JMore

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  1. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Latest from Ales
  2. JMore

    The 2018 Golden Globe Race

    Has anyone got the latest copy of Y&Y for the story?
  3. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Thought I did! Thanks for the clarification.
  4. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    I don't know enough about the history of the Ultime's to make an argument either way, but this race certainly has demonstrated serious issues with the newer, more extreme boats. I may well have misunderstood your point, but I'm not sure about a pattern in the IMOCAs. Alex maintains that he hit something in the VG. Whilst theoretically possible, designing a foil, foil case and hull/deck/bulkhead attachment points that can withstand a UFO strike at full speed is much more difficult in practice. Everything in sailboat design is a compromise of some sort. In this race the IMOCAs have had a variety of different types of failure, mostly non-foil related. No one wants a massively over-engineered race boat, but both followers of, and participants in, any race would surely rather see more boats finish and not have results decided on hardware failure.
  5. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Whilst I've been backing Alex since I found out he entered (and it's brilliant to see him doing so well!) it's a real shame not to get any real indication of Charal's potential. It is a next generation boat and such a different design in many ways that it would have been good to see Beyou being competitive in this race, if not purely for the excitement of close racing. I'm also gutted for Sam Davies. Really wanted her to have a good showing and to qualify for the VG. Other than that the IMOCA race has gone pretty much as expected in terms of top 4. Hoping Alex doesn't have disaster between now and the finish.
  6. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Alan Gautier’s IMOCA analysis from the RdR at 16:49 this afternoon (emphasis mine): It will soon be coming to an end for the leading IMOCA. Ruling supreme, Alex Thomson has kept a good lead over his closest rivals. Paul Meilhat, Vincent Riou and Yann Eliès are fighting it out to make it to the podium, while aiming to be ready to pounce should the British leader show the slightest weakness. On the tenth day of the Route du Rhum, sixteen IMOCAs out of the twenty that set sail are still at sea, although Jérémie Beyou is heading back to Lorient after his electrical power system failed aboard Charal. Today, a previous winner of the Vendée Globe, Alain Gautier, gives us his expert view of the race. “It’s fascinating to watch the battle that is raging between the first four boats. There are two IMOCAs from the 2016 Vendée Globe generation with foils that cannot be adjusted (Hugo Boss and Ucar-StMichel), one equipped with the new generation of adjustable foils (PRB) and one with straight daggerboards (SMA). Quite naturally, we are wondering about the condition of each of these boats. Who is at 100 %? Who is not? We can see that Hugo Boss in general appears to be showing her full potential. On the other hand, there are a lot of questions still about PRB. We’re wondering too which sails each skipper is using. Alex Thomson is still very fast with angles that are not that much worse than his rivals. That raises some questions. What sail configuration is he using to get such a good VMG (compromise between bearing and speed)? “It’s amazing that Alex managed to make his getaway like that” Alex Thomson’s option to the north of the Ushant TSS early in the race gave him a small advantage, but not that much in the end. This year, the gateway to the trade winds was a long way south. Alex nevertheless managed to get back in contact with Paul Meilhat and Vincent Riou and pass in front of them at the latitude of the Canaries. He then got away from them very quickly and has continued to increase his lead. It’s amazing that Alex managed to make his getaway like that. His trajectory has been straighter than his rivals, who have had to carry out more gybes. But above all, it is how he is sailing his boat that has made all the difference. We know that Alex’s foils are especially designed for downwind sailing, but his performance remains remarkable. “SMA will almost certainly be the fastest of the four around Guadeloupe” As we saw with the Ultimes, and more recently with the capsize of the Multi 50, Arkema, you need to remain very vigilant, as there are some violent squalls. As for the race around Guadeloupe, we may be in for some surprises and it is going to be interesting to watch the IMOCAs. Hugo Boss clearly does not appreciate light conditions. Alex Thomson needs therefore to reach the top of the island with as strong a lead as possible. If he manages to keep his current lead (160 miles ahead of Paul Meilhat at noon today), he will be able to relax. Aboard an IMOCA, the gaps do not shrink as fast as with the Ultimes, quite simply because the boats are not as fast and there is a less of a speed difference. The fight for the podium is going to be riveting. SMA will almost certainly be the fastest of the four around Guadeloupe, as straight daggerboards are an advantage in light airs. “Victory by a foreign skipper would benefit the IMOCA class” Alex Thomson may repeat Ellen MacArthur’s achievement of finishing second in the Vendée Globe and winning the following Route du Rhum. Victory by a foreign skipper would benefit the IMOCA class, even if that might not go down as well in Port-la-Forêt! I can see that this year the Figaro racers haven’t been lucky. François Gabart was beaten by Francis Joyon in the Ultime category and for the moment, it is not a Figaro racer that is best placed in the IMOCA class. That is sufficiently rare to be noted. “Seguin, Roura, Le Diraison: a great pack of solid sailors” Boris Herrmann is also having a good race, and is not far behind the leaders. He stuck with his option which allowed him to overtake and then leave the group of Finot-Conq designed boats skippered by Damien Seguin, Alan Roura and Stéphane Le Diraison way behind. These solid sailors form a great pack. They knew they could not aim to win with their older IMOCAs. But in the fight for sixth place, they can push hard aboard their boats which are very similar. Life is good for them. I can’t see Arnaud Boissières catching them, so the three of them will be battling it out to the end. Well done to Erik Nigon and the Finnish sailor, Ari Huusela, who are sailing well. Completing a Route du Rhum is an achievement, as this is a difficult race. That must be what those sailors who carried out pit stops and set off again must be telling themselves. When you take part in a race like the Route du Rhum, you really have to do your utmost to finish, even if you are way down in the rankings. Clocking up the miles sailing solo is always useful. I’m deeply disappointed for the two female skippers who were forced to retire, Isabelle Joschke and Sam Davies, as both of them have had a good season and were unable to show what they can do in the most important race of the year. They miss out on a great experience. But they need to look forward now. They are both strong and talented, so I’m not that worried about them.” Alain Gautier
  7. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Coville has overtaken Pilliard for third. Now just over 10 miles less DTF and way further south. Interesting to see how much further Coville has sailed in the last 24 hours.
  8. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    He has according to the latest sched
  9. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    I don't know what equipment they're carrying for tracking purposes but the tracker does show that AT sailed for ~10 miles at ~350 degrees before changing back to the approximate heading he was on before the manoeuvre. May well have had a minor problem to assess/fix.
  10. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Re the auto translation of Huusela’s collision update, he has put up an English version on his Facebook page: HAPPENED THIS MORNING 6:57 UT Was awake when heard radar alarming. Saw Destremau’s boat on AIS. Called him by VHF two times without getting an answer. His boat was sailing straight towards us with 12-17 knots of speed, depending on gusts. Ran out. Nothing could be done anymore. Got a VHF-answer from Destremau later. He said he had been sleeping without noticing the collision. He thought his autopilot had just stopped working. Pushpit, stanchion and right side hydrogenerator damaged. Possible repairs done. Am continuing the race. Route du Rhum - Destination Guadeloupe IMOCA Globe Series #rdr2018
  11. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Huusela has another cross coming. I hope someone is paying attention this time!
  12. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Apologies - all from Huusela's Facebook feed, reasonably easy to find for those on FB. I haven't found anything anywhere else as yet. I would provide a link but I don't have access to FB on this computer - I read it on my phone earlier.
  13. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    According Facebook Huusela has "damage in the rear railing" so I assume pushpit. Still incredible that two boats can collide in the middle of the Atlantic in a race like this. Sounds lime Destremau (on port) glanced the starboard quarter of Huusela (on starboard). Bloody lucky not to have a proper T-boning situation in such a remote part of the ocean. The mind boggles...
  14. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    AIS? Proper lookout? I haven't been able to find any more details but on the tracker it looks like Huusela was on starboard.
  15. JMore

    Route du Rhum 2018

    Apparently Ari Huusela on Ariel 2 has collided with Sebastian Destremau's Alcatrazit-Faceocean (Rhum Mono). Both sailors ok and able to continue. Anyone got anymore details?