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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

k76

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About k76

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  1. You're right Dan, I was thinking more sailplan than stick. Looking at the stick I agree that the finn mast is a highly developed piece of equipment. I hope we don't go there though, I think that kind of stick lends itself too well for professional analysis and advanced construction techniques. The Finn and the Europe has shown itself to be classes where you pay someone to develop stuff and that's no fun. But if its fast I'm sure we will go there eventually, me included.
  2. Phil, I both agree and disagree with what you are saying. I think Geoff's point with inertia about the heel axis is important as it will be the trigger for something to happen. For a properly set up rig that something shouold be the topmast flexing &/or square top flexing out, twisting out the top in gusts, lowering the centre of effort of sails and increasing the drive force for the same righting moment. That is something you can't achieve to the same extent just by sheeting out or feathering, and you certainly can't match the reaction time. It won't last very long, in longer gusts you have to take manual action. Maybe we are discussing different timeframes for our gusts?
  3. Danny Boy, Why wouldn't a UNA rig be faster in light air? I've always pictured a fast UNA rig for an IC as something A class like (like the rig Steve found didn't really work although it looks good). Anyway, based on a rig like that: (all upwind) In really light air the benefit of having more sail area up high surely would outweight any advantage from the two sails having a higher effiency? In light to medium wind the two sail boat has the jib sheeted so tight that you are in marginal territory with the slot anyway. Once the slot gets too narrow you might as well not have the jib. You just end up with a very flat main to stop it backwinding. In this wind range you are still benefiting from more wind and better apparent wind angle up high too. Once you start to depower the two sail rig is conceptually better with a lower center of effort and the slot is in the effective range. I understand a triangular finn style sail would have a lower center of effort so all of the above doesn't apply. But is that the right way to go remembering that the canoe has relatively much more righting moment/sail area than a finn?
  4. Frank, I'm not a believer, but maybe that's just because I haven't seen any results from it. We haven't seen any results from it because of RRS 54: 54 FORESTAYS AND HEADSAIL TACKS Forestays and headsail tacks, except those of spinnaker staysails when the boat is not close-hauled, shall be attached approximately on a boat’s centreline. I'm not sure how much you can push the "approximately" but there is some opening for interpretation there. I think I remember some arguments in the IOM class, where someone attached their forestay at the hull bottom and let it pass through an oval hole in the deck. That boat apart, the model boats are actually doing the opposite, pulling their tack to windward because of their jib boom setup. If that really had an adverse effect on performance I think they would have found another way to sheet their jibs.
  5. I think what is a big deal with the canoe is getting everything right and sorted. A gybing board is another thing on the list, and lets face it, we all struggle to find the time to sort our boats out. Spending time on improving your rig and sails and making sure you can sail a regatta series without any kind of equipment failure is probably time better spent than messing with a gybing board. (But not as fun!!!) The other thing I sort of hinted about in my last post is that a simple but good conventional board is better than a badly designed and/or built gybing board. If you have a 100% reliable setup (and you can stop congratulating yourself about that while sailing) I don't see that it will detract you much while sailing though.
  6. Jim C, You are almost right that the gybing angle only affects the angle of the hull. The little bit that you are missing is that this is the big deal. The hull is providing sideforce, and with that comes drag. For small angles of attack you actually get a useful sideforce at almost no drag penalty, but for larger angles of attack its shortcomings as a lifting surface become evident. So although you can theoretically gybe the board to give zero leeway of the hull you are just giving away your "free" lift. Gybing the board even further to "claw" your way up just means your hull is counteracting the board, its a fantasy that doesn't work. What works is this: Have your hull at the optimum angle. I'm not sure exactly what it is, but its more than zero degrees and less than the optimum angle of a non-gybing board. If you are trying to achieve the optimum angle of the hull with a conventional board you immediately run into a tradeoff of having to increase the size of the board, which gives you more drag from the board. A gybing board or a trim tab allows you to decouple this by providing more lift at small angles of attack with less overall drag. A secondary effect is that you are now free to chase the optimum loading on your foil for achieving laminar flow. It may even be the more important effect. So just gybing a big NACA00XX board may not give you much effect, but Oliver is making the right noises by using a smaller board with a good section. And then the rudder size and rig position comes into play as the sideforce is shared between the keel and the rudder. I don't think this is ever going to be a copy and paste excersize given the differences in our boats. To sum up the gains to be had are: Less drag from hull, less leeway(never zero) and less drag from board.
  7. Hi all, Sorry I couldn't make it to the worlds, but congrats to you all. Thanks for everyone's writeups on the DC designs. Was there any great differences in the relative performance of the boats in different conditions? I always expected Chris' machine to be a killer in a blow, but that maybe the narrower stern designs would have their day in lighter conditions? Or is the crossover windspeed so low as to be irrelevant? Same thing with the UNA rig, did it show promise in the lighter conditions?
  8. I'll make sure I don't miss it, but most likely I'll be part of it as a crew. K76