r.finn

Members
  • Content Count

    1,856
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

403 F'n Saint

3 Followers

About r.finn

  • Rank
    Super Anarchist

Recent Profile Visitors

11,516 profile views
  1. r.finn

    NY to SFO the hard way

    Yeah, I've always hated waves. Whenever I hear someone talk about how fast their boat is, I smile and nod, but what I'm really thinking is "yeah, but what about in waves?". Anxiety has always had the most comfortable birth on the boat. That will always be the case. Not familiar with Forss'. WSSRC: I guess it made sense before everyone had trackers, but today I have 2 trackers, no engine, and when I arrive in SF will anyone really tell me that the voyage was illegitimate? If so, I'm not sure who that will be a problem for, but it won't be me. I feel that their fee is better spent getting Jzerro ready again.
  2. r.finn

    NY to SFO the hard way

    No marks, no answer.
  3. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    I grew up skateboarding. I'm Goofy footed (port tack) but did flip tricks switch, I mean, starboard, so maybe this always made sense.
  4. r.finn

    NY to SFO the hard way

    Sure, but I made Jzerro's crater ;).
  5. r.finn

    ICEBERGS!

    Here's the one I want to use for my social media page. Think it will work?
  6. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    I cannot find a picture of it, but in the 90's there was a successful 60+/- foot tacking proa that won a handful of races in the Med but was lost during a transatlantic race. It was yellow with large, round beam sections and very wide. Anyone know the boat I'm thinking of?
  7. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    HarryProa may claim to be the Ed's clickbait on this thread, but it's definitely SeaGul.
  8. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    Gorgeous! http://www.tackingoutrigger.com/vaa_motu.html
  9. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    Sounds great! How much?
  10. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    2002 Route du Rhum
  11. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    Thanks for the support. We did race against an F31R and they were clearly faster than us in light air out of the bay. We had a strategic difference that benefited us, so it wasn't apples for apples during the first 24 hours. They stayed closer to rhumbline and we went as far east as we could. 24 hours into it they were ahead DTF, but only a little further south than us (Pensacola to Isla Mujeres). We rolled the dice on a big shift filling in from the East and we both sailed most of the night in very light wind that first night. By day break the wind began it's 270 degree swing to the east, and we were over 20 miles E of the F32R after it settled in. So we benefited from the new wind for longer and actually saw their silhouette to the west, at dusk the second night. That evening we crossed the northern end of the Gulf Stream "loop" and inside the loop there was (as usual) a really nasty sea state. Short waves from every direction. Jzerro happily romped through there but it was very unpleasant for the crew. Because of our lee hull having high freeboard, no water came over the prow. Having sailed trimarans a bit I knew they would be having to slow down to A. keep their sanity and B. safely keep their ama from diving. We kept our bow E of rhumbline in anticipation of the header. On the third night I saw their silhouette on the horizon behind us as we both set up for a night of unstable showers from the SE. After sunrise we crossed the GS again on our approach to Isla Mujeres. This was moderate 11-15 knots close to the wind, but not a full beat, in relatively flat water. After reviewing the race tracker, it appears this is where we actually extended the most, the last 60 or 80 miles close hauled in over 10 knots and flat water. We finished two hours ahead of them. So I don't know what that means, but I know they were an experienced team, as I've also seen them at the end of a Pensacola to Havana race and a Chicago Mac race. There was a short tacking duel leaving the Pensacola Bay channel and it was a joke. They were long gone by the time we finished our third tack. The only other big maneuver after that was a gybe the next morning and we were on port tack for the remaining 450 miles. *I didn't pick the proa because it was specifically unique. This record has never been done at all, so I could have chosen a Cape Dory 36 if I wanted, but I wanted to do it quickly with a limited budget and low running costs. A Class 40 is an obvious choice, but I think a vast majority of them would be slower and the price would be way higher to run and own. *Yes, more knots/$. *The Jzerro option was the fastest option for a small budget. *As previously mentioned I would never attempt this on a 3,200 lb trimaran or cat. I don't think their beams are up to task and the boat would be a lot shorter. Honestly it would have to be a pretty robust tri or cat for me to attempt something like this and I'd probably end up on the Cape Dory 36' as the second option, based on budget.
  12. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    Yes, anyone who says that a proa could compete with regular boats on a windward leeward course is either lying or has no idea of what they are talking about. You will not get that argument from me. I would never sign up for a race that was leass than 100 miles due to that handicap. I do not agree with you regarding how vulnerable they are during the tack though. It simply hasn't been my experience. And they are fine for coastal cruising etc... I've done plenty of short tacking under mainsail only to get to a tight spot, but it will never be as easy as tacking your trimaran. Consider this: without the jib, you still have to stop and ease the main 90 degrees, then sheet it it the remaining 90 degrees while going back to upwind course. There is drift and sailing well off of upwind for a considerable part of that maneuver, no matter how quickly you do it. The boat has to go from stop to reverse, reach then upwind, every tack. It's clearly not the type of boat you want SeaGul.
  13. r.finn

    Gyrocopter

    I thought of you when I saw this. Enjoy.
  14. r.finn

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    I can assure you, there is only one way to find out.