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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

buckeye

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About buckeye

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  1. Fair enough. Just curious. A 30 or 35 footer does have a much better feel upwind than the 70. It is always cool to get a 1d35 dialed in and trucking. Have a great summer and I hope for the continued growth of the class. It fills a much needed void in sailing.
  2. Out of curiosity, why did your boat owner switch classes. If I recall he had a 70 before selling it and getting a C and C 30. He certainly was paying for crew when in the 70 and the boat was always perfectly maintained. Certainly the 70's get more boats on the line and have a greater talent pool than the C and C in numbers alone.
  3. Speaking of Tick Tock, The shirts look great as always Mark. Have a great start to the year.
  4. The problem is your facts are wrong. No weight limit in the j/70 class. That draft of the rules was from around 2012.
  5. Just a simple question. Do any of Jud's other dry sailed boats have bottom paint? Does the etchells? If not please come up with another reason why one would put bottom paint on a dry sailed boat. I did not make the allegation, but I would love to hear an alternate view for the reason. Most have stated that it was a loophole in the rules that allows sanding to allow for bottom paint application. I think the rule was poorly written and allowed this to begin. thanks
  6. They began 2 years ago when dry sailed boats showed up for events with bottom paint! The toothpaste is out of the tube now the question is what to do.
  7. North sails Toledo, aka Dieball sails, can not be too happy!
  8. Was there a final result on all of the PHRF silliness regarding restricted ratings and bow pulpits? I hope so for PHRF's sake.
  9. Great response. You spend time on here complaining that your boat can't compete with sportboats. When was the last time your bottom was templated, or even cleaned. How about new sails, halyards, ect. Or why bother with all that, Just tell another boat that races in every other part of the country and is a club member that he can not sail because he does not have a bow pulpit. Even when last year PHRF gave an older boat an unrestrecte certificate without a bow pulpit. Your right, that is alot easier. Have fun in your dwindling fleet.
  10. It looks like your boat was not signed up. Why was it that your boat failed to register in advance? Sometimes if they are a few more registered early, others may sign up as well. The home club boats should be signed up well in advance to have any chance of boats from other yacht clubs coming.
  11. The boats are still there and they are getting older by the day. A Pearson 30 built in 1978 would now be 35 years old. Its probably about 1000 lbs heavier and not nearly as stiff as designed. How are the sails? I am not sure a boat built in 1940 would have been competitive in 1978 either. There are not a lot of new boats being built these days. At least not in big numbers. That is the bigger problem and it comes back to time and money. I think that handicap racing is shrinking as well in multiple areas for the same reasons. If you think that the fleet would fare any better against a Farr 40 that was drysailed, template, and had a new wardrobe you are mistaken. The Farr is not a sportboat. The grand prix boats are better equipped and prepped and that makes a huge difference. It comes down to money and with the price of new sails and technology, the guy buying one sail every other year is not going to go against a newer boat with a new suit of sails very well. It has less to do with the type of boat and more about the prep. If you look at ratings, the PHRF LE has hammered new boats harder than any other area around. The Melges, Farr 400 and J/70 have the lowest PHRF ratings around. If you look at the jboats rating table, the PHRF commitee follows almost all recommendations and then the only boat hit harder is the new J/70 which is 6 seconds lower with the lowest number in the country. PHRF trys to keep everyone happy, but it is impossible to keep the older and unprepped boats happy. Instead, they are left losing sailors on both ends. The competitive people move to OD and the older boats get left at the dock. I think the only way is to start changing the splits to reflect grand prix vs club race and let the organizers an competitors pick where they want to sail.
  12. My point is that the PHRF rule states that ratings are supposed to reflect a boat in optimum condition ( sails, halyards, bottom finish, ect). That is the rule that these boats supposedly want to sail by. If you can show me one Pearson 30 or similar boat with a templated bottom, dry sailed, with PBO or vectran halyards, and a sail inventory equal to 3dl or 3di I would love to see it. The problem comes from not only the differences in boats, but the differences in boat prep. The boats are still there and they are getting older by the day. A Pearson 30 built in 1978 would now be 35 years old. Its probably about 1000 lbs heavier and not nearly as stiff as designed. How are the sails? I am not sure a boat built in 1940 would have been competitive in 1978 either. There are not a lot of new boats being built these days. At least not in big numbers. That is the bigger problem and it comes back to time and money.
  13. The boats are still there and they are getting older by the day. A Pearson 30 built in 1978 would now be 35 years old. Its probably about 1000 lbs heavier and not nearly as stiff as designed. How are the sails? I am not sure a boat built in 1940 would have been competitive in 1978 either. There are not a lot of new boats being built these days. At least not in big numbers. That is the bigger problem and it comes back to time and money.
  14. I have to agree 100% with this post. The PHRF fleet has taken a hit everywhere with many boats jumping ship. Blame this on PHRF or maybe it is just a rotation in what people want to do with their free time. For us the balance between cost and fun factor was getting out of balance. We downsized and are happier than ever back in OD. Looking forward to a great local fleet and doing some travel events each year for less that we would spend on the big boat before. It looks like other areas like Chicago and Annapolis are having the same issue before them. On the other note, it does make it difficult to plan and line up logistics for a race at the last minute. Between family and work we have every weekend planned months in advance. Not knowing the courses or the date ( Friday vs Sat) made us not do the race last year. Hopefully things bounce back as the more people on the water, the better for all of us.
  15. Why would badfish switch to the short course? An awful lot of boats hitting from the ladies tees. Overkill, Badfish, Hendo 30, FT 10. Why?