Tylo

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About Tylo

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  1. Tylo

    Cat tails from over the horizon

    I think it depends on what kind of rigging we’re talking about. The crazy carbon and Kevlar rigging on super yachts and racing yachts is obviously beyond the reach of most of us mortals but dyneema rigging seems like a pretty realistic offering. I’ve seen quite a few youtubers make the change as well so it’s definitely out there. In the end I think it’s just because sailors in general are fond of the “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”-mentality (which there’s nothing wrong with) and having metal holding up the mast gives people a sense of security they don’t get with dyneema (yet). There are some nice write-ups on sailmagazine where an owner converted to dyneema, see the following links: https://www.sailmagazine.com/diy/dynex-dux-across-the-atlantic https://www.sailmagazine.com/diy/dynex-dux-fiber-rigging-after-6000-sea-miles It looks like they run it unprotected from chafe and UV, and still manage chafe fine and found that after 6000 miles the shrouds had lost 21 and 32% of their strength due to UV and chafe, but even with these losses they were still twice as strong as the stainless rigging they replaced. There are UV and chafe protection sleeves that I would definitely use at least, even though it might not be strictly necessary. I don’t think dyneema is the 2nd coming of Christ or anything but it’s pretty cool to have a reasonably priced synthetic alternative for the rig.
  2. Tylo

    Cat tails from over the horizon

    What kind of synthetic rigging is on the boats? I’ve been reading up on Dyneema rigging and have heard that replacing stainless with it costs roughly the same as buying new stainless stuff, but only due to having to buy all the unique hardware (thimbals, terminators, end fittings and so on) but when time comes to renew, and you only need to renew the line itself, it’s a lot cheaper. Also, since you dimension it’s for creep rather than for breaking strength, there’s a HUGE safety margin in terms of breaking strength while still saving a lot of weight. Doesn’t have to make it true but thats what I heard. The weight savings compared with the future price savings and the ease of serviceability (learn how to splice it, keep a spool with you and you can replace a shroud on your own anywhere in the world) means I’ll definitely be trying it out on my next boat.
  3. Tylo

    Cat tails from over the horizon

    I've asked myself the same question a lot. Mast building seems like one of those dark arts and it's difficult to find weight numbers. In this case I would probably assume Craig Schionning knew what he was doing; from the pics on the Schionning website it looks like he built the mast while building the boat. In that case I'd assume it's as light, or lighter, than a comparable alu mast. Since the ad lists it as "Western red cedar with e-glass and carbon", I'd assume it's a sandwich construction of WRC and e-glass with carbon fiber reinforcements. This one has also been built with no spreaders, just a forestay and two aft-mounted shrouds per side. This would at the very least remove some windage and points of failure compared to a rig with diamonds. I have no idea if it comes out as a weight saving aloft, but maybe. True. You'd have to get a very good surveyor to make sure it isn't wet and then make sure to always keep on top of it in terms of properly installing fittings and quickly sealing any unfortunate punctures in the outer skin. I've become more relaxed about wood cored boats after seeing how many of them there are out there; as long as it's been properly taken care of and kept dry prior to my ownership I know I'd spend the time and effort to make sure it stays dry. Sure, it'd be great with a foam cored boat for all the advantages they offer, but they're both rarer and more expensive. Yeah, it's kind of odd. A few reasons for moving the crossbeam aft would be reduced windage and to get the anchor and chain closer to the center of gravity. The trade-off is less trampoline space and different loads on the hulls. The "no crossbeam"-topic was discussed a bit in this thread about a 72' Chris White that has no crossbeam at all: http://forums.sailinganarchy.com/index.php?/topic/183153-chris-white-carbon-70ft-cat-w-freestanding-rig/ and I'm sure it's been discussed somewhere at length with regards to the Gunboat 55/57 when they came out. The hulls have a very unique shape as you say and they're the reason I'm guessing it's an Oram design, they look very similar to the hulls on "Ciao Bella" (which was listed as an Oram 60) that was for sale a few months ago:
  4. Tylo

    Cat tails from over the horizon

    Oh and here's another cool cat; "Richard Edlin built" 58 footer: https://yachthub.com/list/boats-for-sale/used/sail-catamarans/richard-edlin-built/241639 There's no mention of a designer anywhere but the hulls remind me of the ones on the Oram 60 in post #33 in this topic. No mention of a displacement either but the beam to length ratio on those hulls looks good. It looks very well fitted out too.
  5. Tylo

    Cat tails from over the horizon

    Schionning Waterline 1480 "Barrocka" is back on the market after less than a year I think...? https://yachthub.com/list/yachts-for-sale/used/sail-catamarans/schionning-waterline-1480/242678 Definitely one of my favorite cats out there. I think it was listed at AU$525k last time but I don't know what it sold for. The current owners seem to have bought new anchor chain, fitted a new chart plotter and put ~100 hrs on the engines, asking AU$529k. It was on the market a long time last time so it'll be interesting to see what happens now.
  6. Tylo

    ARC / ARC+ 2019 - Multihulls

    Yes I noticed that too, I was hoping they just wanted to go to Martinique instead of St Lucia and that it wasn't an emergency. Very cool to see Hallucine come in ahead of the VO65. Even though the VO65 was probably in "delivery mode" it still ought to be a very fast mono.
  7. Tylo

    ARC / ARC+ 2019 - Multihulls

    It's also very cool to see what a huge difference tactics and routing can have. While we won't know what kinds of sails etc they used, comparing the routes of TS5 Hallucine and Amalia and their current (very different) positions is interesting to say the least. Amalia never went as far south as Hallucine, presumably opting for a shorter route while Hallucine went for a longer route but followed the wind. As a result Amalia has rarely seen speeds above 10 knots while Hallucine has been well into the teens most of the way across. I'm also surprised at how "average" the speed of the production cats has been, even in a tradewind scenario like this. For sheer crossing speed it looks like you're better off spending the same money on a longer monohull. Then again, for an Atlantic crossing I guess it's possible people overload their cats with provisions, spare parts and other stuff, slowing them down significantly. Also, the people on cats may well be more comfortable and they'll certainly have more deck space to enjoy if the weather is good.
  8. Tylo

    Older fast Aus multies

    Assuming there's nothing structurally wrong with her I think it's just a fairly unique boat that needs to find a fairly unique buyer. She's very wide, almost 10m long and has very limited accommodations. Top that off with the canting rig and I think the only people who could justify buying her are serious racers, and I guess they have their hands full. There's a similar one in Europe that has been for sale for a very, very long time as well. This one is non-folding with a fixed rig and and boards in the floats though: https://www.multihull.nl/multihulls/used-multihulls/79160.grainger10m/graingerTR10.buitenfotos.html
  9. Tylo

    Older fast Aus multies

    Now that's some pretty canvas, and what a mast as well! Awesome picture.
  10. Tylo

    Best folding prop?

    I don't know if you've come across this already but here's a pretty big test of many folding props in Yachting Monthly: https://www.yachtingmonthly.com/gear/folding-and-feathering-propeller-test-29807 Unfortunately they couldn't bring themselves to name a winner but there's some valuable performance data in there at least.
  11. Tylo

    Classic Submariner?

    Reminds me of this scene:
  12. Tylo

    Cat tails from over the horizon

    There's a Grainger Chincogan 52 with daggerboards and twin helms for sale. These normally come with mini-keels and single helms I think. https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2002/grainger-chincogan-52-3594827/ Not sure if the 12t listed displacement is light or loaded, or something in between. I found another document listing light as 8.8t and loaded as 11.7t for a mini-keel version. That document also claims foam core.
  13. Tylo

    Chartering in Croatia

    Yeah, you're absolutely right. We assumed there would be some issues and actually asked them about it before signing any contracts. Here are the screenshots from our email conversation with them about the boat: We asked them: They replied: So we expected wear and tear but we didn't expect a bunch of stuff to be broken. But you live and you learn, so next year we've booked a newer boat and we've booked through Euromarine. The guy who organized the trip has chartered through them before and been very happy with it. I think the reason we didn't end up chartering through them this year was because we were a bit late to book so it was our fault. I haven't heard about PlainSailing, we found the boat through Boataround I think, but I'll be sure to check out PlainSailing in the future.
  14. Tylo

    Chartering in Croatia

    Here's the dock in Zuljana, the motorboat in front of us was a local. We had to move when the local diveboats came in but they were kind enough to let us raft up outside them for the night provided we were gone by 10 am the next day, you can just about see the bow of it behind our boat. Here's the next bay where people who came in late to Zuljana went. Interesting note - the little trawler-looking thing was US-registered American Tug 27 if I recall correctly. I assume they had shipped it over the Atlantic to cruise the med - really cool! Here's a picture of Okuklje from one of the vantage points. Again, more boats than I remember but didn't really feel crowded at all. There was a group of middle-aged Germans on a Hanse 630 who provided us with the evening's entertainment by sending everyone in the crew up the mast one by one. Lastly, here's a picture from one of our anchorages where I tried to show the color and clarity of the water. Maybe not the best picture but the visibility was easily 20+ meters and I could have sworn I was able to make out sand vs rock/seagrass bottoms in what we think was somewhere between 30 and 40 meters. Not entirely sure what the actual depth was due to the sounder not working at those depths etc.
  15. Tylo

    Chartering in Croatia

    No problems! Favorite island is hard to say between Mljet and Lastovo. Northern Mljet had some fantastic islands to cruise around which was really beautiful. Western Lastovo was similar and really nice too. The downside to these areas is that they are national parks and require permits to anchor/use mooring balls. If memory serves me right we would have had to pay 80 euros on Mljet for our 38 ft boat for the night - a little too pricey for us, so we used a restaurant mooring there instead. For anyone who doesn't know, a restaurant mooring is a dock owned by a restaurant where you can moor for free if you eat at the restaurant that night. Most provide shore power and you can use their toilets until the restaurant closes. Some even provide water to refill your tanks or showers. We spent about 50 euros on a grilled squid dinner and beer for the three of us instead of paying 80 euros to anchor. On Lastovo the permit-enforcers drove around in an unmarked RIB looking for boats to sell permits to. Although the permit was cheaper, around 25 euros I think, we ended up using a public dock here anyway as strong winds were forecast for the night. We didn't stay in many cities but the one I liked most is called Zuljana, it's on the peninsula. It was us and one other tourist boat - we both rafted up outside two local boats and because that's the only spot we could take. The restaurant had some of the best and cheapest food and drink we had the entire week and there were nice hiking trails around the town. We also stayed in a wonderful place called Okuklje on Mljet which I fully recommend, it was very protected and really beautiful. Some nice hiking trails and vantage points around it. Looking at the picture now I realize there were a bit more than 3-4 boats that night but at least it didn't feel crowded. The main problems were boat maintenance. We were told there were no issues with the boat but when we got there it was a different story. First of all the forward hatch was missing one of the two handles, meaning it only closed properly on one side. We regarded this as straight up dangerous as a wave over the bow would probably have ripped that hatch open easily. It also leaked in rain. The big hatch in the main salon was missing one of four handles and leaked as a result of this. The depth sounder didn't work when we arrived. We said we'd like to have it working and asked if they could fix it. Four hours and the same number of "technicians" (only one of whom spoke English) later we left with a broken depth sounder and discovered the log wasn't working either. When we checked it later it turned out they had replaced the transducer for the log instead of the one for the depth sounder and had somehow mounted the new one with the "forward" arrow facing the port stern quarter... We also got the depth sounder working by scraping all the growth off the transducer. Sadly the wire for it had been spliced three times on the way to the controller so the signal was too weak to work in depths over 20 meters, but it worked where we needed it. The running rigging was really old and the control line for the boom vang broke while we were out. The water tank gauges didn't work, nor did the cockpit speakers and half the power outlets. There were a lot of weird electrical problems on it. If we'd been informed about the problems when we asked it wouldn't have been such a let-down, and if they had a competent technician (or had just been honest and said "we don't know how to fix it") then we could have saved four hours pacing back and forth on the docks in the 90+ degree heat.