Whiskey.T

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About Whiskey.T

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  1. Whiskey.T

    wtf

    Sure, but 4 million euros and hydraulic helms.
  2. Whiskey.T

    Over the horizon

    As far as I know, only a few Catanas have nida-core bulkheads: 471's of late 2001 early 2002, and some 401's which have been modified since by the yard.
  3. Whiskey.T

    GB5508 Rebuild - Soma's Project

    Stunning, really. I used to have a car in that color, or maybe less reddish. I used to call her "pumpkin".
  4. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    What else did you see? Anything interesting or surprising?
  5. Whiskey.T

    Over the horizon

    Yeah, I saw your post on the nida-core thread about this. I believe that some Catanas built in 2001-2002 had nida-core bulkheads. Also some 401s that had been built under contract by Sud Composite (the same builder that built the Switch 51, by the way). Lots of problems and friction between Sud Composite and and Catana, as I remember (long time ago). Anyway, I'm sad you backed out of that 472. Hopefully you'll find something else soon.
  6. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    As @Airwick already mentioned, if you look on the graph for the max VMG, you find it at ~37 deg and it is around 7 knots (in 15kn of wind). But the message I responded to mentioned 8 knots at 30 degrees. That speed is just the speed on the water, not the VMG (let alone max VMG). To find the VMG, you can project on the left axis, or you can multiply the speed by the cosine of the angle. The two methods are mathematically equivalent. I could be wrong of course, that wouldn't be the first time. And also I agree that it isn't super relevant. You're absolutely right that max VMG is more relevant here.
  7. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    Oops, cos(30) = 0.87, so it's not that bad. Still...
  8. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    Not relevant to the general discussion, but maybe there was a contrary current? 3kn currents are common in that location. At 30 deg the VMG is cut in half, minus 3kn because of the current and not much speed is left to get out.
  9. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    Does anybody know where exactly the sheeting points on that J0/FR0 sail are? The sheet go inside the shrouds to ???, the aft beam, not the coachroof, but where exactly? Also, the sheets must run pretty close to the bimini... Just curious.
  10. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    I have experienced situations when having a topping lift to prevent the boom from moving up and down was useful. For example in low wind but large waves, when the mainsail is "breathing" or "pumping" and exerting a heavy dynamic load on blocks and sheets, I find it useful to tighten the topping lift and immobilize the boom.
  11. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    Dang, I also thought there may be a fuel cell or something...
  12. Whiskey.T

    GB5508 Rebuild - Soma's Project

    Wait, maybe I'm misunderstanding something, is wet-layup better than infusion? For all the other items you mentioned, the expensive option is obviously better (other than price), hence the trade-off, but I thought infusion meant less resin, better resin/fiber ratio, less weight, etc.??
  13. Now that I think of it, maybe "fair winds" isn't what you want. I guess what is "fair" is subjective... Me, I like a strong breeze.
  14. Whiskey.T

    Gunboat 68

    Thanks @soma. Another material I know is used for similar applications is Ertalyte. This is what the knuckles in JP3 rudder bearings are made of. Supposedly it doesn't absorb water so it works better in wet environment and tight clearances. On the other hand, Ertalyte seems more brittle than Delrin (feels "cheaper"). Vesconite seems like the best of all worlds.