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    Kiel, Germany

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    Pros and cons of sailing to see the world vs other means.

    We are just going on a four month sailing/parental leave. Actually I think what you describe is really more expensive, because you have to sustain two (possibly expensive) lifestyles at the same time. Just leaving for a few month I need to keep up with the rent for the appartment, pay for the car, ... while at the same time having no income. So for me it would be more sustainable to leave for longer periods and selling off the land- based stuff complete. But I guess that only makes sense if leaving for at least 12-24 month. Paul
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    continous furler line - hardware in the cockpit

    Colligo Marine's ELHF uses clamped cables and they seem to be pretty structural to me. http://www.colligomarine.com/shop-all/71sm4f6qh2ztuhf3s0pn8bcms47q10 t least I hope that they are, because otherwise I should fear for my rig starting this season. @RImike Are you saying, that Colligo sells a product, that is not fit for the advertised use? Paul
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    Corsair 970

    @Sheetinmaxout: Try the Yahoo F-Boat group. There are multiple 970 owners on that list. Paul
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    Corsair 970

    Production boats are overrated... Multihulls Direct builds to a high standard, and some of the home-builds are way above production boat quality as well. I looked at the 970 before buying my current boat and decided against it. The current generation Farrier boats of that size (32/33) offer more space even in the narrow version because of the updated beam attachments. With the wider X version it's no comparison. If I lived in Italy or another place where wide-load permits are hard to get, I might have chosen differently. BTW, the current Dragonfly 28 is trailerable without dismounting and much larger than it's nomimal 28 feet. It's nearly as big inside as a Corsair 31 - weight and sail area are in a similar ballpark as well, just in a shorter package, if I remember correctly. Paul
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    continous furler line - hardware in the cockpit

    What definition of a structural are you using there? Why don't you think that a clamped cable can be structual? Paul
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    continous furler line - hardware in the cockpit

    I have the feeling, that we are both missing each other's point. :-) When furled, the continous line has to be pulled tight and secured into both directions. If you only cleat one "side", there wouldn't be enough grip of the line around the drum to keep the continous line from slipping. To cleat both sides means either jamming both lines into one cam-cleat (might slip because of twisted/entangled line) or having two cam cleats, as shown above. @joe.barry Thanks a lot! Paul
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    continous furler line - hardware in the cockpit

    I am not sure that a single cam cleat can hold both lines (or rather both parts of the continous line) securely at the same time. Anyway, John suggested a simple horn cleat without any additional tensioning system. I'll try that. Paul
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    continous furler line - hardware in the cockpit

    @Rasputin22 18sqm jib on a Farrier F32. I just spoke to John. He says, that his furling unit is designed so that it shouldn't need a block+bungee if used with the supplied drive line. That should simplify things. I'll try it out and report. Paul
  9. I am currently replacing my worn-out Harken furling system with an structural furler by Colligo. The new furler has a continous furling drive line. What is the best way to handle the line from the cockpit? Google image search doesn't give me any hints. I am thinking about simlpe adding two cam cleats next to each other, with the furling drive line extending about 1m behind the cleats. Or does the line need to be tensioned with a bungee cord ? What are other people using? Paul
  10. There is no arguing, that going in/behind the skerries in Sweden offers many more possibilites (and that the area is stunningly beautiful). That's one of the reasons we got a faster boat - to have the Swedish coast within easy reach. :-) But at least in the southern part of Denmark, there are really a lot of options to anchor out, especially if you have a cat with a shallow draft and the wind direction is relatively stable. Just look at the coverage provided by many of small islands south of Fyn. To name a few good places: Dyvig, Mjelsvig, Albuen, Langör, Lyö, Lindelse, Thurö Bund, ... Germany is harder, but has a a few good places as well, i.e. in the Schlei or around Rügen. But then in Germany many marinas are big enough to provide room for a catamaran. Paul
  11. IMHO Denmark has loads of good anchoring places. It's just that no one uses them. Paul
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    "Brainwashing" my wife into cruising!

    I might have to report you to the authorities. :-) Paul
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    2019 AZAB Race

    Sounds very interesting. Would like to race. Is there an easy way to fulfill or get around the OSR category 1 rules regarding escape hatches (no free space, could only add one inside a cabinet) and CE certification (home built)? Boat is a Farrier F-32 RX. Paul
  14. A 25 would definitely be very interesting, but I can only find the Dragonfly 35 Merlin - ten feet and a few tons larger... Paul
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    Mini Transat 2017

    I think the water makers will not work properly, once the boat start to plane. Paul