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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

KRC

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About KRC

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    Anarchist
  • Birthday 09/19/1984

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    Seattle, WA

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  1. Junk eMail

    That is why I use two email addresses. One for personal/professional use that I only give to flesh-and-blood people. The other is my junk email. Anytime I order something online, or otherwise have to input an email address on the internet, (e.g., travel reservations) I use the junk address. Works wonderfully.
  2. Round The County 2017

    Hi Anarchists, This may be a long shot, but worth a try anyways: At the tent party on Saturday in Roche Harbor, someone made off with my jacket (I hope by accident). It is a black Musto jacket with my name on the inside. On the left breast, there is a dove logo with "Pax3 J109" embroidered underneath. The last I saw it, it was on a chair in the dining area of the tent, close to the BBQ area. If anyone here does happen to be in possession of it, please PM me to make arrangements to return it. I'd also appreciate it if anyone reading this could pass it on to fellow crew as well to get as many eyes on it as possible. Sincerest thanks, KRC
  3. Modified Dip Pole?

    Switching to bridle-only is a recent change for us. Originally, we had both a bridle and the original line for the topping lift from the outboard end of the pole. We used that line when flying the sym, and the bridle for the asym. We decided to do away with the original topping lift line on the pole to simplify things and have just one attachment point for the topping lift, regardless of which sail we're using. It makes sense for us because: 1.) we fly the asym much more often than the sym, 2.) it's a carbon pole, so leverage isn't too big an issue, and 3.) because of the leverage, when gybing with the sym there is less movement required of the topping lift for the pole to clear the headstay (less to be eased and then taken back up). The mastman can also jump it if needed.
  4. Modified Dip Pole?

    I've done foredeck on boats of all sizes and setups up to 40'. It seems to me that 36-37' is about the threshold where end-for-end starts becoming a lot clumsier than dip-pole. Especially in heavy air when the boat gets roly-poly. We did end-for-end for a while on the 40-footer I currently race on. It still required 2 people on the bow, and it often required Andre the Giant on the mast just the reach the inboard end. And, like others have said, if the guy loads up before you get the pole made -- forget it, you're done. We also fly both sym and asym off the pole. In both cases, topping lift goes to a bridle on top of the pole. We have no bridle on the bottom. Instead, the foreguy just changes position on the deck. Under asym, we run the foreguy to a block stropped to the anchor roller, and the foreguy clips directly onto the spinnaker tack. Under sym, we move the block back to mid-foredeck, just aft of the fwd hatch and foreguy clips onto a small strop on the outboard end of the pole. The key here is having the smallest number of steps to change your setup for when the back of the bus changes their mind about which spin to use and you're three boatlengths away from the mark.
  5. Electrical engineering internship

    I was an engineering intern about 10 years ago. I was paid somewhere in the neighborhood of $14/hr. That was decent pay, considering I was living in Indiana, where a reasonably nice apartment only cost about $300 - $400 a month. Adjust for inflation and geography. Glassdoor is a good starting point, but bear in mind that everything you read on that site is anecdotal...and it's the internet. If she is comparing competing offers, I'd recommend she go to her school's career office and see if they can put her in touch with any alumni who currently work for the companies she is considering. She should then try to set up informational interviews with those folks and ask questions about the company: What is the culture like? Does the company offer personal development programs, like leadership training, etc.? Is there generally a good work/life balance? What is the management like? Do they focus more on employees or the bottom line? What are the company's values? Do the managers embody those values? Does the management inspire/encourage people to perform well, or do they just crack the whip? Is your work challenging/rewarding? Have they worked with interns before? If so, what kind of work did they do? What is a typical day-in-the-life of an intern? Ask for specific examples. Asking questions like these will help her decide which company is the best fit for her.
  6. Crappy Foods Everone Claims to Love

    Natto (pronounced "NOT toe"). Supposedly it has health benefits. But whatever it's supposed to cure or prevent can't be as bad as natto. This is a food that offends all five senses.
  7. Spam Calls on Cell Phone - Getting Even?

    I have an app for my phone called Calls Blacklist. I believe it exists for both iPhone and Android. And it's FREE. It blocks calls from any number that isn't in your contacts list. You can also set it to block text messages from unknown numbers, too. If you are expecting a call from someone who isn't in your contacts, you can put the number on a "white list" in the app and it will let those calls through. Push a button to turn the app on/off entirely. You can buy the pro version for $2 which lets you schedule when the app turns on or off. About three months after I got the app, I had gone from getting about a half dozen calls a day (including weekends) to almost zero. Seems the spammers have given up on me.
  8. An Abortion Question

    The only argument offered by the "pro-choice" crowd is: "Her body, her choice." However, those who argue this point conveniently forget or overlook the fact that she already made one, possibly multiple, choices regarding her own body. She chose, at least once, to not use contraceptives or birth control. And now she has an "unwanted" pregnancy. What they're really arguing for is the freedom to make bad choices and not have to deal with the consequences. In this context, an "unwanted" pregnancy is akin to an alcoholic with "unwanted" liver disease. When you make choices in life, there are consequences, sometimes lifelong consequences. Live with them. Much is also made about whether a fetus is sentient or not. What people on both sides of the argument can agree on is that science hasn't yet conclusively proven, beyond reasonable doubt or skepticism, when a fetus achieves sentience. People accused of crimes are afforded the benefit of the doubt as to their guilt, until their guilt is proven. Why don't fetuses have that same right where their sentience is concerned?
  9. Round The County 2015

    Did my 1st RTC this year on Different Drummer. What a blast on Saturday! We plugged in the kite before the start, but decided to let other boats take the bold step of hoisting theirs first. We watched one of the Bene's in our class try it. They ran into a bit of trouble keeping the boat under the sail, so we decided to wait a little bit longer. When the wind became a little steadier and less puffy, and after making sure we had plenty of runway, we opted to go for it. We saw boatspeeds consistently in the 12's and 13's, with the speedo peaking for the day at 14.1, although Navionics on the iPad insists we did 15 (who am I to argue??). Lots of carnage around us on that first run. Spectacular wipeouts. We dropped the 2S at the gybe around Lawrence Point and swapped kites to the heavy asym, which we carried to the halfway mark. Heading upwind after Patos Island under #3 and reefed main, we watched a couple of boats go by flying remnants of spinnakers from the masthead. Coming into the home stretch the wind dropped down into the low teens and went flukey, so we changed out to the Heavy #1. Finished 2 minutes behind Ptolemy but corrected ahead for 1st place. Damage report: a couple of patches for the mainsail and a jackline that got jammed under the jib car and had to be cut away. All in all, a successful day. We knew Sunday would be light, so we just tried to go for clear air at the start. Unfortunately, that meant being close to the pin end, which we hit. It took us the full thirty minutes of the time limit and then some to exonerate ourselves and get back to striking distance of the start line. Two minutes later, a puff of wind wafted over the line which would have enabled us to start the race. Damn! We had a nice cruise through the islands back to Anacortes, though, and made it in time to see the 3 TP52's sailing up the home stretch towards the finish. Looked like a tight race. Lots of fun despite Sunday's disappointing results. Will be back next year!
  10. newbie bowman tips

    This. I do foredeck on several boats and each skipper/tactician has their own preference. One skipper prefers verbal communication over hand signals. Another skipper is indifferent as to whether I'm on the bow, up the mast, or taking a piss off the stern during the start, so hand signals are a moot point. Still others prefer hand signals, some the same, some different from each other. The bottom line is, ask the brain trust what signals they want you to use. This way, you avoid confusion. My thoughts on a TRL: We used this method on the J/120 I crewed on for 4 years (before the boat was sold). There was a shackle on the tack end, which clipped onto the bail of the tackline shackle. The other end was tied loosely around the shrouds. We were usually short handed, so we didn't have a sewer. Once it became clear which tack we were going to be on when we doused, we untied the TRL and, if necessary, brought it around the forestay to the windward side. Bowman stood by the forestay, mid-bow by the hatch. DUMP the sheet, EASE the tack. Confusing DUMP and EASE often resulted in a bowman (me) nearly getting slung off the boat like a pebble from a sling. Bowman pulls in TRL as tack is being eased, gathers in the foot, and passes this off to mid-bow, who helps drag it all back to the hatch. Once the foot's under control, pit can release halyard. This method works fine in light or heavy air, and is pretty shrimp-proof because the clew is (should be) loose. The caveat, as mentioned before, is that the driver MUST drive the boat deep until the foot is under control. The heavier the wind, the deeper the driver must sail. In 20+, you need to be going just about DDW, or else have a bow team comprised of 6 mountain gorillas. If you can't sail deep, then trim the jib to blanket the kite and help collapse it. Not really. As long as you've blown the sheet and tackline entirely the kite should be under control no matter what point of sail you're on. That's the beauty of the technique: It works on almost all points of sail. I think we're talking about different maneuvers here. For a windward assym douse with a tack retrieval line, if you try to do this sailing upwind or on a reach, you must pull the entire sail forward (against the wind) around the headstay. In typical, light-air, Long-Island-Sound wind less than 8-10 kts, you can do it, but it is still harder to do than if you're sailing deep (i.e., less apparent wind). In 10-12+ kts of wind, forget it. Been there, done that (at night, closer to a lee shore than I ever want to be again, and in a building breeze). It's not efficient, and the sail is hardly under control. If you still disagree, I volunteer to be the driver in the scenario PDG suggested in post 715 above. I'll even bring beer
  11. newbie bowman tips

    This. I do foredeck on several boats and each skipper/tactician has their own preference. One skipper prefers verbal communication over hand signals. Another skipper is indifferent as to whether I'm on the bow, up the mast, or taking a piss off the stern during the start, so hand signals are a moot point. Still others prefer hand signals, some the same, some different from each other. The bottom line is, ask the brain trust what signals they want you to use. This way, you avoid confusion. My thoughts on a TRL: We used this method on the J/120 I crewed on for 4 years (before the boat was sold). There was a shackle on the tack end, which clipped onto the bail of the tackline shackle. The other end was tied loosely around the shrouds. We were usually short handed, so we didn't have a sewer. Once it became clear which tack we were going to be on when we doused, we untied the TRL and, if necessary, brought it around the forestay to the windward side. Bowman stood by the forestay, mid-bow by the hatch. DUMP the sheet, EASE the tack. Confusing DUMP and EASE often resulted in a bowman (me) nearly getting slung off the boat like a pebble from a sling. Bowman pulls in TRL as tack is being eased, gathers in the foot, and passes this off to mid-bow, who helps drag it all back to the hatch. Once the foot's under control, pit can release halyard. This method works fine in light or heavy air, and is pretty shrimp-proof because the clew is (should be) loose. The caveat, as mentioned before, is that the driver MUST drive the boat deep until the foot is under control. The heavier the wind, the deeper the driver must sail. In 20+, you need to be going just about DDW, or else have a bow team comprised of 6 mountain gorillas. If you can't sail deep, then trim the jib to blanket the kite and help collapse it.
  12. newbie bowman tips

    Yes this question has been asked and answered in this thread. My suggestion is: read the whole thing from the beginning. It's a fun read and educational as well. In short though: When dousing shove/roll the jib forward into the pullpit as has been suggested. When it's time to gybe: you pick up the lazy jib sheet (which is lying on deck to leeward) Trip the sheet off the pole then trip the pole off the mast (this is for light/medium air. Heavy air is slightly different. place the lazy jib sheet over the pole and attach pole to new working spinnaker sheet and help it forward toward the clue. As the pole is coming across so you can attach it to the mast clear the jib sheet off and attach to the mast. Yell "MADE" as loud as you can. Repeat for any further gybes. I'm sure I've forgotten something in here but that's why I said to read the thread. There are a couple of differing views on this and in my opinion none of them are wrong so read up, try them all and pick the one that works best for you and get good at it. how big/what kind of boat? Thanks for the tips Loopy. Boat is a Soverel 33. Boat just got a brand new #1, so bunching that one in the bow is less appealing, but the #2 is well past expiration date. #3 rarely gets used, but is probably small enough that it wouldn't need to be shoved forward. Worth it to train the mast man to flake the jib on the way down, or just drop it and get off the bow? There's a balance between the two. Make sure you've rigged a Fuck-U-Later, so you can load the head back through the prefeeder and into the foil. The mast/pit peeps can then snug the jib halyard. Makes hoisting at the next mark faster/easier. Yep, we frac. Looking forward to trying out some of these ideas tonight. May post results later, depending on level of post-race inebriation.
  13. newbie bowman tips

    Yes this question has been asked and answered in this thread. My suggestion is: read the whole thing from the beginning. It's a fun read and educational as well. In short though: When dousing shove/roll the jib forward into the pullpit as has been suggested. When it's time to gybe: you pick up the lazy jib sheet (which is lying on deck to leeward) Trip the sheet off the pole then trip the pole off the mast (this is for light/medium air. Heavy air is slightly different. place the lazy jib sheet over the pole and attach pole to new working spinnaker sheet and help it forward toward the clue. As the pole is coming across so you can attach it to the mast clear the jib sheet off and attach to the mast. Yell "MADE" as loud as you can. Repeat for any further gybes. I'm sure I've forgotten something in here but that's why I said to read the thread. There are a couple of differing views on this and in my opinion none of them are wrong so read up, try them all and pick the one that works best for you and get good at it. how big/what kind of boat? Thanks for the tips Loopy. Boat is a Soverel 33. Boat just got a brand new #1, so bunching that one in the bow is less appealing, but the #2 is well past expiration date. #3 rarely gets used, but is probably small enough that it wouldn't need to be shoved forward. Worth it to train the mast man to flake the jib on the way down, or just drop it and get off the bow?
  14. newbie bowman tips

    Hmm...I like this idea. Keeps the foredeck cleaner too. Will give this a try on Wednesday. I've always preferred the metal shackles for their ease of operation. Even if I get whacked with the "soft shackle", there's still a big metal ring on the clew of the sail to do what the soft shackle allegedly won't. I've generally found that if I'm getting beat over the head with shackles, I'm either not where I should be or the back of the boat is making another attempt on my life. In the latter case, I think I'm legally permitted (obligated?) to reciprocate the abuse verbally and/or physically.
  15. newbie bowman tips

    Don't know if this has been answered here already, so I'll ask anyways: When end-for-end gybing...What do you do with those pesky jibsheets?? This is something I have not been able to figure out and one way or another, I seem to get it wrong most of the time. Here's the scenario. Standard bear-away set leaves you with the jib down on the port side with the starboard sheet running over the bridle in front of the topper. Hunky-dory if you don't have to gybe to get to the leeward mark, which is never. If you gybe and leave the jib sheet on top of the bridle, when you complete the gybe, you now have the sheet looped around the inboard half of the pole. Bad, unless you plan to gybe again, which would leave you back in the original setup. If, when gybing, you drop the jib sheet off the pole, the starboard jib sheet now runs underneath the pole. Also not good since this requires you to either re-run the sheet, or take the pole off the mast before you douse. So...What is the best way to deal with the jib sheets on an end-for-end boat so that you're always sure to be clear to tack after rounding the leeward mark? TIA Edit to add: Owner does not have shackles on the jib sheets. They're the little knob-and-loop type secured with velcro. They take much longer to fasten/unfasten to the clew than any shackle. So when seconds matter, it'll only take me a minute to get the sheets back on.