Superhawkathan

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About Superhawkathan

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  • Location
    Solomon's, MD
  • Interests
    Racing, crusing, nerdy engineering stuff, and my lovely wife/bow girl! Check out our boat on FB (www.facebook.com/shortbussailing)!

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  1. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    Did you guys just order everything off the Melges 32 website? What all was needed (new top and bottom bearings, new rudder envelope, new tiller, and new rudder)? Was it a pretty straight change out or did you need to modify the "rudder hole"?
  2. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    Aperson, how did you go about doing this? I was thinking of doing something like you just mentioned, but figured it could end up getting screwed up pretty easily. Did you just mix up the epoxy and then take like a spatula and run around the edge where the bearings roll against?
  3. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    Boat's in the water done a few club races already, got to try out our new 1.5 kite this last weekend. She is prudy and crispy.... still smells like the loft haha. Plan to take the boat apart this weekend and head to a little shin dig down in VA at the beginning of June. Eerie have you change out your rudder cassette bearings at all? I'm starting to get some free play in mine maybe about a 16th of a inch and trying to figure out how this can be fixed without doing a big mod costly mod to swap out the entire system for a Melges 32 setup like Savage did to his years ago. Cheers,
  4. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    Any new news from any of the hendo owners?
  5. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    The hendo is a great 30 footer, the boat you are currently looking at is the one that convinced us to buy one! As with any 20+ year old sport boat there will be some little things here and there, but so far we have very little issues with ours and we have been racing it hard for the last 3 years in conditions from 0 - 40 kts... (The upwind above 30 kts is not the most fun... that's why its good to be the driver, 6 people in front of you to block the water). Your concern about the water in the boat... the boat is a very wet boat as there are alot of holes in it. Some of it can simply be fixed by re-bedding the hardware as we have done, but the big culprit is around the mast and the V-hatch.... you're just bound to get water into the interior. We will routinely take about a half 5 gallon bucket of water out of it a week here on the east coast as it is super humid in the summer and we only have some damp raid containers in the boat (don't worry sails are not kept on the boat, if they were we would be running a dehumidifier). Just something we have added to the pre-race routine. As Eerie mentioned that is all monolithic glass on the hull to deck joint as well as below most hardware locations, ours has the same thing going on there. Since the class is not very active anymore we have changed our sails quite a bit from the class size, increased the main size a bit (which allowed us to take some of the rake of the mast out) and decreased the A2 size by about 100 sqft or so. We are currently looking at potentially adding a A1.5 to the setup as the A2 is not the best reacher. The boat seems pretty well balanced in a blow now and very maintainable on plain (A5 is our heavy weather kite in 22+). The older designed kites just seemed to be to big for us to really get the boat dialed in. Super happy with how the boat is running now! We also pinned (no longer wiggles back and fourth) the sprit to center as it gave us 3 sec a mile back on our rating, we actually like this setup now as it makes extending and retracting the pole much simpler. We also added a kite take down system that helps get the big kite back in the boat in about 8-10 seconds from full up to put away rounding the mark. All these setups allowed us to be very competitive in the ORC system. I will say pay the extra coin and get the international cert. We had a club cert for KWRW and an international cert for CRW, we went from 618 GPH to 632 GPH or something close to that just because of the actual measurements. Club assumes you have the best everything like righting moment, etc. If you look at the ORC sport class from CRW 2017 you can see the hendo is competitive with even the new sport boats! Our target weight that I would recommend trying to sail at is around 1250ish lbs. For us this means 8 up and we have found that even in the light with 8 on the boat we are still much quicker than most of our class. I'm sure that you read through this thread the boat likes the weight to keep on its feet. Also in planning condition downwind crew should be hiking behind the driver is possible, that helps a ton. All that to say if you like the boat and don't mind a little elbow grease to clean it up, and maybe tighten some bolts, they are great boats!!! I'll be happy as any other to share any info as other have with me, just let me know! Cheers
  6. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    Happy New Year to you all as well!!! Anyone got their Hendo signed up for some away regattas?
  7. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    I thought I heard that if you reach out to SOCA they might have some still laying around the shop, but that was just something I heard through the grape vine.
  8. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    That would be cool to see. Did they just move the chain plates aft or did they move them out to the shear and aft as well? Just in case anyone else out there in Hendo world cares, but we have been working pretty hard with Quantum on updating and redesigning the hendo sail plan. The kite has changed shape and size along with the main and so far we are liking the way the boat feels and moves. Our previous kites were really a bit to large and were a pain to qybe in big air and wouldn't set right in the lighter air. The main, though big, wasn't quite big enough to compensate for being at the low range of the #3 or the upper range of the #1 (we don't have a #2 since most of our racing is not in the 13-16 kts wind range). It was also just old and since it needed to be replaced we worked hard to look at the current sport boats on the market and see how they are being setup and what is and isn't working. The only down side to the new main is that we had to go to black battens to support and stiffen up the leach, and we all know that when you do that the cost goes up! Just throwing this out there in-case you are looking at changing up your sail plan or refreshing it, I am more than willing to suggest our changes. Cheers,
  9. It shouldn't be, according to all the ORC talking. "Science-based, transparent, etc." Serious question: How do you game a system like this? We know the guy who won the Euros had an actual cheater boat now that that protest has been heard. Is Tangent doing the same thing, or simply lucky they have a boat that rates so well across so many rules? Clean, You asked the question so I feel like I need to pipe in with my observations. So far with the Bus's experience with ORC has been a mixed one, pretty much got it handed to us in Key West (we were the smallest/lightest boat and had a club cert) and didn't do to bad in Charleston (in a class of light displacement and only a difference in length of 6' between all boats and had an international cert). First off having the boat officially measured helped out on the rating quite a bit (now this is not gaming the system unless you intentionally hide weight or tape batteries to the top of the rig for example). When ORC computes the club cert it assumes the best of everything, like for example an amazing righting moment. I noticed that this really hurt our boat and once we were measured it was amazing the difference in assumed righting moment within the VPP. We have head about what happened at the Euros and I think they tried to cheat the system pretty well, but besides actually moding the boats to have more displacement when measured and not when racing, I think there is something you could do. I took some time to play around with creating trial cert's via the OCR website prior to Key Wet and besides changing standard things like sail areas, the thing that caught be by surprise was how the rating changed when you manipulate crew weight. My initial thought was that more crew weight = more weight = slower boat, well after further review it looks like the VPP can differentiate between the time sailing to weather and sailing downwind. When crew weight is increased your righting moment increases thereby making you faster upwind, you do see a hit downwind, but the computer knows that you are spending more time going upwind than downwind (for us in 20kts its about 60% upwind and 30% downwind). This makes your rating worse (lower number) the more crew weight you add. So assuming you leave your cert at the default crew weight (on our boat it assumes 1119lbs, Charleston cert we claimed 1250lbs, Key West cert we claimed 1350lbs), but sail with actually more weight on the rail or "forget to claim the weight you're sailing at", you would be gaming the system. I noted a difference that the rating dropped by about 4-5 seconds a mile by just adding 200 lbs. Now this might only be a larger issue on boats of lighter displacement as weight placement is more critical than on a big cruiser/racer, but it is still a difference. In close handicap racing like we had in ORC C in Chucktown this could make a difference where a boat comes out. This was just once case study that I did, so take that for what it is worth. I'm sure that if ORC keeps spreading and they are able to have a NA's or even a Worlds here in the next 2 - 3 years (per Dobbs at a ORC round table held at Charleston Race Week) there would be weigh-ins and boat checks to ensure that everyone is sailing to what is claimed on their cert. As of this moment I'm leaning more to ORC than PHRF and I say that because it takes out human bias. Its funny to me how a Hendo in the PNW rates 54 then I bring it to the Chesapeake Bay and it all of a sudden rates 42. All I can say is that physics are physics, they work where ever you are on the planet, not more so in one area than the other. Additionally both rating systems assume the same thing, well sailed, clean bottom, good sails; however PHRF will say "we are changing your rating because so and so a long time ago kicked some ass and the boat wasn't rated correctly" or that "you have been out-sailing everyone for the past couple of years (not us by the way) and your rating needs to be adjusted". Anyway I digress.... The one down fall to ORC is cost. Club cert will run you around $100, International cert is around $8-$10 a foot but you also have to get measured and that's whatever the measurer will charge you. This will then turn into a game of who pays more, but once measured you don't have to do it again unless you mod something. You can run trial certs all day for about 10 bucks a pop and see what will happen to your rating if you change this or that; rather than waiting for a group of people to get in a room once every 3-4 months, dawn there robes, recite their chants, light their candles, and pay their tribute to the rating gods. Cheers PS - Whoever wants to win a trophy by cheating, you're a bit of a douche bag!
  10. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    What was the reason to going to symm? I know the previous owner of my boat did this to try and compete better with the local Farr 30's but I'm not to sure how the boat did in that config. We have been really playing around with the tune of the boat. Like I mentioned we have gone to a lot less rake, increased the size of the main to about 385 sqft and are slowly changing the aspect ratio of the kites (we are down to about 1078 sqft on our largest kit rather than 1250) to more reacher/runner type. Reason for this is that we really felt like there was to much kite up and it was having a hard time rotating through on the gybes. Seems like now we are a little faster in the gybes and staying on plane when the conditions are right. The boat is still stupid fast, but much more of a handful off the breeze with the redesign of the kite and slightly bigger main and the fact that we are sailing in a more bow up mode. I have also pinned the sprit to center and I can say that it is much more simple at mark roundings and gets a body out of the center of the boat and on the rail during gybes! Again we are just playing around with setup's and different mods, since we don't really have a class anymore we are pretty much able to play around with the sail plan and setup.
  11. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    So the interesting thing in these pics Eerie is that they didn't take the chain plates out to the shear line and increase the spreader sweep like I thought they would have to to drop the runners. I wonder how the rig was really supported off the wind as the standard hendo doesn't have a whole lot of sweep on the spreaders. I guess that as long as the backstay wasn't eased to much you don't have to many issues. The second question that comes to mind is how was forestay tension controlled, I didn't think that the forestay and uppers could adjust enough to get the rig setup right for the right conditions. The uppers are already pretty tight on my right and the forestay is about about as bottomed out as it can get and still be pinned. In this setup if we dropped the runners our forestay would have about 6" of sag to leeward and we wouldn't be able to ever get into point mode regardless of the breeze. We sail our boat with a lot less rake then what some of the old tuning guides suggest.
  12. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    Hawk, Paul Amon built a few boats like this. The problem is rig would need to get taller like what Melges did with 32 for conversion from 30. Yeah that is what Glenn has stated in conversations with me, they mainly did that for the Caribbean boats as there wasn't really the need for a genoa down there. I'm not totally convinced you would need to get a bigger rig, though it would certainly help. Glenn seemed to think that the boat would actually perform a little better without the genoa as you could get a light code 1 on an inhaul system and point like crazy! Thinking off the top of my head if you increased rig height you might have to increase sprit length otherwise you aspect ratio for the Kite will starting getting a little out of wack, but I'm not a sail designer. I have toyed with the idea of trying to find a Farr 30 code 1 that isn't shot and not crazy expensive to do a case study with (might need a little moding to fit the I measurement and J). I know the Farr 30 we used to sail against in the light up wind was still a tough boat to get in front of!
  13. Superhawkathan

    sportboat performance as seen in Charleston

    I will agree with you here, that as long as boats are kept in a similar class as each other rating systems seem to be more fair. We experienced this in Key West when we were pitted against big offshore machines in our little sport boat. For Charleston we were all pretty much the same, light displacement, and difference of about 6 feet from smallest boat to largest (vice a 30' racing a 44', like we were in Key West). There is a thing on the cert you get called class displacement length and I think it could be helpful in getting classes better put together, but that assumes you have enough entries to make it happen. Its funny because it seems that it always comes back to keeping the boats as similar as possible... (one design), but some of us don't have the luxury of having a well established class anymore or ever did have a class, so for now we just have to keep playing the rating game. I think the one thing that ORC has going from it (I am not to familiar with IRC) is that you have the triple number, though it is not perfect, I believe it is better than the standard 1 PHRF rating. Example PHRF we rate 42 on the Bay here and last year we had 2 GP's (one rated 78 and the other 81) in our club. When the light air hit there was no way that the GP's could stay within 36 - 40 seconds a mile of us, but when the wind picked up and the boats broke out they could easily make that time back up off the wind. With the ORC triple number we owed them roughly 4.5 to 5 min in a 45 min race when using the low rating (less than 9 kts), but when the middle and high numbers were used (9-14 and 14+ kts) the time shrunk to us only owing them a 1.5 min to 2 min in a 45 min race. From looking at all the finish times you can tell that something was working with the rating system; we had light air (really just 1 race) and we had heavy air. As many have stated already it really came down to who could keep their shit in one sock, I know the day we had our worst performance was day 2 and we couldn't seem to get a handle of the boat off the wind! To quote my wife, "it was broach broach city out there!!". It was nice to know that you could be in the hunt for the bullet if you sailed a clean race, rather than thinking that you just need to beat the other boats by just 4 minutes and you were good. No system will ever be perfect and do I think that ORC is the perfect solution, no, but I am a fan of science (which is the supposed backbone of ORC) and not the "well that type of boat has always sailed well on the east coast" rating system. Physics is physics it works the same on whatever coast you are on... Cheers,
  14. Superhawkathan

    sportboat performance as seen in Charleston

    Next step, Screwpile ORC class? I think that would be a hard sell... the bay seems to be pretty committed to PHRF for the moment; even though some Annapolis races have held an or multiple ORC classes. I might ask around and see if it could be in the cards for Screwpile, they might consider it if some other regattas on the bay hop on the wagon like for example Southern Bay Race Week. It seems that right now PHRF has all the controlling interest on the bay and it will be interesting to see how they start handling the data that is being collected and demonstrated by ORC classes, or if they even recognize it. Only time will tell! I think that SBRW is a little too close on the calender to get all the PHRF boats measured and weighed for ORC. The PHRF nazis would have a fit if they couldn't cling to their rating. So far the ORC thing has been great for us on the XP, it just seems to make better sense. Maybe someone close to Solomons could lean on the RC to make a change by mid July. Golly gee, I wonder if there's anyone close by...... Haha, I'll see if I can find LG and bend his ear a little. It may also be out of the cards for this year just due to timing, but doesn't hurt to ask.
  15. Superhawkathan

    Henderson 30?

    So I know that this has been brought up before and figured I could drum up a little conversation on the thread, but thoughts on going to non-overlapping headsails? It could be done and leave the runners in place and set the non-overlapper to the tracks next to the cabin house or you could also get away from the runners by getting more swept spreaders and build a new chain plate gusset in the boat to allow for more sweep and rig support. You could then feasibly get rid of the permanent backstay, go square top and mast head runners, by doing this you bring the center of effort back to where it was with the genoa and standard "big" main. You may lose a little light air performance but the boat could be a little more fun and a little cheaper without burning through Genoa's because of bad tacks and such.... just food for thought! (I bet we can get at least 4 people to say then buy a farr 30 and maybe 2 or 3 say buy a melges 32... )