environment. As much as we all look forward to getting ‘down south’ there isn’t one person out there who isn’t counting the hours until it’s done. That said, as tough as it has been for the fleet in general, nothing will compare to the torment that John Fisher’s family will have endured and the sadness and guilt that all his fellow crew members will be dealing with right now. We have lost a friend, but they have lost a husband, a father and a crewmate. I have spent much of the last year working alongside John, clocking up thousands of miles together, whilst battling through good and bad times both on and off the water, and he was the most supportive, amiable and steadfast friend and colleague you could wish for. Through thick and thin he propped us all up with his unwavering optimism and professionalism. Everybody’s personal story around their decision to compete in these events is different but watching him live out his dream took me back twenty-five years to when I did my first race and it saddens me beyond belief, that I won’t be able to shake his hand at the end of it. This is not the last time I will pay my respects, but for now ‘Fish’, I salute you and all you stood for, thank you for everything you did for us all and know that you will live long in all our memories …….. These situations are surrounded by emotion and most of it is natural and totally understandable, but it struck me upon reading an article on Sailing Anarchy (extreme anger) that the further removed you are from the situation, the less right you have to express it, especially when it’s not grief or sadness. Anger is the reserve of his wife, children and close family and the rest of us owe it to them to show our respect and then politely take a back seat. The very last thing I want is a ‘war of words’ but to quote the author I too “have earned the right to have an opinion” and when the time is right and in the right circumstances I will express mine. There is a huge number of unknowns around this incident, and when the crew complete the, not insignificant, task of getting themselves ashore with their minds still in one piece there will be the appropriate de-briefs and eventually we can all learn what happened and collectively make the process of ocean racing safer. This process has been going on for decades and, especially in recent years, the progress made in the overall safety of the event is considerable, despite the boats being quicker and more spectacular. I respect the author for his time at sea, much of which was in way riskier boats than we have now and before the extensive training, equipment and monitoring of the current race but I don’t think it’s right to apportion blame at this early stage especially without more detail. I strongly disagree that the boats themselves, the designers of those boats, or those that organize the race have avoided responsibility or done anything that puts sailors lives at risk. Aspects can be improved of course, but the implication that the boats are too dangerous is unfounded and the idea that anyone is complicit in John’s death is offensive to a great many of us that trust in those same boats, people and procedures when we put to sea. None of us are stupid and if the situation was as described we would be negligent in our duties to our families and that is simply not the case. The sport itself is inherently dangerous, we all acknowledge that, but we do so knowing that the equipment, procedures and, most importantly, our team mates mitigate that risk to an acceptable level and as competitors we all make a conscious decision to leave the dock. I can never quite explain why I do what I do and indeed the last 24 hours have made me think even more about those motives, but I do know that if the risk was somehow completely removed then the attraction would be gone. There will be some that don’t agree, and they are entitled to their opinions; there will be some that disagree with my view on the safety of these boats and I respect them too, but please let’s not express polarizing views on potential causes in the wake of a man’s death without being in full possession of the facts. I am not trying to push the opposite view or promote debate, and don’t particularly concern myself with the future of the but am keen that we draw proper conclusions based on evidence. There have been fatalities at sea over the course of this race, and each one is tragic and devastating in equal measure. If you look the VOR / Whitbread race four competitors lost their lives in the earlier races with three in the first race 1973 and one in 1989. Four more events and fifteen years passed until Hans Horrevoets was sadly lost approaching the UK in 2006 and now we face another tragedy twelve years on. I am not happy with that safety record and one life lost is one too many but until the right people can make the right decisions based on the facts it’s simply pointless to try and suppose what would have saved his life. The implication that it’s getting more dangerous is not supported in evidence. The deeper question is ‘why’ we choose to compete rather than how. We could have safer boats, safer routes and many other protections but at some point, it simply wouldn’t be worth doing. I don’t for a moment underestimate the significance of this tragedy and it’s truthfully shaken me to my core but it’s important to recognize that no-one is being forced to go out there and we all do it with a deep and well understood acceptance of the risk. I am not angry, I am deeply saddened, and I feel desperately sorry for his loved ones to whom I offer my sincere condolences Steve Hayles
  10. 13 points
    If someone would like to start a separate thread about John Fisher and/or about what VOR can/might/should do to avoid future similar incidents, that might be a good idea. I don't personally mind that discussion staying in the VOR Leg thread, but I also don't mind if it gets split out into a separate thread so that the original thread can refocus on the boats still racing. Very difficult to grapple with this tragedy. But I'd really like us to split out any discussion of whether Hancock is right or wrong, a knowledgeable expert or a pompous ass, etc, into a separate thread. It really bothers me that every tragedy turns into a statement from Hancock on the front page railing against everyone who coulda or shoulda done something better or differently. It's very easy in any tragedy for anyone to declare what could or should have been done differently with 20/20 hindsight, and I feel that doing it immediately and publicly while emotions still run high is in poor taste, even if you're right. It also really bothers me, specifically, that he said "but after two hours of searching in very brutal conditions they gave up". I don't have firm facts, but my impression from the facts we've obtained so far is that they searched for 7-9 hours, until dark, and then they were ordered to move on for their own safety. It was hopeless by the time they stopped, and probably had been for hours. It was probably hopeless within an hour in those conditions. But he felt entitled to declare in a statement published on a major website's front page that the MOB's crew quit after 2 hours. Then he made it somewhat about himself, which is reprehensible under the circumstances: "OK now you can have a go at me all you want. Call me Brian Handjob or Blowhard Hancock but I have earned the right to have an opinion. I have sailed those waters many times and know what it’s like when a cold, gray cresting wave comes up from behind to send you hurtling down the front of it." I've written many emails (and forum posts) where I stopped at the end and said to myself "Is this a good idea to send/post?" and then hit delete instead. That's the moment where a statement like Hancock's comes in, if you decide to proceed. You start thinking "People won't like this, I need to defend myself in advance", when the right decision is "Let me delete this, or save it to drafts, edit it later, and post something more appropriate at a more appropriate time". He chose to pre-defend himself and post. So let me ask this: - Can we please refrain from juvenile personal insults toward Mr. Hancock? That would feed directly into his pre-emptive defense. I'm hoping we can keep criticism relatively mature. (I realize that's a tall order here) - Can someone please educate me and others like me on his resume? I assume its true he's been through the southern ocean, but I hadn't heard of him before he started getting SA front page articles and associated forum thrashings. Is he a respected guru on an international board of offshore safety after having done two Vendee's and three VORs, or something like that? - Anyone have any idea why SA puts whatever he wants to say on the front page, even if he's disparaging the crew of a boat that just lost a mate and searched for hours in heinous conditions?
  11. 13 points
    Sorry but I have to call it a early night. But before I go. Hey John Fisher you now own a bit of space just south of the 50th parallel in the Southern Ocean. You will I know be keeping a watchful eye from on high over anyone who dares follow you down there and with rag up....particularly those carrying the carbon kind. Cheers mate.
  12. 12 points
    Images of MAPFRE repairs https://infosailing.photoshelter.com/gallery-image/RACING-EN-REGATA/G0000lqfd_SovwXg/I00009gn3M6rjzjg/C0000Y503PSgYSK8
  13. 12 points
    http://sailinganarchy.com/2018/03/28/extreme-sadness/ extreme sadness It’s been a seriously tough few days for the 65 sailors and 7 OBR’s ripping through the Southern Ocean right now in the Volvo Ocean Race. It’s cold, wet and rough (it goes without saying) but unless you have experienced it personally, it’s hard to portray the extra edge that competition gives this already tough environment. As much as we all look forward to getting ‘down south’ there isn’t one person out there who isn’t counting the hours until it’s done. That said, as tough as it has been for the fleet in general, nothing will compare to the torment that John Fisher’s family will have endured and the sadness and guilt that all his fellow crew members will be dealing with right now. We have lost a friend, but they have lost a husband, a father and a crewmate. I have spent much of the last year working alongside John, clocking up thousands of miles together, whilst battling through good and bad times both on and off the water, and he was the most supportive, amiable and steadfast friend and colleague you could wish for. Through thick and thin he propped us all up with his unwavering optimism and professionalism. Everybody’s personal story around their decision to compete in these events is different but watching him live out his dream took me back twenty-five years to when I did my first race and it saddens me beyond belief, that I won’t be able to shake his hand at the end of it. This is not the last time I will pay my respects, but for now ‘Fish’, I salute you and all you stood for, thank you for everything you did for us all and know that you will live long in all our memories …….. These situations are surrounded by emotion and most of it is natural and totally understandable, but it struck me upon reading an article on Sailing Anarchy (extreme anger) that the further removed you are from the situation, the less right you have to express it, especially when it’s not grief or sadness. Anger is the reserve of his wife, children and close family and the rest of us owe it to them to show our respect and then politely take a back seat. The very last thing I want is a ‘war of words’ but to quote the author I too “have earned the right to have an opinion” and when the time is right and in the right circumstances I will express mine. There is a huge number of unknowns around this incident, and when the crew complete the, not insignificant, task of getting themselves ashore with their minds still in one piece there will be the appropriate de-briefs and eventually we can all learn what happened and collectively make the process of ocean racing safer. This process has been going on for decades and, especially in recent years, the progress made in the overall safety of the event is considerable, despite the boats being quicker and more spectacular. I respect the author for his time at sea, much of which was in way riskier boats than we have now and before the extensive training, equipment and monitoring of the current race but I don’t think it’s right to apportion blame at this early stage especially without more detail. I strongly disagree that the boats themselves, the designers of those boats, or those that organize the race have avoided responsibility or done anything that puts sailors lives at risk. Aspects can be improved of course, but the implication that the boats are too dangerous is unfounded and the idea that anyone is complicit in John’s death is offensive to a great many of us that trust in those same boats, people and procedures when we put to sea. None of us are stupid and if the situation was as described we would be negligent in our duties to our families and that is simply not the case. The sport itself is inherently dangerous, we all acknowledge that, but we do so knowing that the equipment, procedures and, most importantly, our team mates mitigate that risk to an acceptable level and as competitors we all make a conscious decision to leave the dock. I can never quite explain why I do what I do and indeed the last 24 hours have made me think even more about those motives, but I do know that if the risk was somehow completely removed then the attraction would be gone. There will be some that don’t agree, and they are entitled to their opinions; there will be some that disagree with my view on the safety of these boats and I respect them too, but please let’s not express polarizing views on potential causes in the wake of a man’s death without being in full possession of the facts. I am not trying to push the opposite view or promote debate, and don’t particularly concern myself with the future of the but am keen that we draw proper conclusions based on evidence. There have been fatalities at sea over the course of this race, and each one is tragic and devastating in equal measure. If you look the VOR / Whitbread race four competitors lost their lives in the earlier races with three in the first race 1973 and one in 1989. Four more events and fifteen years passed until Hans Horrevoets was sadly lost approaching the UK in 2006 and now we face another tragedy twelve years on. I am not happy with that safety record and one life lost is one too many but until the right people can make the right decisions based on the facts it’s simply pointless to try and suppose what would have saved his life. The implication that it’s getting more dangerous is not supported in evidence. The deeper question is ‘why’ we choose to compete rather than how. We could have safer boats, safer routes and many other protections but at some point, it simply wouldn’t be worth doing. I don’t for a moment underestimate the significance of this tragedy and it’s truthfully shaken me to my core but it’s important to recognize that no-one is being forced to go out there and we all do it with a deep and well understood acceptance of the risk. I am not angry, I am deeply saddened, and I feel desperately sorry for his loved ones to whom I offer my sincere condolences Steve Hayles
  14. 12 points
    I dream about putting him on the boat when they reach Chile, and then force him to say this to their faces. In general, one should never say something about somebody if you can’t tell it to their face. And since he’s as old and experienced as Medusa, he probably will state that he lives by this rule. Of course he doesn’t. But I fantasize about seeing him do that, and then let the team show to HIS face how they feel about the way he has publicly portrayed their rescue effort. I personally want to hurt him. He has said something terrible about people I care about. Innocent people who at the moment can’t answer. I hope they get the chance to meet Hancock.
  15. 12 points
    This is so true. '99 Transpac I was overboard off the bow of the boat, attached by my tether, but no physical way I could get back on deck by myself. The crew were dealing with the kite takedown after I had tripped the tack. They had no idea that I was drowning upside down off the bow with the boat still going 10+, until they had the kite down. Then it was where's Doug? I owe my life to Alan and Davey. But, I also owe my life to that tether. If I had not been clipped to the boat, I likely would not be typing this now.
  16. 12 points
    Yes. Oh god. Why do some people on this forum think that them being updated is a high priority when things like this happens? There is a fucking search and rescue operation going on, and family members that need to be informed first.
  17. 11 points
    That was some top notch reporting by Chris Museler in the NYT. Facts that were previously unknown, hard truths about the event and yet compassion for the loss and those it impacted. Brian Hancock should take note - the difference between an actual journalist and a hack. As pointed out, the OSR calls for a spare VHF antenna. It also calls for a hand held VHF in the ditch bag. The fact that the OSR actually call for both redundancies probably reflect a longer history of this particular safety tool, and experience with failures. Sadly, most of what is in the OSR has been learned with and written in blood. But what is not covered in the OSR is in what form that back up antenna should come in, and most boats I know of (including my own) take the approach of the light weight Shakespeare unit that then gets stacked with the rest of the gear. For VHF redundancy, its not a big deal. Your antenna fails (lost, mast falls down, cable chafes through...) and you typically have plenty of time to rig that back up antenna before your really need the fixed VHF. And if you need a radio in a hurry, you have the handheld in the ditch bag. There clearly should be a 'lessons learned' run on this incident, as the OSR statues covering AIS seem to reflect the relatively short time we have been using these devices. It was only this past edition of the OSR that there was even a recommendation about using personal AIS devices for MOB, so it makes sense that the rules don't yet contemplate all possible failures nor contemplate the best possible redundancy. We have not yet shed enough blood to have been able to write the rules. The strongest solution that I can think of would be to have a redundant set up, with a VHF antenna on the rail, going to a second splitter and then to a second AIS transceiver. That way if any element of the primary system failed, you would have redundancy and it would be immediately available. No trouble shooting the system, no digging out a stowed antenna. You could even run it as a hot back up, and have the back up AIS feed your AIS capable VHF so you would be able to cross check the function of your AIS systems on the fly. In situations such as Scallywag experienced, the solution needs to be immediately on hand, or it might as well have been left on shore. I frankly am mulling over getting this set up going on Dragon, having contemplated the Scallyway incident. Its consistent with a philosophy I have adopted in the past few years. Take a look at every single thing on the boat, and consider how important is it to your safety and performance. Is it so critical that you really should have two of them? If so, carry the spare. If not, consider if you need it at all. While I am at it, a plug for what I think is the best AIS unit on the market. The AMEC Widelink B600 ClassB SOTDMA. I switched over to this one last fall and find it significantly better than the ones I have used in the past. No connection, no sponsorship... just my opinion and a strong recommendation. Again - fantastic reporting from Chris Museler. Thank you for that.
  18. 11 points
    Vestas: gearbox failure apparently. Truly is back in Stanley!
  19. 11 points
    One of the more stupid posts. Besides the inappropriate timing, it is ill conceived and thought out. Do you really think that Volvo wasn't aware that there was a chance of a fatality? Do you think it is the first fatality in the race history? Volvo, the teams, the competitors and sponsors all know that a fatality is a real possibility. over the course of a number of races, it is almost inevitable. Every single sailor in the race knows the risk, chooses to accept that risk and nobody is forcing them to take that risk. Some choose not to do the race because of the risks involved but look at the number of sailors doing it who were involved when there was last a fatality. More importantly, now is not the time to start the recriminations. Now is the time to offer our condolences and think of the people involved. RIP John Fisher. You died doing something you loved, with a group of your friends. My thoughts are with the Scally family. Terrible situation.
  20. 10 points
    Can posters please not quote random in their responses (and your responses just wind him up)? I have him on all ignore options. Thanks.
  21. 10 points
    My dear old buddy Bill Howard passed on last year. He was a proud, thorough, brilliant guy who did things like building runways for B-52s to use, designing dams, and the man could overbuild anything. In his later years his mind was failing him but he still loved to “fix up” his Columbia 9.6. It didn’t need any fixing. As his boat says BIll was senile in so many ways, and I understand cleaning it out after ten years of love administered by a senile father /grandfather would be just plain brutal for the family... I hauled it out and brought it to my shop with the understanding , “I am going to need to do this in short bursts on days when I can handle the emotions.” The family response was, and remains, “Thank you!! We simply couldn’t do it. Please take your time.” so.... Today I spent a few hours cleaning and sorting. (Realize, all this stuff is in the boat.) There are about twenty winch handles. Eight were still in new plastic display wrappers. Bill probably dropped one overboard. There were at least six new sets of dock lines. There were five -three packs of nice big bumpers..(. the ones with the blue ends) Everything having to do with preparedness, had been purchased three to five times. There are multiple rebuild kits for winches and many filters for the diesel. There are multiple sets of tapered wood plugs for pounding in through hulls should a hose break. somebody probably knows why there are forty caribiner hooks stashed all over the boat. I don’t. Many tools were there in triplicate or more. I am certain he forgot and re-bought. In fact, I had a deal with the folks at west marine to call me if he walked in so I could tell them If he already had something. But ... Bill knew about Cabellas, Academy, Sears, and various boat dealerships. Bill had a San Juan and Columbia Dealership in the seventies and at least the old guy’s at most dealerships knew him. Younger guys sold to the nice man who knew EXACTLY what he wanted. There must be forty life jackets on the boat. anyway ... before he was senile he was mechanically brilliant. As he bought this old boat in 1979 there are remnants of Bill’s very best ideas. so... I picked up an old flat green box with a faded permanent marker label. it said “Complete set of 3/8 sockets SAE and Metric up to 1” and 25mm, and a magnet on a string. Open with this side up.” so I turned it over to look. On the bottom it had bright yellow lettering, probably done with a tiny artist’s brush. ”DO NOT OPEN! THIS IS THE BOTTOM! It takes a magnet on a string and most of a six pack to retrieve all these sockets from the bilge.” I am certain that was written after all six foot six of Bill had spent an afternoon retrieving scattered sockets. He not only made sure it wouldn’t happen again, he made a plan for when it did. That Bill has been gone since the nineties. Anyway. That did me in. I quit for the day and worked on other projects. My goal is now to get the boat back to how he kept it in the eighties and nineties. I want to make it so that finding that tool box will bring a smile to his son’s face.
  22. 10 points
    So whilst trying not to take that personally, despite it seeming to be voiced that way, could you name a new sponsor directly linked to Dee since 2010? Because I would love to think that sponsors were swarming...or even there. Whilst Dee was well funded for the Vendee Globe (and many at the time said she did not deserve it) I would accept your argument that she could have performed better. Given the field that year, I actually think 6th was a good result (yes, Sam had a magnificent VG), but I can tell you categorically that finding sponsorship has been a very long hard road, and has taken up more time and money than is probably sensible. As for best result so far, I assume you are including Round the World races as the only measure for that statement? In which case, I do not think you can say 'Dee is Slow' is the deciding factor in this VOR. Sam leading SCA was significantly further back in most legs of the last VOR, but I do not think anyone would say that was her fault. If you truly think everyone entering a race is in it to win overall then you must not be a fan of Conrad in the Vendee, or many of the other entrants, or indeed many of the Whitbread entrants in the past...or SCA for that matter. I respect that you have a lot of knowledge that you bring to this forum, but we will have to disagree on your points here. I am biased, but you are badly informed on this matter.
  23. 10 points
    To quote myself: Scallywag just posted some info on their Facebook picture and text of the delivery crew: The Scallywags aren’t just a sailing team... we are a family with strong bonds who are always there for each other and look after each other, they flew to the end of the Earth at a hour's notice. They’re the delivery team! The 8 sailors, made up of some of the legends of the sea; Campbell Knox, Douglas Knox, Larry Jamerson, Matt Pearce, Peter Buckley, Peter Goldsworthy, Mary Fontes, and Willy Roberts, are leaving Puerto Montt, Chile, and are heading for the Straight of Magellan, then popping out in the Atlantic, and making a dash for Itajai. Stay safe, everyone, and thank you for everything! We’ll see you soon. More updates will follow when available.
  24. 10 points
    This leg has displayed what is so remarkable about the sport of offshore sailing and the sailing community at large, as well as the existence of just regular good people world wide. It has put on full display the closeness, despite competition, of teams when tragedy strikes such as with the death of John Fisher; the myriad skills required to race boats like these: mechanical, electrical, sail repair, etc.; the importance of team work and team cohesion; the apparent lack of fingerpointing amongst crew when things go wrong as a result of possible questionable decisions; the tough decisions a skipper or captain has to make that may not be popular with his crew (such as sailing conservatively to not put the crew or boat at risk, possibly giving up a place in the standings as a result); the upbeat attitudes, leadership and "cool heads" shown by skippers and boat captains in very stressful conditions; the assistance provided by locals such as in Port Stanley; the info provided by Little Chay. This thread it has shown the best of SA, with excellent and as up to the minute as possible actual factual information about the race (SC, JBC, Rennhauser, Stief); good dialogue amongst posters;the willingness to beat down wild speculation; the lack of mean spiritlessness (word?); boots on the ground (Little Chay again, and thanks to Fiji Bitter); insider info (NorBowGirl, Miffy); Jack at his finest; and many more. I certainly hope the race is not called before Mapre finishes, especially after all that they have gone through. That occurs up here during the Iditarod sled dog race when dog teams are way behind the rest of the teams, and it is controversial but probably less so than in the VOR as the Iditarod situation is largely done for safety (of the dogs and the mushers) reasons. Even though SHKS and Vestas are retired, it does not seem fair that so long as they finish before the start of Leg 8, that they be allowed to finish but Mapre's leg result nullified. Anyone know who is now crewing Scallywag? Vestas? I know Charlie and Mark are or were in Itajai but as for the rest of the crew...
  25. 10 points
  26. 10 points
  27. 10 points
  28. 10 points
    Sorry to post these if you've seen them. I love this shit. Watch Nicho helm.
  29. 10 points
    Here we go again. How about waiting for some solid information and FACTS before wrapping up your own little coroners inquiry?
  30. 10 points
    That is a great piece by Sam. Worth reading the whole thing which shows even with conditions as gnarly as they are there is still a sense of humour. BTW - sorry if I went off at the deep end a few posts ago but it was only minutes after being woken at (for me) an unearthly hour with the news of what was happening and many of these guys down there are friends or at the least people I know. I really feel for Witty - he is not nearly as shallow as some people have tried to paint him and I know he will hardly be able to think at right this moment. Fish wasn't just a crew member they were long, long time mates and he still has to get the other 9 souls on board out of the hell that is the current Southern Ocean. Cut him a bit of slack - at least for a while Eh! T Everyone will be so glad when they turn the corner that is Cape Horn - the whole VOR family is hurting right now SS
  31. 9 points
    "There are two novels that can change a bookish fourteen-year old's life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas Shrugged. One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real world. The other, of course, involves orcs."
  32. 9 points
    Thanks for the chart belin zeneize.
  33. 9 points
    From the print edition.
  34. 9 points
    Be great to see them back in the race, wasn’t a fan of Witt to start with. But they’ve definitely grown on me as a team to watch over the race.
  35. 9 points
    Lifted from Facebook. Photos by Simon Goodwin.
  36. 9 points
    Rest easy. I'm led to believe the RO has engaged the esteemed onboard safety firm of "Hancock & Randumb" to design and fit these over each wheel before they leave Itajai.
  37. 9 points
    Can't wait for Hancock's expert carbon critique.
  38. 9 points
    1. He died not speak to a single person on the team, the organisation, the MRCC, the safety equipment suppliers or the ANYONE involved before casting blame... But he claims to be a journalist... 2. The water over the deck was not a factor, according to the team. Read the incident report that Hancocks disgraceful report forced them to outline earlier than planned. 3. His snide comments about the team giving up searching early without having all the facts was completely out of order, and incorrect. 4. How do you know nothing is being done for the future edition? Have you seem a design since VOR binned the super 60? Or, like Hancock, have you got your facts wrong. You are right that he thinks he is fighting against wrongs that HE perceives, but he is doing it based on untruths that he has phrased to seem like truth. It is the very lowest form of clickbait journalism that is really just professional trolling, and has unfortunately led to his article being published on 3 or 4 Sailing websites who have taken his old experience to mean he is worth listening to.
  39. 9 points
    I really shouldn’t get involved but Brian Hancock really is stirring the pot – why? So much “when I were a lad” and uninformed drivel. When he was a lad and earned the right to comment (last time he did this race was 27 years ago by the way) Rothmans was doing this (see photo). And why am I getting involved? Well a sailor – and an SA newbie PM’d me with the comment “Probably more a has-been. Seeking attention” but didn’t want the usual trolling that often follows a newbie post. Let’s start at the top shall we. If the author of “Extreme Anger” was so incredibly well informed and experienced he would be as 99% sure as I am that John Fisher WAS NOT wearing a “survival suit”. These are heavy neoprene lined things you get into when the ship is sinking. It is many years ago since I climbed into one but once in, all that is visible is your face and as far as any activity is concerned – forget it, they are not for grinding, stacking, driving, they are for surviving in. More likely John was wearing a dry suit which ARE NOT survival suits, they don’t have the same thermal protection. Brian Hanckock suggests that these boats are absurd for sailing in these waters as if they are the first type of racing boat that has water rushing down the deck and are dangerous well – hello Brian - wasn’t Fasizi, the boat you did your last Whitbread in compared to a submarine? And the VO65 and the VOR70 before them which have collectively been used in the last 4 Volvos are certainly no wetter than the Rothmans crew in the shot below. (the W60’s weren’t exactly dry either).And didn’t the keel fall off one of the other boats Mr Hancock did the race on? Now that’s really safe isn’t it! (Drum lost her keel on the Fastnet - they screwed it back on and went and did the Whitbread. (Well they actually properly re-bolted it but you know what I am getting at) I could go on and on and was sorely tempted to do so but decided not to for three reasons. Firstly now is not the time for a blame game, especially from someone who last took part in the event almost 3 decades ago – if people want to come back and try it again, be part of a team, raise the sponsorship and come play. Secondly, it doesn’t really matter what any of us guess or suggest caused the MoB NONE of us know. Even the crew of Scallywag, bless them, won’t know 100%, the only person who really knows what went wrong sadly has died and we should all respect that and – yes, perhaps shut the fuck up about it, at least give them all a bit of breathing space. Finally, I have spent the last 36 hours primarily in the company (electronically and personally) with people a hell of a lot closer to this than anyone here in the site - many of you know my involvement with Dongfeng Race Team – and the whole Volvo ‘family’ is hurting right now – cut them some slack. Potter knows what I mean. That’s all – I am emotionally drained – out of here! SS PS I hope the photographer who took the Rothmans shot doesn’t mind me using his photo from the 89-90 race
  40. 9 points
    Well, respect for Richard Brisius, not an easy thing to do, and he did it very appropriately. Hope we will see him and others again in a sharing of our grieve, and in consideration of an ongoing race. Thanks Richard.
  41. 9 points
  42. 8 points
    Volvo Ocean Race Diary part 14: Coming to terms with a friend missing at sea If ‘Fish’ was still around he would tell us all to carry on and live his dream for him Annalise Murphy It’s a bit mad really. Three months ago if you’d told me that’d I’d be raring to get going on yet another leg of the Volvo Ocean Race I’d never have believed you. Yet here I am, in Itajai in Brazil, just a few days away from Leg Eight and another 5,700 nautical miles to Newport, Rhode Island, one of the great world sailing destinations. Since that hard leg from Melbourne to Hong Kong, I’ve completely changed my outlook, and am determined to see this race through to the end in 10 weeks’ time. This race isn’t for everyone, and it probably isn’t for me, but I’m still determined to finish; I’m really glad I’ve done this and have got my head around it, and I’ve learned stuff about myself that are just life lessons. In particular, I’ve learned not to give up when you really, really want to give up. I definitely wanted to, but I’m glad I didn’t. I’ve also had a full month off for a holiday with friends in New Zealand. From what I can tell, most people involved in the race have a leg that they feel bad and regretful about, and for me that fourth leg was pretty miserable. But after resolving in Hong Kong to persevere, the leg south again to Auckland was super as we showed we could lead the race to within a few hours of the finish before we were becalmed and we were overtaken. Down but not out, more and more we’ve proven that we’re getting the hang of these boats and how to race them as good as the established teams. Most of us on our crew are newcomers to ocean racing at this level, most are under-30 and we have a 50:50 male/female line-up; all unlike any of the other six teams. With four legs left in the race before the finish in The Hague on June 30th, we’re determined to deliver our goal of a podium result in one of these stages. As I was rotated off the boat for the last leg, I missed out on another Southern Ocean leg and Dee (Caffari) and everyone on board did well to finish with the mast still standing after some rigging damage. Turn the Tide on Plastic has now had a full boatyard overhaul and inspection, and is now back in the water. Before Sunday’s start we have training, an in-port race, pro-am sailing and boat-loading to complete. The next leg should actually be quite pleasant. Although we’re expecting light winds at times and plenty of slogging upwind as we’ll be sailing northwards off the coast of Brazil and later the Caribbean there’ll be plenty of trade-wind conditions and sunshine too. We’ll have the Doldrums – again – but these shouldn’t be too bad as we’ll be crossing so far west. But knowing our luck we’ll get stuck anyway for two weeks! Newport is something of a sailing mecca, and gets great local support so it will be a super stopover. From there it’s the home straight to Europe and the finish. After many previous visits to Brazil, mainly to Rio preparing for the 2016 Olympics, I’ve grown to love this country – the people are very warm and friendly. But Itajai is a much smaller city than Rio, and feels a little bit safer. People are very relaxed. The race is hugely popular here – there were around 47,000 visitors to the race village on one day alone last week, that’s what other ports might expect for the entire stopover. People will stop and ask you interesting questions or just say nice things. Apart from a brief stint at Christmas, I haven’t been home since August, so leaving Brazil means one step closer to getting home. But behind all the preparations for the start, all of us in the race are conscious of our friend John Fisher from the Scallywag team who was lost overboard in the last leg thousands of miles from land during a Southern Ocean gale three weeks ago. It’s incredibly sad. I’ve been extremely upset about it, and in a way I’m glad I wasn’t on the boat when the news came through that Fish was lost. I would have found it very hard to hear such news in those kind of conditions. Unfortunately in this race there are risks and we knew this from the outset – that it isn’t 100 per cent safe. Pushing these boats to the max in some of the remotest parts of the world isn’t completely safe. I met Fish first back in September when we did the crew medics’ course together. While I grappled with training for techniques that could literally save someone’s life, as I questioned my ability he was calm and assured throughout; he just knew what to do. You could just tell that he had a massive amount of experience, and knew what to do but not in a know-it-all kind of way. Ever since then we were quite good friends, and always stopped for a chat, which was typical of him, always making time for other people. He was just one of the nicest people you could meet, and knew everyone involved in the race, not just crew. He was universally liked and admired. Ocean sailing Although he had never sailed in this race before, he was very experienced at ocean sailing, and would definitely have been one of the safest people around. What happened to him – moving forward on the deck – is something that all of us do a hundred times a day, and it was simply bad luck that the boat launched off a wave and gybed unexpectedly. He was hit by the mainsail control tackle and knocked overboard, and was probably unconscious by the time he hit the water. It was Fish who in Hong Kong took me aside and talked it through about me wanting to quit the race. Basically he told me I’d be stupid to drop out! He was probably the person I spoke to most outside our team, and was a huge influence not just for me but on many others and very generous with his time. He just loved every minute of his involvement in the race. We are all devastated at his loss and for his family. But like his Scallywagteam who are determined to carry on, because of the effect he had on the whole race family, we’re all getting on with what we have to do. If he was still around he would certainly give us all the same pep-talk: that we should carry on and live his dream for him. But I still can’t believe he’s gone. https://www.irishtimes.com/sport/other-sports/volvo-ocean-race-diary-part-14-coming-to-terms-with-a-friend-missing-at-sea-1.3464976
  43. 8 points
    Traveling in excess of 25 knots on any vessel under 300 feet in +10 meter seas is wet. Not to say dangerous to the point of being unseamanlike. Any captain has to have a very good justification for continuing at flank speed in such a sea state. But this is exactly the nature of the Volvo Ocean Race. It is kind of like racing up Everest. Let's find a place where mere survival is a challenge and race there... It is inherently risky to the point of stupidity and as a result deemed to be heroic. Some mothers don't see the point. Recall that the design brief was to deliver a boat with performance on par with the Volvo 70 but with enhanced durability and drastically reduced team campaign costs. I think the boats are getting around the oceans more than fast enough, and that Nick Bice and the Boatyard crew are doing a very good job of keeping a fleet ready to go to sea. It has to be an enormous challenge. If the boats throw a bit more water around than I would like, tough shit, I don't race them. SHC
  44. 8 points
    I think the really nice point about the list is not that you would be putting together another all women team, but that the list is a bona-fide all-star list. If you were charged with putting together a team with the serious intent of shooting for a win of the race next time around, nobody would bat an eyelid if you provided a hit list of potential crew-members that included anyone from that list. And they are not just the "crew-member" jobs. That you would be more than happy to have Libby navigating, Liz as boat captain, Sophie up at the pointy end, or indeed Dee running the show says a great deal about how successful the SCA campaign was, and how well the new rule has worked. Traditionally male roles within a male dominated sport are opened up, and opened up purely on merit. And TTTOP is doing a great job feeding the next generation into the game. Which is why, more than anything else, I think the idea of the next race going ever shorter handed is a really desperately bad idea. The ability of a boat, including a top ranking team to carry and train new entrants to the VOR is critical. Dropping to a crew of 6 or worse will lead to teams focussing on only those that have done the race before. Next time it will work OK, as this race has fed the pipeline. But they are eating their seed corn. It has taken two rounds to get to this point, and it is still not fully developed or self sustaining. The race cannot afford to wreck things now.
  45. 8 points
    By the by, maybe we can ease off on the political postings in this thread. I loathe Trump as much as anyone, but talking shit in here is only going to attract the shit lickers.
  46. 8 points
    Scallywag crew all in the hotel now.
  47. 8 points
    I've got him on it . And put out a call for photos to post here too. Just waking up on my boat in the Marlborough Sounds of NZ for an Easter break. They will probably have to fly in a short delivery rig quick and sail to Brazil for a new full sized stick.
  48. 8 points
    If you guys stopped quoting Random, life will improve immensely
  49. 8 points
    This sport and this edition has virtually no audience anyway compared to world sports...... Yes it would happen either way . To suggest I have no right to an opinion because i've not rounded the horn is ridiculous.... As said, regardless of BH's content his delivery and timing are offensive. As usual. SA giving it oxygen is also typical. I'm laying low for a while.... I hope Brunel can hang on to this well deserved lead and that TTTOP can also get a podium I would love to see the Scally's sail around the corner in honor of Fish and maybe the raw beauty of the place can help all come to turns with the loss.
  50. 8 points
    The above Scally vid was the genesis to these thoughts. Witty's style is accentuated by he being the only non European skipper (if you count east coast American to more closely align with their eastern Atlantic cousins) in this edition. Therefore Witty's style has polarised opinions with many seeing it as a breath of fresh air, others preferring the more reserved Euro approach. Maybe if there was a couple of skippers of antipodean and or convict stock he wouldn't stand out as much in the humility department? Two things that Witty clearly hasn't truly appreciated about this race up until maybe now. One is the level of talent, experience and professionalism sitting on other boats and what that means. Two as a consequence of failing to recognise that, of the seven teams, his is the only "zero sum game" team. That is his gains are equivalent to and only generated by others losses. While he might think about blaming a wind hole or blown runner block for being out the back from the start of this leg and now bleeding over 150 mile in arrears, I think he now finally understands Scally's "zero sum game" status. That realisation will hit him hard I suspect. Humility halts arrogance and prevents it being sterile ground for learning, innovation and improvement. The Plastics, Akzo and Brunel have in varying degrees made improvements since leaving Alicante to narrow the gap to the other three early front runners. It is even very reasonable to now place Akzo as a real contender by their now demonstrating no real weakness like the Brothers Red at any point of sail, conditions or with routing as opposed to the other two improvers and Vestas with the jury still out over their upwind speed. The arrogance of success is to think that what you did yesterday will be sufficient for tomorrow. If that has penetrated Witty's skull then there is still hope for him improving.