jtsailjt

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About jtsailjt

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  • Location
    Penobscot Bay
  • Interests
    Cruising, traveling, motorcycling, archery, snowmobiling, lots of other stuff
  1. jtsailjt

    Coolboats to admire

    Yup! Me too. I always liked the Shellback! It's Joel White design IIRC C'est vrai! I met Joel once back in the 80s. He was so kind and friendly I made it my mission to build one of his designs first. That's a great tender and a very fun sailor when you drop the hook in a quiet cove after a brilliant summer day of sailing. I only met Joel once also. Standing at the end of his boatyards dock at about 8AM on a still Sunday morning with nobody else around waiting for my friends to wake up and come in to shore in their dinghy to take me out to their B40 for the sail back to SW Harbor this quite tall, older guy came strolling out the dock and quietly enjoyed the view with me for a few minutes. I had no idea who he was, just seemed like a nice older man who was enjoying being close to the water and the peaceful beginning of a new day as I was. Eventually he asked what brought me to Brooklin (NOT what the hell you doing on my dock?) and I explained what I was doing and that my friends seemed to have overslept. He casually said, well why don't you row one of those dinghys (as he nodded towards the dinghy dock) out to your friends boat, and I replied (still no clue who he was) that I didn't have a dinghy here and wouldn't want to borrow one without owners permission. He said, it's OK, you can use any of those down there, just leave it on the mooring and I'll come out and get it later. So, still thinking it a bit odd for anyone to make such a statement, I thanked him and introduced myself and he introduced himself and the light finally came on. He'd already been diagnosed with cancer and only lived a few more years but based on that one chance meeting, I really wish I could have got to know him better. From everything I've heard about him, that's pretty much how he treated everyone, a really nice man!
  2. jtsailjt

    Defender's Warehouse Sale

    We plan to be there near opening time on thursday. Need bottom paint, new 11' RIB, 20hp outboard, new fender covers, and who knows what else we'll see that we just can't live without?! I've ordered lots of stuff from there but am excited about visiting the store for the first time!
  3. jtsailjt

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    After periodically contributing to the liberation of large chunks of the world, the U.S. battleships have all been retired. They certainly impressed Admiral Yamamoto and quite a few others in their day. Fortunate that little of the world (or even NATO) is dependent on the Dutch Navy these days. Or even the Dutch. If Dr. Paris - who is, in fact, a doctor - has a boat to his liking and within his budget, that's up to him. Any deficiencies, real or imagined, are not the fault of the US Navy. I'm a doctor too, sort of, PhD in math. I think especially these days as the pay is so shitty and the work so hard "Dr" should be reserved for physicians. Stanley is a physical therapist, I think. I stand corrected. He's a pseudo-chiropractor, it seems. Thanks for the heads up. "It wasn’t long into my career, about six months, and I had entered the gymnasium where I was teaching a class of about 12 people with back pain. A lot of therapy in those days was done in classes. I asked this man to put his right leg over his left leg and he couldn’t do it so I gave him a shove and his back cracked and he was frightened, I was frightened, and I got disciplined. That was on a Friday. "On Monday, he didn’t show up for classes and I was frightened that I really had caused him some harm. He walks in later, shakes my hand, and thanks me for helping him significantly. "So, I then discussed this with my father and my father said, “Well, that’s what manipulation is and that’s what you did to him.” I said, “Well, where can I learn that?” He said, “Well, you won’t in physical therapy school.” I said, “Well, who does these?” He said, “Chiropractors.” And they’re my biggest competition. So, I then said, “Well, maybe I want to be a chiropractor.” And he said, “No. Come and look at these books.” And on the shelf he had books by Cyriax and Mennell. "I looked at those books and I started reading and after about a month he said, “Are you really seriously interested in this work?” I said, “Yes. We need this in physical therapy.” He said, “Okay. When you get through school I’ll send you to England and do things like that and you’ll be able to teach this when you come back.” That’s how it started." http://www.physicaltherapycontinuingeducation.org/manipulation-of-the-cervical-spine-with-dr-stanley-paris/ So in addition to having begun working in physical therapy for his father, did he actually become a DO or MD, or is the term Dr. that he uses just sort of a nickname he thought would sound nice in front of his last name? Is he a doctor or not?
  4. jtsailjt

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    If these are the right times/distance, and though I hate doing math in public, 269nm during the 12 hour period between 1300 and 0100 means he averaged over 22 knots. Is that possible?
  5. jtsailjt

    Bye Bye to AGM

    Maine Sail, I checked out Morgan Clouds site and even managed to pry the $20 out of my wallet to become a subscriber. Lots of good info on a variety of subjects, including batteries and charging.
  6. jtsailjt

    Bye Bye to AGM

    "like a cruiser normally does" If he doesn't have solar panels or wind generator aboard. I have 4- 4D AGM's and find that the best way to care for them while cruising is to get them to within about 30 amps of full using either the engine (underway) or genset (on the hook) and make sure I finish doing that with at least several hours of strong daylight or wind left so the solar panels or wind generator can finish the job. That way I don't waste diesel fuel for an extra hour and a half to pack in that last 30amps to fill my AGM's back up. Almost every day I manage to fill them up to capacity and am hopeful that they will last quite awhile. On my last boat I also had AGM's but without wind or solar capability and it was very tough to always have the patience to run the genset long enough to keep them full. One technique I used was to start the genset and battery charger alone to have max amps available for the battery charger while the acceptance rate was still high, and as the battery started to fill up and the acceptance rate started to drop, I'd add the hot water heater and DC refrigeration to the gensets load. So, the highest DC load item (refrigeration) was almost never powered by the batteries, but rather was powered by the alternator or battery charger, which reduced the amount the AGM's would be drawn down over the rest of the day, requiring less of an uphill battle getting them back to full. I also would equalize my AGM's once a year near the end of the season and it didn't seem to do them any harm but I can't definitively say it did them any great good either. They were 5 years old and going strong when I sold the boat though. If my current AGM's died, I'd be tempted by good 6V wet cells, but for the safety factor of never spilling acid and no gasses being emitted and less chance of explosion, I think I'd replace them with more AGM'$.
  7. jtsailjt

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    They'll all sit through his "extensive meetings" and patiently listen to him, and dutifully, no one will mention anything embarrassing to him like that you can break about any boat if you put a couple thousand pounds of tension on a furling line or crash jibe in 40 knot winds with no preventer rigged, and then they'll tell him that for another million $$$ or so they can make everything just right for him. Catering to eccentric older sailors whose most outstanding characteristic is a propensity for writing very big checks to them has long been a tradition in Maine boatbuilding, so they will know just how to deal with the situation when Kiwi Spirit gets back in the yard.
  8. jtsailjt

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    I don't understand why this would work. Can you attempt to explain the physics, the how and why, "a little heel" makes you go faster?
  9. jtsailjt

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    What a project and what a sailboat! I'm all the way on the east coast and finally got around to reading through this thread and now I can barely stand the wait to see pix of her under sail and to hear all about how she sails. I don't know how Bob and Kimbottles and all of those fortunate enough to be involved in this can stand to wait a minute longer. I predict that you're going to leave a lot of racing sailboat skippers re-trimming already perfectly trimmed sails and resolving to fire the guy they hired to scrub their bottoms and muttering and questioning themselves about how they got smoked by some guy just out for a daysail in this really pretty, classic looking boat, fun!
  10. jtsailjt

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    I agree. Based on what info we have, I can't really see anything wrong with what the designers did. For that matter, I haven't seen anything indicating that the builders did a bad job either except for some rigging issues and I'm not sure that's really the builders fault. Maybe they did their jobs perfectly and for that are due respect, well about as much respect as every other designer or builder is due who sends a boat to sea, but at least at this point not more respect either, at least until we know a lot more about what this boat is actually capable of. I understand why top racers, where someone, and usually several professional sailors are paying strict attention to every slight wind shift, wind gust, and the way the boat negotiates every single wave, prefer to not use preventers, but for a singlehander to not rig one in strong winds while he is sleeping seems pretty crazy to me. That sort of seems like something that was covered in Sailing 101. Ditto with cranking on the furler until it's a twisted, broken, mess with a ripped sail. I'm an airline pilot and for about 5 years went through a phase of flying from the US east coast to various eastern European destinations and during that time became all too familiar with what sleep deprivation and screwing around with circadian rhythms can do to us all. Attempting to try to understand controllers talking in various languages to other aircraft on the same frequency and with heavily accented English to us, and then shoot an approach and land in bad weather at a strange airport at 4AM body time could become challenging but not even close to what a singlehander is faced with when he goes weeks and months on end without a good nights sleep. Fortunately, for these flights we had 3 pilots in the cockpit and as I would brief the 3rd guy, "we've all probably temporarily lost about 1/3 of our IQ's over the last 12 hours, so if ALL 3 (not just the 2 sitting in the control seats) of us try to focus on paying attention and backing each other up, we MIGHT stand a pretty good chance of being able to land without doing anything really stupid or generating any excess paperwork." My point is that offshore singlehanders are constantly fatigued and are only human so are prone to doing things clumsily or even completely wrong, even simple tasks they know by heart, so I think the errors that Dr. Paris apparently made that ended his voyage are pretty understandable, even to the point of being almost predictable and that's why the boat should have been set up with KISS in mind, especially considering that everyone knew that the skipper wasn't to be a 35 year old professional sailor with boundless reserves of energy. But then it's pretty tough to make a boat simple and foolproof when it's also supposed to be capable of breaking an around the world record with a very old amateur sailor who's not yet fully acclimated to sailing this particular boat at the helm.
  11. jtsailjt

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    What exactly did either the designers, builder, or Dr. Paris do that you feel is worthy of giving them respect? I still am not 100% sure where most of the fault lies, but apparently Dr. Paris wrote several million dollars worth of checks which the designers and builder cashed, and neither the boat or skipper came close to accomplishing what it was built to do. It's his money and he can fritter it away any way he chooses, and the designer/builders can build whatever boat their client says he wants and is willing to pay for, it's all legal, but I guess I don't see how any of it is particularly respectable and more than if someone hired a team to build them a one off $20,000 sailing dinghy and then made it only halfway down the bay before he broke it and had to get towed back to his mooring.
  12. jtsailjt

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    If a wealthy, recreational skier shows up at the Olympics this winter and somehow convinces them to allow him to compete in the mens downhill race using the most expensive pair of skis and ski equipment money can buy, and then he crashes halfway down the first headwall, is that really something admirable that he had the dream and embarked down the ski slope, or is it just as silly as if you or I tried to do the same thing on our trusty old Volkl's without any more preparation than he had? I'd also like to learn what caused the gear failures he experienced so all can learn from them. Something good can still come of this debacle. It seems to me that this guys ego caused him to attempt something that was pretty unrealistic for him to achieve and then a whole bunch of "experts" that he was writing very large checks to didn't tell him what he didn't want to hear, at least until very recently when it became quite obvious that what he was attempting was both dangerous to him and extremely unlikely to end in any good advertising for their businesses or their "expert" abilities.
  13. jtsailjt

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    I agree that the "no hydrocarbons" thing is pretty silly given the fact that before engines were invented that's the way everybody did it, as well as all the hydrocarbons involved in having a high tech boat like this built, but I guess I don't understand what is great about any of it. He's an old man who had enough success in his financial life to afford to decide to spend a bunch of his money jousting at a windmill without learning how to joust or even ride a horse, and as it turned out he was unable to defeat that pesky windmill. Oh well, no big surprise. And what would have really been accomplished if he had somehow succeeded in making it all the way around? I think he's doing the right thing by quitting and am glad he survived, and I fully support his right to spend his money any way he deems appropriate, but I just don't see anything particularly "great" about it.
  14. jtsailjt

    Coolboats to admire

    Paine 14, Herreshoff 12 looks with an updated keel and rudder. I'd like to have one of these to play with.... http://www.chuckpaine.com/boats/paine-14-trailerable-sailboat/
  15. jtsailjt

    Coolboats to admire

    I haven't heard that term since the Aubrey/Maturin series. Likely the only stuns'l most of us will ever fly is when we decide to air out the bath towels while underway.