Gabe_nyc

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About Gabe_nyc

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  1. Gabe_nyc

    Sailpack + Dutchman Anarchy

    Yes, if I do this I would need the flakes to be upwards instead of downwards and I thought of letting it sit in the proper position over the winter to create the proper “memory.”
  2. Gabe_nyc

    Sailpack + Dutchman Anarchy

    Hah! Forgot about that (:-) Lots of water under the bridge since this spring ... As I’ve been thinking further about this since yesterday, lazy jacks perform 2 jobs: 1) they guide the sail into the pack, and 2) together with the pulleys, they open / close the pack so it can accommodate the sail on its way down. If the sides of the pack are attached permanently to the mast at the front, like the Mack Pack example at the top of this thread, the sail might choose to drape around the pack instead of into it. There is still be the need to open up the pack to allow it to receive the sail and then close it up so some kind of pulley system would still be needed. I won’t be able to experiment before hauling out, but I might make a temp sail pack from a cheap tarp or similar that can be opened / closed from a single set of lazy jacks with pulleys attached to either side of the spinnaker ring. If it works I will re-make it with Sunbrella fabric, etc, and if it doesn’t work, I will choose anew between normal lazy jacks arrangement or back to the regular sail cover.
  3. Gabe_nyc

    Sailpack + Dutchman Anarchy

    The lazy jacks keep it inside the pack, but they don’t do anything to make it flake neatly. It seems to me that the SP+DM would have it in the pack flaked more neatly. However, I could be wrong, hence this thread and the appeal to the hive mind of SA.
  4. Gabe_nyc

    Sailpack + Dutchman Anarchy

    These guys (see pic below) attach the front of the pack to the mast with a top hook and toggles. In their case, the lazy jacks take up most of the load, the hooks / toggles are more of an afterthought, so I would have to beef mine up, but otherwise I think it would work. On the other hand, without the lazy jacks to hold them up, the sides of the pack might flop and flutter around and this may create an issue. Yes, 3 separate zipper sections. Not as simple as a single long zipper operated from the cockpit, but a lot easier than the sail ties and sail cover. I thought of lowering the topping lift but that seems like it would get fouled up and create trouble.
  5. Gabe_nyc

    Sailpack + Dutchman Anarchy

    I have a Dutchman system on a 30-ft boat. I don’t like messing with the sail cover on/off etc. I want to put in a sailpack and I’m thinking of combining it with the Dutchman. Con: instead of having a single long zipper, it will require 3 zippers (or toggles?) that get opened closed separately from the cabin top. Pro 1: the sail will flake more neatly inside the pack. Pro 2: no lazy jacks to get fouled / tangled in the battens. Any comments, suggestions, etc are welcomed and appreciated (:-)
  6. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    OMG! First duct tape, and now napkins! Are you from ... the future ? (:-) (:-) Seriously though, yes, I might do something more permanent if I finish my other projects (:-)
  7. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    My mast is keel-stepped. If I reinforce it with some of the miraculous duct tape you speak of, don’t you think I might be able to dispense with these bothersome shrouds altogether? At that point, in order not to over-stress the duct tape, it might behoove me to preferentially sail only on days with following winds, but that’s pretty much every day in Long Island Sound, so no biggie (:-)
  8. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    Sorry, that was there from the previous owner. I don’t know what he used and I haven’t had to use any myself. On the other hand, the rubbery tape that bonds to itself when you stretch it would work pretty well there.
  9. Gabe_nyc

    TLAR* Anarchy

    Both of you are correct. I think that for this season I will look for a cheap 6-10 hp outboard and sort out payload / handling etc. If it appears promising I will work on converting to electric for next spring. A fellow Anarchist in U.K. converted the same cat to power and gets 20kts from 25hp but I will be happy w 10(ish) kts.
  10. Gabe_nyc

    TLAR* Anarchy

    Thank you. That is a valid point. I realize that this would be a very crude procedure, but it would be only in very flat water to start with. My marina is literally next door to the US Merchant Marine Academy and ordinarily I might chat up some of their folks, but COVID makes casual approaches like that unwelcome ...
  11. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    That is a valid point. Nonetheless, I am pretty sure that my current solution will last at least until the end of the season, and I just do not see what there is to be gained at this point by buying all new unslotted washers and getting them installed in the limited time left. Re my “reluctance” to mess with stuff, a couple of years ago I wanted to take off the deck-stepped mast on my previous boat (28-ft). My yard does not have a crane so I made my own gin-pole to unstep / step the mast and it worked great even though I had found no instructions etc for making one. Here is a picture of me and a few friends bringing it down (I am the good-looking one) (:-)
  12. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    I appreciate the willingness to help. 1 - this season had a very late season start 2 - I had a few other bigger projects before splashing 3 - I am a bit of COVID refugee and temporarily much further from the boat than previous 4 - if you look at the screws holding the plates to the deck you will see that they are somewhat mismatched and not 100% square. ———— So here is my decidedly non-phobic summing up of all relevant factors: I’ve done my share of crawling in the bilge etc for this season (see some of my other threads). If I can avoid doing something until after haul-out, I will do so. I will not be doing too much sailing from now through the end of the season. Just like work/life balance is a thing, sail/work balance is a thing too (:-) There is internal evidence of past leaks around the chainplates. They are dry right now, but the sloppy screw heads warn me that a proverbial can of worms may well await there. I am profoundly envious off all those who have never had “a small thing” turn into “a big thing” at a time and place that was ... ahem ... inopportune. Alas, I have not been as fortunate, and because of that, I have learned to (sometimes) exercise discretion before plunging along with minor-but-optional jobs.
  13. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    I started this whole thread trying to get the clevis flush on the outside so the jib sheets won’t hang up. All good points, but I did not want, and did not, touch the turnbuckles, the clevis pins or the cotter pins. I gently eased the clevis pins to one side with a large screwdriver when they were unloaded on the lee side, cut slots in the washers (see pics) and slipped the slotted washers over the pins. Quick, easy and zero chance of mishap.
  14. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    At this point in the season I did not want to disconnect the shrouds or do anything else where I might drop a clevis pin over the side etc. I got some large washers, cut a slot in them with a razor saw (easily the most dangerous tool I own) (:-) and pushed them in place. The slot is sized so that determined effort is required to push them in position. There is some theoretical chance that they might get squeezed out but I doubt it. There is a bit of slop left in the clevis and the pin might push out a little again, but I don’t think it will be enough to snag anything.
  15. Gabe_nyc

    Turnbuckle Cover Anarchy

    What my next attempt will be is to insert large nylon washers on the inboard side of the pin so as to keep the clevis flush with the chainplate. This would be unobtrusive and it would make it impossible for the sheets to snag. I am hoping that this works, and will decide afterward whether to also cover the turnbuckles further.