WGWarburton

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About WGWarburton

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    Scotland

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  1. WGWarburton

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    So, that'll be a "no", then. Just the usual flawed assumptions, misunderstandings and ignorance. Ah well, sadly it seems you are not alone. Thanks, W.
  2. WGWarburton

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    Do you have a point, Wayne? Thanks, W.
  3. WGWarburton

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    Don't be stupid.
  4. WGWarburton

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    Twitter account no longer exists. Guess that's what happens if you make negative comments about Brexit... threats and intimidation emerge to shut you down. Is this what Britain has come to? Cheers, W.
  5. WGWarburton

    Teaching beginners to trapeze

    Style points available: Cheers, W.
  6. WGWarburton

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    Own it, Wayne. It's a fuck up now, it's going to get worse and it is absolutely and entirely created by the idiocy of Leave. A dazzling example of democracy at its worst. A tyranny of fools. Britain is diminished, we are the poorer for it and it is deeply sad. The least you can do is rejoice in what you have achieved. For you, surely, it is worth the cost to he rest of us? Remind me what the benefits are again, would you? Thanks, W.
  7. WGWarburton

    Fireballs

    Hi Admiral, I'm not sure what's going on with the jib tack? I would expect it to be shackled down to the deck aft of the forestay but there seems to be quite a bit of string in your photo? The Draycote rigging page "Useful Tips 0" would be worth a read. On the halyard rack question... it looks in the photo as if that rack is on the starboard side of the mast? If so, that reinforces the idea that it's likely to be for the main, as the main halyard is traditionally routed to starboard. Cheers, W.
  8. WGWarburton

    Fireballs

    Plus one... I would normally expect that rack to be used for the main halyard, with the luff tension set by the cunningham. Best to swing the rope eye out of the way when it's seated, BTW, to reduce wear. The wire loop should be straight on the hook. (I've not sailed a Fireball yet, though). Cheers, W.
  9. WGWarburton

    Teaching beginners to trapeze

    Check out the reports on dealing with entrapment: RYA guidance with link to report. Notes on recent incident US Sailing report (I'm thinking this is the research Raz'r is referring to). Sail Canada advice . The US sailing report recommends further research into using powerboats to right dinghies but I have not seen anything like that, yet- if there's been further work done and this has been adopted as the technique taught by US Sailing, I'd really like to see the background to that. In general, my understanding is that entrapment is something that should be discussed at a given sailing centre and an appropriate response agreed and shared: the best techniques will depend on variables like the types of dinghies sailed, the types of powerboats in use, the training level of the operators, the local sailing conditions and so on... Cheers, W.
  10. The UK is effectively the same as France, I believe: we downrated from a nominal 250V to 240V a long time ago and then adopted a loose EU standard which includes UK and French nominal voltages within its tolerances. The issue is more to do with frequency than voltage: as detailed upthread, some appliances are quite sensitive to the difference between a European 50Hz and US 60Hz feed. For many services this can easily be fixed by using low voltage DC appliances (also detailed upthread) which often have the advantage of being designed for efficiency in order to maximise battery life. This is impractical for high power draws, though... hence the concern over air conditioning and the washer-dryer... Mark Morwoods approach appeals to me but may not cover the AirCon requirement.. Can you get efficient AirCon that runs off low voltage DC? If so, that seems sound... Otherwise, I think I'd look for a US unit that's intended to be able to cope with an international input, on the grounds that it's more likely to require maintenance later in life when the boat's in the US than when in Europe and maintaining US stuff is likely to be much easier at that point than EU kit... Cheers, W.
  11. WGWarburton

    Teaching beginners to trapeze

    Yes. Especially on skiffs (at least, around here), where there's no air gap to speak of under an inverted hull. My son got one of these: https://crewsaver.com/uk/products/538/ErgoFitSafetyKnife Gill do a similar one: https://www.gillmarine.com/harness-rescue-tool/ but it doesn't come with the handy pouch. Neither will cut wire but (my thinking, at least) is that you can generally unhook from the trapeze, it's getting caught up in dyneema or even shock-cord that can really snag you badly. This design has the advantage that you can slash away in a panic with relatively low risk of stabbing yourself, anyone coming to your aid or a rib tube. It also doesn't need to be fished out of a pocket and unfolded. I've been advised by some 29er folk to put a couple of more conventional knives in sheaths around the boat- one on the transom, at least, where they can be reached in a hurry, too. Cheers, W.
  12. WGWarburton

    How About Some Spring Lines

    Apologies, Jack. Misunderstanding. I meant that the term is universally used on the waterways... all "narrowboaters" use it to mean a place on the bank or a pontoon in a marina (that's another wierd adoption... how can you have a marina in the middle of a field?), or the process of securing the boat to same; by universal, I was trying to make it clear that it's not just a few folk that use the term. You can argue that they use it incorrectly but if the whole community has changed the meaning of the word then it's just dialect or slang or jargon or something (IANALinguist), hence reference to context... the word has a different meaning in that one. Always seems odd to me. Cheers, W.
  13. WGWarburton

    Teaching beginners to trapeze

    Can you point me to the work that drove the adoption of this technique, please? My googling only came up with the RYA recommendations (to right the boat manually), the Canadian ones that followed and supported them and US sailing's contemporary report along the same lines (which recommended more testing of powerboat recovery)... presumably there's been more work done since that has updated the advice to incorporate this. Thanks very much, W.
  14. WGWarburton

    Teaching beginners to trapeze

    "As the boat went over, the 14-year-old crew, Olivia Constants, was telling her skipper she was tangled in something. This turned out to be the trapeze wire to which her harness was accidentally hooked with a connection so awkward the skipper and a sailing instructor were subsequently unable to disconnect it. The response by the sailing instructors was prompt and appropriate, with rapid communications, but despite CPR being administered by several instructors and firemen, Olivia drowned. "
  15. WGWarburton

    Teaching beginners to trapeze

    How would you use the karibiner and line to resolve an entrapment, please? Thanks, W.