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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

random house sailor

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About random house sailor

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  • Birthday 12/04/1989

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  1. R2AK 2016

    Don't forget we are mainly sailing on our leeward c-foil at sufficient speed and the horizontal winglets on the rudders take maybe 1/6 of the load(rough guess). The c-foil is what carries us across the troughs on the short stacked waves. I actually found it more difficult to drive in the more spread apart swell versus the upwind current squared chop that we had for most of johnstone strait. Sounds weird but it was way easier to get the boat to foil from crest to crest as they were only 15 feet across. The balance of the foils kept the boat relatively steady through that period and I'm certain a stock m32 without rudder winglets would have been chopping wood much much worse. In the more ocean style swell it took more severe angle changes in steering to keep the hull in the water which meant more active trimming to keep everything steady. The apparent changes so dramatically going up a wave versus going down it. And there is only so much you can do with the tiller at that point. Plus the crew gets worn out quickly working the main sheet and traveller when they've already been on the clock for 30 something hours. Anyways, my point is that the m32 is very different then a foiling windsurfer and our speed approach to relative wave/swell size is much different. But nothing beats dead flat water and lots of wind for either setup. Why don't you bring your windsurf setup next year? Could be a good run!
  2. R2AK 2016

    I think another part of the slamming problem upwind in Johnstone St is that we were sailing the boat too flat in those conditions. But to really explain the motion take a look a the video of Mad Dog Racing going up Johnstone Strait (~27 sec into video) That looks very similar to what we were experiencing....albeit slower of course... but launching off of one wave and slamming down on the next with both bows. If we could have powered up and flown a hull more consistently in these conditions I believe we could have knifed through a lot more of the rough stuff, but we were having trouble in the gusty conditions keeping the power consistently on. I think with quite a bit more time sailing and tuning we can do a better job of flying in these conditions. But it also seems like there is a component of the rig/sail weight that we are fighting in these conditions. It is a lot of momentum up high trying to complete a roll/ continue the bows pitching forward that must be absorbed.... so lighter aloft would help the motion quite a bit too. I can see where you think a softer gust response rig would be cool! Same thing happens with our 40er ULDB if I'm not steering to the wave valleys, especially above 7 knots hull speed, if the bow has been lifted at speed, but the bow is not involved very often, mainly the hull in the 2nd 5th of the front part of the hull. When the bow falls down on chop, usually it slices any bumps it falls on, which is why I asked mr perry during her design for more v up front, although it lowers the cp some, but that only helps if I can feather up enough so the boat is upright enough so I'm landing on the v rather than the side of the hull. (That, and she's a light air flyer.) Which is more what is happening in the video with the cat on both hulls. Hard design trade off, especially racing, when higher prismatic is a faster thing, Especially from mid hull back, where most of the lift of mad dog on top of chop seems to be happening. Be interesting to hear from the Hobie 16 after the race. So I'm hoping that the relatively narrow v'd hulls of the L7 might take some of the slamming out of a chop. Nice thing about a Gunter, if it breaks I hope the mast doesn't go with it, so iterations don't break the bank- we'll find out! The M32 is definitely more comfortable when one hull is up and flying clear of the waves. However, in the video we're sailing pretty flat and getting pounded. We could have powered up more but the gusts were nasty. Worse than that we would have been sailing much faster (possibly 50% faster) and while we would be on one hull, I think we would have launched airborne off every wave and slammed down even harder. After the helicopter left we took in a second reef. Lowering the CE helped a lot. No loss of speed and much less pitching. Hey, Randy, just wondering how much the weight of all the gear challenged you in both performance and comfort level in sailing (I know weight can get a little sketchy on smaller beach cats with big wind). I'm sure you were well adjusted to it by the end (and it was getting lighter), but just wondering how the M32 is influenced by the kind of weight you had to carry to get you through the race. Also, did you feel like you took about the right amount of stuff, too much, or too little? I can let Randy answer more specifically but we were never over-weight. I believe when we did our final pack-up in Victoria we were near 50lbs shy of our usual one-design weight. The M32 is not designed or built with lots of extra wiggle room in it's engineering limits so we decided not to push it. Otherwise we would have taken 10 sailors and a cook!
  3. R2AK 2016

    I think another part of the slamming problem upwind in Johnstone St is that we were sailing the boat too flat in those conditions. But to really explain the motion take a look a the video of Mad Dog Racing going up Johnstone Strait (~27 sec into video) That looks very similar to what we were experiencing....albeit slower of course... but launching off of one wave and slamming down on the next with both bows. If we could have powered up and flown a hull more consistently in these conditions I believe we could have knifed through a lot more of the rough stuff, but we were having trouble in the gusty conditions keeping the power consistently on. I think with quite a bit more time sailing and tuning we can do a better job of flying in these conditions. But it also seems like there is a component of the rig/sail weight that we are fighting in these conditions. It is a lot of momentum up high trying to complete a roll/ continue the bows pitching forward that must be absorbed.... so lighter aloft would help the motion quite a bit too. In those shots we weren't lacking enough power to fly the hull higher. I was keeping the boat from launching too hard and keeping the rig as steady as possible in all dimensions. As soon as you start flying the hull to high you lose to much righting moment in the gusts and then you are flying the hull relative to the surface of the water(unsteady) and not to planet earth(steady). The consequence is bad VMG as we were going upwind in a narrow gorge with massive amounts of upwind current. Best not to reach from side to side if it can be helped. It's okay for the windward hull to touch the water as long as you keep the right load balance between the foils and sail to maximize your speed forward. And keeping your rig steady side to side really helps with this.
  4. New Nacra 15

    I should elaborate then that the 15 is clearly less powerful then the 17 but that two guys heavier then your average Olympic team were able to get it going surprisingly well in light and lumpy conditions. It will be a great boat for the younger and lighter junior sailors no doubt.
  5. New Nacra 15

    Took it out for a spin after the last day of racing. It was a bit light and choppy and I was sailing with another fella but was surprised how quickly it would still power up. Not all that different from the 17. Just smaller and more simplified. I like the trunk set-up better on the 15 though. My only real concern is the rudder horizontals. The shape is not quite right for lifting and of course they are much too small for the weight of the boat and crew. It provided some definite fore/aft stability at speed but you could also feel the drag in the helm. I would recommend either a whole new set-up and design or just keep the standard rudders. I mean, if everything else stayed the same, I bet you would actually see a performance increase by going back to the standard rudders. Well anyways it looks like I'll head out to Holland soon and do some more development testing with them.
  6. New Nacra 15

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  7. New Nacra 15

    Looks like a cool boat up close. A bit more simplified in some ways then the 17's. The horizontals on the rudders look just big enough to provide more pitch control but I reckon you won't get all that much major lift out of them. The dutch boys where just rigging up for an evening sail while everyone was heading to the opening ceremonies so no comment yet on the performance but it has all the potential to go fast I reckon..
  8. New Nacra 15

    The beef is getting critical mass of boats anywhere but the EU... lets see.... we have the Hobie Dragoon.... then the Nacra SL16... then an F16.... Now something else again...... Oh... and of course... an occasional use of the Hobie 16 with spin... This is just a silly transfer of money from parents to ISAF and builders...and can't possibly grow the sport of cat racing... . It's tough enough to grow the sport through kids programs...changing youth boats AGAIN makes no sense. So making false statements and accusing Nacra of selling "dangerous weapons" to kids is meant to grow youth sailing in multihulls? Can you explain that please? And what's a junior sailor going to prefer, an outdated F16 or semi foiling Nacra15? Do you want to develop youth sailors or hold them back on slower and older boats. Imagine if you were 16 years old and could campaign on a smaller version of what you see your sailing hero's on. Get over yourself because it's not about the money. Bashing the development of youth sailing boats is a sad and slippery slope. In the US, old yacht club farts decided the 29er was too radical and investing into the FJ and club 420 was the right choice for junior sailors across America. Well the rest of the world passed us by and everyone wonders why there was only one American on the final Oracle race team last year.
  9. New Nacra 15

    Looks like a fun boat for the youth. I was surprised to see this posted by the international F16 class though... "Nacra has launched a 15 foot catamaran with gennnaker, curved daggerboards and T-rudders as a bid for the next youth multihull. For experienced catamaran sailors, this boat will be a rocket. For youth sailors emerging from an Optimist, 420 or 29'er this boat poses a dangerous weapon. It took some of the best catamaran sailors around more than a year to handle such a beast. Letting the kids sail it is irresponsible." What's the beef?
  10. AC Youth Cup

    The Force takes part in a top secret boat building competition and comes out victorious! Hope you guys enjoy this fun take on a plywood boat building contest and one Youth AC team's battle against better funded and more experienced teams. (its sort of a cheaper, knockoff version of The Wind Gods)
  11. AC Youth Cup

    I appreciate everyone's support. The team is holding up well and pushing forward as strong as ever. Here's our latest video installment of our team's training on the AC45s to hopefully put things back on a lighter note.
  12. AC Youth Cup

    We appreciate the thought. Our team is holding strong with lots of internal and external support. It is always terrible to be in a position where you lose someone's life just on the other side of a piece of glass. There was nothing any of us could have done better to save the poor lady's life but I think we will always hold it to ourselves as a failure. I will never forget that feeling of losing,
  13. AC Youth Cup

    http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/local/san_francisco&id=9147991
  14. AC Youth Cup

    The door closed on the first phase of the American Youth Sailing Force training program this past weekend with the final two days of AC45 training provided by Oracle Team USA. With OTUSA’s withdrawal of support, the team is on its own for next phase of training. The Force will be relying exclusively on the SL33 and a new physical fitness program to prepare ourselves for the Red Bull Youth America’s Cup. This is new news probably for most people here, but Oracle Team USA has shut down its Youth AC program. Our team (The Force) is now operating independently from now through September 4th. I hope you guys enjoy this tongue and cheek movie production, it's us making the best of a less then ideal situation.
  15. AC Youth Cup

    We'll be showing some cool video's and sharing stories about our adventure so far. Open bar and free donated wine through dinner. Tickets are available at the door and all payments are tax refundable. Tom Ehman will also be there doing a CupDate. Will be an awesome night for sure. Here's just a preview of what we'll be showing. http://americanyouthsailingforce.eventbrite.com/