SEZED

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About SEZED

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  1. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Thanks Chris and Steve, I will build that sort of recess into the next carriage, and in the meantime I’ll sort something with Dyneema, and maybe a recessing tool I suppose it goes to the centre of the seat, an eyelet or something, the seat currently doesn’t have a hole or anything, I didn’t build it.
  2. SEZED

    DC Designs

    I’ve been having problems with the seat retaining system, can someone help? current problem is on a new rules boat with a Steve Clark (US) seat. How to I retain the seat without the line jamming and where does the line go? On my other new rules the line attaches above the seat to a bridele and connects to the seat to a saddle on the flat back side of the wedge shape. In this configuration it ALWAYS jams on the carriage or gets caught unless you are very careful when tacking and throwing the seat across. On my Nethercott, the seat retainer connects through an eyelet on the underside of the wedge shape in the centre and this works with that carriage, but it won’t work easily with my carriage on the new rules boat with the SC symmetrical seat. There isn’t an6 clearance on this carriage, and the seat doesn’t have an eyelet in it or anywhere to attach to, I have been just ty8ng the line to the main sheet block saddle and a hole in the centre of the foot strap, but this is less than ideal and catches all the time, just like on the other boat... Is there a better way? And can you explain it it words here?
  3. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Not the fastest.... but fast enough to win everything and more easily handled in the heavy stuff. I want to know more about the "Gentleman's IC" from Centre Island.... I could be a gentleman one day, if I tried hard perhaps....
  4. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Please correct me if I am wrong Dave, but... The machete hull form is specifically designed for a ply+frame construction to be built easily and to a budget and yet to still be fast. If you want to build a composite hull then there are other hull forms that would be better... such as the dance commander / Maas / Morrison etc etc. Less chines and more curves means better suited to composite construction. Stressed ply uses the inherent strength of the curve + the ply + the reinforcement lining the curved hull, minimal curves. Machete uses the strength of what are essentially flat panels reinforced with frames. Composite uses the strength of the material, and curves can help, but typically with minimal frames. My take on this is that if you want to go down the composite path, a single chined boat with more curves would make more sense.
  5. SEZED

    DC Designs

    For details - check out the Machete thread: Plenty of details on that thread about the how and why for a Machete boat - as in a ply with frames boat as opposed to Phil's Stressed Ply style boats
  6. SEZED

    DC Designs

    A-Class, It seems there are a few of us thinking about a new IC build in preparation for the 2020 worlds in AUS. The key ones are contactable via the stalkbook AUS IC page. Perhaps it may be a good idea for some of us to unite with a build effort. Of course that would require us to agree on what hull to go with... we all seem to want something different. I would strongly recommend picking up one of the cheap Nethercotts that are around and giving that a try for a while before commencing a build. Just to see if it's what you want to do, the Nethercott is more stable to transition on and there are some available at very low cost if you know where to look. But if you are keen on a new rules build. The Machete would be a sensible option for a first build. It's a proven design and there is a build manual and files/kit readily available from Fulcrum. I've seen it in action and its awesome. I would say it is very competitive in the right hands. Sure whooped my ass and I was sailing a good boat. If you were going to go it on your own, a Machete is a really good idea - as all the problems have been solved - as in rig and fit out design. Do what the build manual says. Any other design and you will probably get a decent hull shape, but the rest of the problem - the fittings, the lay out, the carriage and rails etc - well that will all be up to you to solve. It's part of the fun of the IC - I can't wait to build mine and try things the way I want them, but I have had a few IC's, and sailed some other ones, to see how different things work - thus the original recommendation to grab a cheap working nethercott as a starting point. The Maas Hulls are glorious. They are fast and beautiful. Composite, Strong etc etc. But again, you would have to figure out how to build a hull to Chris's table of offsets and figure out how you want it fitted out. If you are really keen to try a funky build - Phil Stevenson's Hollow Log Design, or a modification of it, like AUS 33 MCR, is always an option. He has posted links to his guide earlier in this post. PM me if you can't find it and if you are interested. I have one of these too, and it is far trickier to sail than any of the other IC's I've sailed. Fast off the wind, but tricky. Again, this would require you to figure out how you want to fit it out. Machete has already solved all the problems. The Flat Pack IC's are an option too, but since Christian is potentially thinking of a different design, then maybe not. I have one, and I like it a lot. But I'm not at the top of the fleet either. So if you are new to the class and want to get sailing an IC in Aus prior to the 2020 Worlds here's my thoughts: 1. Grab a cheap and working Nethercott and give it a go! 2. Join the Aus IC Stalkbook Page - and the IC stalkbook page too. Potential there to pool ideas and resources on builds. 3. If you want to jump in the deep end with a new rules - seriously consider the Machete. It is the goods. The Clarks are awesome and so is their product. 4. Get creative. Grab a copy of the rules from the UK IC website and come up with your own design and give it a try. This is what I want to do, but I do so knowing I have a Nethercott and a Flatpack to fall back on when by design craps out. 5. You could import a new rules IC from the UK or the US. There are a few in each country for sale. The hard part here is the shipping to AUS is prohibitive. PM me for specific details if you want POC's etc
  7. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Great write Up Willy, Can't wait to see what you are capable of in 2020 once the new boat blues are squared away. Don't forget to bring your brother! Now to get some builds happening in AUS. Because I don't think I capsized enough at Pwllheli, I'm thinking something really unstable to help me capsize more... Or I could take the sensible option and go for a SST build, and then learn how to keep it upright.
  8. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Design Tweaked.... I'm expecting lots of build techniques tips at Pwllheli! you know - little things like what weight reinforcing to use etc etc... And I'll be taking pictures of all your deck layouts etc for stealing your ideas
  9. SEZED

    DC Designs

    tweaked... I-Beam structure in the guts for strength and hopefully this one would have enough of an edge that won't suck down if it hits the water
  10. SEZED

    DC Designs

    The concave top was the key element of the design I was after.... I will definitely keep this aspect. In my quest for circular - or rather spherical symmetry - I didn't even think of that - the getting sucked down bit - just like an upside-down aeroplane wing I suppose... Back to the drawing board :-) I was kind of inspired by a study of the Sydney Opera House that described the inherent strength of spherical arcs, as you can see in the linked video, from about 16:37. I'm not an engineer, but it seemed like a good idea. Of course,I didn't consider hydrodynamics.
  11. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Anyone ever used a seat profile like the orange one in this image? possible pros/cons? carbon/foam construction
  12. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Are the upward forces on the jib boom that significant?
  13. SEZED

    DC Designs

    I've recently got Aus 32 back on the water and I'm looking to get a new set of sails. (Need to train for the worlds you see...) Before I do - I want a Jib boom, and may need to make sure the Jib design factors this in. I've been thinking about Black Betty's Jib boom and although I like it, I think you need to be better than me at boat building to integrate it into the hull. I am thinking of something that can be retrofitted to any hull - so I can use something similar on my Nethercott as well, with no hull modification. I don't like the droopy one and the UK style seems to need more things hanging of the mast and lines to control it. I think my design might work, if factored into the sail design, and it should be passive rather than needing control lines - as inspired by Black Betty
  14. SEZED

    DC Designs

    Made a model, it's very pointy. I like it A bit rough, not finished, but you can see the effect I'm after
  15. SEZED

    DC Designs

    So Dave and Steve - your UFO is awesome... I get that it is a recreational boat and I love it. If you ever get sales in Aus I would probably be interested... But when I look at all the pictures of your UFO, all I see is a possible solution to my shroud-less rig problem, for retrofitting the log with a large main, or for a jib/main rig for my conceptual IC that has a really narrow shroud base. Anyone care to comment on the feasibility? Lets say that Dave decided to sell "spare rigs" once the UFO gets off the ground, could I buy one and "bolt the rig" onto a narrow shroud base IC, add a 2.2m jib and sail around with a funky elegantly engineered rig on an IC and expect it to sail fast and point high?