Dave Clark

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324 F'n Saint

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About Dave Clark

  • Rank
    Anarchist

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  • Website URL
    http://www.fulcrumspeedworks.com/UFO/

Profile Information

  • Location
    Rhode Island
  • Interests
    UFO, International Canoe, C-Class

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2,404 profile views
  1. Dave Clark

    Vulcan 15 (My new boat design!)

    Glad to know you've got it all worked out. I'm going to get back to building boats now. DRC
  2. Dave Clark

    Vulcan 15 (My new boat design!)

    Craploads! Ask my wife about it. I hardly sleep. However, on the off chance that the OP isn't a troll, I feel a civic duty to ask useful questions before the money-fire spreads out of control. DRc
  3. Dave Clark

    Vulcan 15 (My new boat design!)

    Metal or composite spars? DRC
  4. Dave Clark

    Vulcan 15 (My new boat design!)

    Now I'm super interested. How are you going to build that guy? DRC
  5. Dave Clark

    Vulcan 15 (My new boat design!)

    How far down the road are you on tooling design? You'll need to reconcile that against intended labor hours per hull. Also don't skimp on your analysis of outfitting time . You can do yourself real harm discounting how long it can take to outfit the thing. Last but not least be sure you understand the fully loaded cost of labor (hint: it way more the cost of an hourly "wage"). First things first, don't hesitate for a minute to build a working prototype in order to test your initial suppositions. DRC
  6. Dave Clark

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Paul, I really do not want to be a wet blanket here but you're putting a lot of faith into rope tension. Foil AOA driven by in-line cord tension, regardless of rope quality ends up with a lot of elasticity in it. We distinctly didn't drive AoA or depth with rope for this reason, having seen some scary results in C-class foil control systems. Carry on experimenting, but I'd like to voice that stretch will be a real limitation to control. DRC
  7. Dave Clark

    DC Designs

    I keep trying to post pictures of Mike Costello's new boat, but some sort of new feature designed to block the posting of hardcore pornography keeps blocking the posts... DRC
  8. Dave Clark

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Yes. But tyvek take can fix that. DRC
  9. Dave Clark

    And Now...for something TOTALLY New!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demand_curve You can be saturated and also have a market that consists of 0.000000001% of the population. It's a matter of value vs other goods and -this is the most important part- not simply goods in that category but all categories that vie for consumer dollars to fill a need. The big piece that often goes unconsidered: People don't need sailboats. They need to be happy. There are other routes to that which are smoking the sailboat in the race to consumer dollars. DRC
  10. Dave Clark

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Yes. It gets you in the neck when you tack. DRC
  11. Dave Clark

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Yup, that's precisely why its built like that. Lasers do it the same way for the same reason. All attempts to build a system that retained the mast that wasn't the cunno resulted in disgusting failure. All told the cunningham on the boat has virtually no effect, so where it is and how it works is of limited concern. I've come to the conclusion that the outhaul is the big difference-maker on tuning, barring rig tension for wind range differences. Regarding shallow draft foiling, 2 minutes with a 1/4 inch pistol drill will make flying around on a sandbar possible. I had that on Roswell, the first production prototype and it was really amusing. You could fly about 6 inches over the water with 18 inches of maximum draft. Didn't go to weather well, but it was ludicrously stable because the lift vector was barely any lower than the bottom of the hull. Amazingly roll-stable. Also once you're even a few inches up you're at the foil-drag version of max ride-height. DRC
  12. Dave Clark

    Foiling, how heavy is too heavy?

    I hate to be cynical but I think I fixed it for you. Don't think: foiling=faster. It isn't. Think: costless reductions of drag and increases in power to weight ratio=faster. Simply putting T-foils on an OD14 will almost certainly make it slower. DRC
  13. Dave Clark

    Foiling, how heavy is too heavy?

    Anything can be fitted with foils and flown in the same way that anything can be fitted with wheels and driven. As with both, mass negates performance, unless it is being used towards the production of horsepower. Right at centerline, it isn't doing that for you. It will work, but it might work less well than it did as a floater. DRC
  14. Dave Clark

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    The first clinic is also, obviously a no go. We're going to punt back to later in the season, though presently all scheduling is entirely by ear. I'm sorry to not have any firmer information, but this scenario is very difficult to judge. As few as 100 irate Kentuckians or any number of other uncooperative forces can so easily throw the spread back into warp-speed. On the good news front, Fulcrum is still operating. To cut contagion risk we've split our shifts in two Half the team shows up 5am to 1pm and the other half goes from 1pm to 9pm. Kirk is working from home and I'm running the whole show 16 hours a day (oof) from the engineering crows-nest above the shop floor. This maintains directorial capacity (especially important because our foreman Ernesto is only on site for the first shift) while maintaining social distance. We have very stringent health and safety measures in place, down to PPE, disinfecting the hell out of everything and obviously isolated work cells that limit contact. However, even with that in place, we don't know if and when we'll get sick. Due to that, we are leaning on automation harder than ever before, which is yielding encouraging results. We are surprisingly busy, all things considered. I think a good deal of it comes from two factors. 1. All fleet activity is basically cancelled for most of this season in all one design classes, so people are on the hunt for a boat to sail which is fun in itsself, rather than purely due to a racing context. 2. We deliver to your door. #2 may actually be the bigger factor. Across the planet we are seeing an acceleration of the inevitable pivot to a home delivery economy. This will not fully revert when this crisis is over, and while I never saw covid this situation coming, the outright trend toward a factory-to-user alignment was always part of our business model. So we are strangely vindicated on that count. Let us know and we'll ship your next adventure to your home today. Obviously, please don't try to order your boat to an eighth floor walkup. It is not yet compatible with studio living. Let's get flying! DRC
  15. Dave Clark

    ac 2021? fuggedaboudit!

    Do you smell toast, grandpa?