troll99

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  1. troll99

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    he said he knows a lot about CNC. Prob watching his brothers working hard from his mom's view angle You gave away an excellent business idea. Wayne tells that to the family now.
  2. troll99

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    https://industryeurope.com/sectors/transportation/british-car-industry-sees-biggest-sales-slump-in-over-half-a/ British Car Industry Sees Biggest Sales Slump In Over Half A Century Will Waynes family´s CNC company survive? Wayne does nothing except keep sucking both moms tits
  3. troll99

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    Ford doesn't need so much as they like to rust. A floating tin
  4. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    http://www.courseaularge.com/vendee-globe-guillaume-verdier-cela-paye-davoir-un-bateau-polyvalent.html?fbclid=IwAR3_ysCkTcI3GTel1WzWg5F08fxIEfa2CSLVoECgYelSCdsDuAIKH7TUiEs Vendée Globe. Guillaume Verdier: "It pays to have a versatile boat!" January 15, 2021 Share Facebook Twitter Guillaume Verdier with his team is at the forefront of the news with his boats: On the Vendée Globe, we owe him the design of the new generation Apivia and Linked foilers, not to mention those signed with VPLP, Bureau Vallée 2 , Seaexplorer or Maitre CoQ . He is also heavily involved in the design of Team New Zealand's AC75 for the America's Cup and finally it was he who developed the idea of the ultimate offshore flywheel with the Maxi Edmond de Rothschild. He gave himself up during an exciting interview for Apivia. You who are currently in New Zealand alongside Team New Zealand, a team involved in the America's Cup, how do you experience this Vendée Globe from a distance? Guillaume Verdier: “I currently work half of my time with Team New Zealand for the America's Cup for three campaigns, and for the other half with my collaborators, with whom we work on IMOCA, among others. . Of course, that I am this Vendée Globe! I have been working in the Vendée Globe since 1996, when I joined the Finot Group, and since then I have closely followed each of the editions… Moreover, I have never seen conditions like this in the South Seas. Speaking here with the meteorologist from Team New Zealand, who knows the southern seas very well, when he saw the start of the Vendée Globe and the arrival of the boats in the South, he said that the southern summer weather does not was not established at all. He told me that the boats were two or three weeks apart. For him, It must be satisfying to have the two latest generation IMOCAs (APIVIA and LinkedOut) which have always been at the forefront of this 9th edition of the Vendée Globe? GV: “Yes, we are happy, me and the whole team! Moreover, I would like to mention and thank Hervé (Penfornis), Romaric (Neyhousser) and so many others in the firm who have worked a lot on APIVIA. The entire Cabinet worked on this project and I really want to reiterate that. Of course it's better to have our boats in front, but to be honest, it's a mechanical sport and even if it's not like in a car or a motorcycle, and there are two criteria that are very predominant in our sport: meteorology and the human factor. These are two huge factors in sailing… I am also delighted to see that the course of this Vendée Globe does not follow a latest generation logic. This is not always the case, but here we have to do with great sailors. I am also thinking particularly of Damien Seguin who is having an incredible race. It's really remarkable what he does! I can only be in awe of all this… And there, in addition, it's interesting to have so many boats together… We had never seen this! There have been Vendée Globe events where for those in the lead, it was a carpet that was unrolling and not much was happening. There, this is really not the case ”. In the opinion of many, the foilers did not have the best conditions to be able to express themselves fully. Is this your opinion? GV: “The foilers had great conditions on the descent where they were going 2.5 to 3 knots faster. They showed their abilities and arrived a lot ahead in the Saint Helena high. Then, they stayed 5 to 6 days planted… It was really bad luck. In fact, when at one point they could express themselves, they lost all their gain the next move. It's a race that never started from the front and it always came back from behind. For the foils, I think everyone wants to go to the foilers. It is helpful for them to have that throttle button and activate it when they need it. But there, they were caught up each time in the soft. But what's also to be seen is that all of these boats will improve in the future. If luckily, this class does not become a one-design - which would be a pity - we are currently witnessing a kind of Darwinism, a very interesting development for this type of boat. This is what interests us in architecture, seeing the natural evolution of the choices made by sailors to fill a deficit. " What was Charlie's contribution to the design of APIVIA, because on one side there is the skipper and on the other side the naval architect? GV: “Charlie has already been super humble and modest in his approach, which has been very pleasant for us. Then, we did not have clear opinions on everything but we always tried to find solutions, to expose all possible doubts, to exchange as much as possible. For these reasons, it has been very pleasant to work with Charlie on his APIVIA project. Obviously, we speak the same language because we have the same scientific knowledge. Sometimes, we taught him things and other times, it was he who taught us things through his experience and suddenly, the exchange was simple and constructive. We sat down next to each other to draw the foils, to look at the hulls and he came back to me, two days later, to tell me "don't you think if we did like that, wouldn't that be more interesting? ". I never stopped him from doing that… We then went through the hulls in fluid calculation and we looked at the results together. Sometimes, we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we went. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I never stopped him from doing that… We then went through the hulls in fluid calculation and we looked at the results together. Sometimes, we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we went. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I never stopped him from doing that… We then went through the hulls in fluid calculation and we looked at the results together. Sometimes, we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we went. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we moved forward. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " we did not necessarily understand them and therefore, we asked each other the questions ... That's how we moved forward. It was really nice to work with him and very constructive. I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " I think we ended up with the boat he wanted… Whereas very often, paradoxically, we have very little interaction with certain teams. For that, Charlie is extra, because he does not withhold any information, he delivers his feedback intact. The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " The quality of a boat is based on understanding and exchanging with the people who sail or work on it. Success is clearly achieved together! " APIVIA is a so-called versatile boat. How is that decided? GV: “In fact, we think it pays to have a versatile boat. We can see it clearly in this Vendée Globe. It's absolutely the same thing in finance and in investments I imagine. Sometimes it pays off for those who take extreme risks, but in the majority of cases, it loses… I believe that people who invest well are the ones who are very diverse. There, it's a bit the same, we have a multitude of events that happen and if we are that good in one area, we get beheaded! I believe in being able to manage in all conditions and not be deadlocked ”. How exciting is a Vendée Globe project from a naval architecture point of view? GV: “It is precisely all these exchanges that we have and all the pre-project phases that are fascinating. The goal is to understand all the parameters that will create the performance. When we draw, there are several parameters that we classify: performance, safety, ergonomics and maneuverability… In each decision, we try to classify these parameters. What I find fascinating in the classification of these parameters and in the major performance criteria is that we try to give a cost, a value (note, not the financial notion in this sense but the notion of performance) to everything. How much does it cost, for example, for a boat to drift more than 1 degree or less than 1 degree? How much does it cost to have the center of gravity forward 1 meter or back 1 meter? How much does it cost to have the center of thrust of the canopy at 9 meters, 10 or 11 meters? This is called derivative, or the cost of a parameter relative to performance. You might think they are always the same derivatives, but they are not. Because depending on the evolution of the boats, such as when we introduce more efficient foils or sails, and that changes everything. All these parameters are then to be questioned. And that is interesting and fascinating. The ergonomic side is also very interesting. Today, we are at the limit of a sailor's ability to operate his boat. We can also see that we do not use the performance of the boats very well and often they could go much faster. But, the sailors have to sleep, sail, eat… These boats with 4 or 5 sailors, like the Volvo Ocean Race, would be really quite different in terms of performance ”. Are certain ideas already germinating within the Cabinet after reading this Vendée Globe? GV: “We have lots of little ideas that sprout up as we go along and throughout the race. One which is quite interesting and which strikes me is to see that you have to have boats that are good enough to withstand the very strong oversales that they experienced in the South. All the competitors described that when they had thirty knots of established wind, you had to have your hands on the sheets constantly, because that meant slaps at 45 knots… Also, it is not by having a super narrow hull that it's easy to sail downwind in seas like this. The hull must be able to withstand oversold, heavy seas and not lie down in the deep south. This is a subject that I discussed with Kevin Escoffier who told me that it was incredible the slaps he took constantly. The logic towards which we would be tempted to go is to make very very large foils with a completely atrophied hull. But if the foils work well in dynamic conditions, they don't work at all when you are not going fast. And, in a Vendée Globe, there are plenty of different situations with times when we don't go fast and others when we have strong winds and oversales. For me, there is a dimension of boat that must be super strong! I believe that it is this robustness on which it is necessary to work… We see that they waste hours and hours to replace an aerial at the head of the mast, these stories of failing hooks are incredible, and very quickly from the start. start of the race… It's a shame and what's more, it's extremely dangerous. The robustness of the boats in the face of oversold, the robustness of the boats mechanically on parts like those at the top of the mast, in addition to very dangerous access, are tracks on which we must work especially for solo sailing. " What could the IMOCA of tomorrow look like? GV: “Here, we must already clarify all the information, reactions and exchanges that we will have after this Vendée Globe. Then, we have to take up some innovations that we have seen elsewhere, whether in the America's Cup or in kite surfing, certain advances in new materials that would open up new perspectives. All this in order to put on the table all these derivatives I was talking about earlier and find out how we can make a breakthrough. For example, the rig could be a really big breakthrough… If there was a gauge opening on the rig type, that would be an interesting breakthrough. If we could have another keel or another form of keel, it would also be a breakthrough… We try to put all these elements on the table and brainstorm where we throw lots of ideas. Some are interesting to dig into, others are not ... When you obsess over an idea, in general, it does not work. Some people are obsessed with this idea and they just drop everything else. In the end, we have boats that are not homogeneous. We saw crazy things like that in the years 1998, 2000 like at the start of the Boc Challenge with super large boats, not homogeneous at all… ”. Is this exchange of ideas and thoughts also one of the reasons for your presence alongside Team New Zealand at the America's Cup? GV: “You learn a lot by working on different subjects. And I'm fortunate to be able to work alongside Team New Zealand, as well as other people on my team who work for other Cup campaigns. Also, we learn as well in mechanics, as in software, as in profile drawing of foils… We work with programmers who develop specific artificial intelligence software. I give them my objective parameters, the way I design the boats, the criteria that make me design hulls like this or that. I give them to this artificial intelligence software which, overnight, passes them into the calculation of fluids. Seeing this unfold before our eyes is very interesting and in fact, we are learning a lot. The fact of working on a lot of different subjects, whether on the maxi trimaran Gitana, dinghies, or more recently on windsurfing fins, each time we learn something new ... And we find a common point in everything who sails. It is always the balance of three forces, problems of ventilation, cavitation… What we are currently learning about the foil profiles and the rudder profiles is incredible. Tomorrow, the IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on the America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " each time we learn something new… And we find something in common in everything that sails. It is always the balance of three forces, problems of ventilation, cavitation… What we are currently learning about the foil profiles and the rudder profiles is incredible. Tomorrow, the IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on the America's Cup boats. But it also matters for the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… it all comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " each time we learn something new… And we find something in common in everything that sails. It's always the balance of three forces, problems of ventilation, cavitation… What we are learning at the moment about the foil profiles and the rudder profiles is incredible. Tomorrow, the IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on the America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " IMOCAs will have risers like the ones we have on America's Cup boats. But it also affects the shape of the sails and how to adjust them, the structural criteria of the boat… everything necessarily comes down to what we do in IMOCA. " Last question Guillaume, how do you become a naval architect? A childhood dream? GV: “I did a sailing course when I was 8 years old and my teacher went to the naval architecture school in Southampton. I don't know why, but it stuck in a corner of my head… And when I finished Math Sup in Paris, I said to myself: what am I doing here? And why won't I do what I love, which is sailing? I inquired, this school still existed and I went to England. I was also passionate about biology… I was not at all predestined to do this. There are some who are born at the water's edge, who come from families predestined for that. Me, no… We all have very different stories and backgrounds, and that is indisputably what makes each other so rich. " Source Apivia
  5. troll99

    Brexit WTF, WTF

    10. More beer in stock.
  6. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    https://www.prysmianoceanracing.com/news/the-home-straight-for-giancarlo-and-the-1-click-1m-of-cable-projects/ https://electriciens-sans-frontieres.org/ Enough to click on Pedote social networks. https://www.facebook.com/giancarlopedote75/ https://www.giancarlopedote.it/ At the bottom of the page, one can find social networks.
  7. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    I'm more of an introvert too. It is nothing wrong with that as it helps to deal with the environment.
  8. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    Cropped too much earlier. The view of Doldrums. Doldrums winds still strong the whole week. Once past Doldrums, some nice 15kt breeze up to Canaria.
  9. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    Checked again and it is 1400 report date. p.s it is now 1700.. still no difference in Saturday 1300 forecast.
  10. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    West side not good.. even Burton may pass Yannick.
  11. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    Nope, I aim to please PC users with pictures.
  12. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    it was some complaints that some can't read the bigger text therefore I post plain text as well. I cannot please everyone
  13. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    (i missed one thing. The new foilers start to make difference once winds start over 15kn.) Vendée Globe. Nobody can say who will win, everything has to be done again for the leaders! An unprecedented, historic situation in this ninth Vendée Globe! While 81% of the course is in the wake of the top five, there are hardly any gaps between them at all. And very little with the four boats that follow them. With 4600 miles from the finish, no one can tell who will win! Never seen. Louis Burton on Bureau Vallée is wound up like a clock. He can believe it too !. Incredible: to the nearest decimal the top five in the Vendée Globe completed the same percentage of the race's total route on 12 January: 81%… Charlie Dalin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant, Damien Seguin and Louis Burton are all at 4600 miles " and dust ”from the finish in Les Sables-d'Olonne. And the sixth, the German Boris Herrmann is at 80.9% ... The top five completed 81% of the route ... It's completely crazy. This is obviously unheard of on a solo round-the-world race where the odds are often made from Cape Horn, but it is nevertheless so: the first nine of the Vendée Globe fit in a handkerchief of hardly more. 100 miles! This Tuesday January 12, 65 days after the cannon shot in front of Les Sables-d'Olonne on November 8, it's like a new start to which the first five IMOCAs are engaged. In the lead for 17 days, Yannick Bestaven was taken over by the pack. Hard for him but he "does not want to give up." | JEAN-MARIE LIOT / MASTER COQ Charlie Dalin, Damien Seguin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant and Louis Burton - the first five, therefore - are only separated by 25 miles! And they will have to deal with the meteorological instability as far as Recife, the horn of Brazil, to finally race in stable and vigorous south-eastern trade winds. In the meantime, the skippers are busy adjusting, looking for the right gust, observing the squalls in a stifling wetness (over 30 degrees). Energy-guzzling little earner! On the water, there must be pressure differences, and therefore speed differences between the boats. Not easy at all! “The road is straight north but not clear. Until Recife, the northeast trade winds are not stable, there are bubbles with less wind, and variations in strength and direction. On the water, there must be differences in pressure, and therefore in speed, between the boats. Not easy at all! » Explained Sébastien Josse, weather consultant for the Vendée Globe Race Direction this morning. The long solo race is now taking on a different face, that of a regatta in contact between five IMOCAs, if not new by adding Herrmann, Dutreux, Pedote and Le Cam. Charlie Dalin has the cards in hand, will he have the conditions to make the power of his latest generation foiler speak? . | CHARLIE DALIN Will the foils speak? “The chased position of Yannick (Bestaven) is really not easy because he has to hold it. The worst thing is that we risk coming back to everyone because the area of weak wind will go away ” confided King John to the morning session, wound up like a clock, fresh complexion after his very first shower and morale looking good. The gaps in this leading group are unprecedented, perhaps presaging an arrival at Sables-d'Olonne in burst mode. The first nine are held in just 127 miles ... “I have a port foil that I keep going in and out depending on the gusts and which I hope will use me in the hours and days to come,” Yannick Bestaven said at the midday vacation. The appendices of Maître CoQ IV are indeed in their entirety, like those of Bureau Vallée 2, which is not the case with LinkedOut or Apivia. Unless Charlie Dalin brings out the lethal weapon for a few hours to regain the advantage at the right time? Still, if in the powerful trade winds, the advantage of the supporting wings is undeniable, below 15 knots of wind, the differential is minimal. The drift boats will therefore play cards on the tables as far as Recife ... Seventeen in the Atlantic The fleet stretches less than 7,000 miles on Tuesday, and now seventeen IMOCA monohulls have been sailing in the South Atlantic since Pip Hare rounded Cape Horn last night. Two competitors are still shaken: Romain Attanasio (Pure-Best Western) off Montevideo and Alexia Barrier (TSE-4myplanet) 800 miles west of point Nemo. Tonic conditions on chaotic seas for Romain who only has a few more hours, strong wind and waves of over six meters for Alexia who has been eating her black bread for more than 24 hours in the middle of a depression coming from the 'Antarctic. On the Cape Horn side, the next to take the gateway to the Atlantic will be Stéphane Le Diraison (Time for Oceans) and the Spaniard Didac Costa (One planet One ocean). (press service source) Vendée Globe. Nobody can say who will win, everything has to be done again for the leaders! An unprecedented, historic situation in this ninth Vendée Globe! While 81% of the course is in the wake of the top five, there are hardly any gaps between them at all. And very little with the four boats that follow them. With 4600 miles from the finish, no one can tell who will win! Never seen. Louis Burton on Bureau Vallée is wound up like a clock. He can believe it too !. | STEPHANE MAILLARD Show slideshow Sails and Sailboats.Modified 01/12/2021 at 9:31 p.m. Subscribe Incredible: to the nearest decimal the top five in the Vendée Globe completed the same percentage of the race's total route on 12 January: 81%… Charlie Dalin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant, Damien Seguin and Louis Burton are all at 4600 miles " and dust ”from the finish in Les Sables-d'Olonne. And the sixth, the German Boris Herrmann is at 80.9% ... The top five completed 81% of the route ... It's completely crazy. This is obviously unheard of on a solo round-the-world race where the odds are often made from Cape Horn, but it is nevertheless so: the first nine of the Vendée Globe fit in a handkerchief of hardly more. 100 miles! This Tuesday January 12, 65 days after the cannon shot in front of Les Sables-d'Olonne on November 8, it's like a new start to which the first five IMOCAs are engaged. SEE AS WELL Follow the Vendée Globe live on the Vendée Globe map : The match is completely restarted, Dominic Vittet analyzes an incredible suspense In the lead for 17 days, Yannick Bestaven was taken over by the pack. Hard for him but he "does not want to give up." | JEAN-MARIE LIOT / MASTER COQ Charlie Dalin, Damien Seguin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant and Louis Burton - the first five, therefore - are only separated by 25 miles! And they will have to deal with the meteorological instability as far as Recife, the horn of Brazil, to finally race in stable and vigorous south-eastern trade winds. In the meantime, the skippers are busy adjusting, looking for the right gust, observing the squalls in a stifling wetness (over 30 degrees). Energy-guzzling little earner! “The road is straight north but not clear. Until Recife, the northeast trade winds are not stable, there are bubbles with less wind, and variations in strength and direction. On the water, there must be differences in pressure, and therefore in speed, between the boats. Not easy at all! » Explained Sébastien Josse, weather consultant for the Vendée Globe Race Direction this morning. The long solo race is now taking on a different face, that of a regatta in contact between five IMOCAs, if not new by adding Herrmann, Dutreux, Pedote and Le Cam. Subscribe for free to the Voiles et Voiliers Newsletter Join Voiles et Voiliers on Facebook Charlie Dalin has the cards in hand, will he have the conditions to make the power of his latest generation foiler speak? . | CHARLIE DALIN Will the foils speak? “The chased position of Yannick (Bestaven) is really not easy because he has to hold it. The worst thing is that we risk coming back to everyone because the area of weak wind will go away ” confided King John to the morning session, wound up like a clock, fresh complexion after his very first shower and morale looking good. The gaps in this leading group are unprecedented, perhaps presaging an arrival at Sables-d'Olonne in burst mode. The first nine are held in just 127 miles ... “I have a port foil that I keep going in and out depending on the gusts and which I hope will use me in the hours and days to come,” Yannick Bestaven said at the midday vacation. The appendices of Maître CoQ IV are indeed in their entirety, like those of Bureau Vallée 2, which is not the case with LinkedOut or Apivia. Unless Charlie Dalin brings out the lethal weapon for a few hours to regain the advantage at the right time? Still, if in the powerful trade winds, the advantage of the supporting wings is undeniable, below 15 knots of wind, the differential is minimal. The drift boats will therefore play cards on the tables as far as Recife ... Seventeen in the Atlantic The fleet stretches less than 7,000 miles on Tuesday, and now seventeen IMOCA monohulls have been sailing in the South Atlantic since Pip Hare rounded Cape Horn last night. Two competitors are still shaken: Romain Attanasio (Pure-Best Western) off Montevideo and Alexia Barrier (TSE-4myplanet) 800 miles west of point Nemo. Tonic conditions on chaotic seas for Romain who only has a few more hours, strong wind and waves of over six meters for Alexia who has been eating her black bread for more than 24 hours in the middle of a depression coming from the 'Antarctic. On the Cape Horn side, the next to take the gateway to the Atlantic will be Stéphane Le Diraison (Time for Oceans) and the Spaniard Didac Costa (One planet One ocean). (press service source)
  14. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    The rabbit invested in lightweight shoes.
  15. troll99

    Vendee Globe 2020

    Hmm, maybe a youtube video is needed so one can make a deep analysis after. A good question though.