trisail

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About trisail

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  1. trisail

    Wauquiez Gladiator

    Good evening, I sailed two regattas way back in 1977 and 1978 on a Gladiateur when they were brand new. We also sailed a 460 odd mile offshore race with the boat and all went well until we dropped the rig just short of the finish. At night, hard pressed under kite in a rising wind, building seas and some cross waves followed by a chines gybe. Something had to give and the mast went over the side. But we still finished mid fleet under jury rig. As said in an earlier post the boat was designed by Holman and Pye, who did most of the Wauquiez design work back then. Wauquiez build quality was very good and you could take all their boats on trans-Atlantic passages. I also did a lot of sailing on their Centurion class sloops. The Centurions were also well built offshore boats. Wauquiez built nice boats and Holman and Pye designed good offshore boats so the package was easy on the eye and on the water. Back to the Gladiateur, it was a typical IOR influenced design of the mid-, late 1970's with a pinched stern and when pushed hard under spinnaker on the open ocean the boat would do a fair amount of rolling......like all the others designs did back then. I recall the boat rated about IOR 3/4 ton and sailed fairly well on the local race course but was definitely no rocket ship. Down below the layout was good for sailing offshore, with proper sea berths for the crew on either tack. I would believe that a well looked after boat would be a nice safe offshore boat with no vices. Have fun!
  2. trisail

    Finn Class making friends?

    Thanks, I love the creativity of children. They will find a use for something which is so different from what it was initially intended for. Like using a Finn as a kiddies boat. One guy steers, the other one works the throttle. Did I say, "they grow up too fast". The chappy at the back is now one year short of becoming a medical doctor, the guy in the front is running his own business these days.
  3. trisail

    Show your dingy sailing....

    Sonnet. 4.2 meter scow. Main and jib only. Built in plywood or glass. At present the biggest fleets for class nationals in South Africa.
  4. trisail

    Finn Class making friends?

    At the age of 7, our son told me that he prefers sailing the Finn rather than his Optimist. I would spend hours keeping an eye on him while he mucked about in our old 75 dollar Finn in front of our house.
  5. trisail

    Go simple, go small, go now - put it here

    Morning, The pics you saw was my boat ( F9AX), but with the new owner sailing it. He has kitted the boat out with all the bells and whistles. Taller carbon rotating mast, high tec sails, code zero sails on a furler, every instrument imaginable etc. Also upgraded the foils to carbon and the latest Farrier profiles. The new owner has done the race three times with the boat and is going again in a year's time. He has recently added another meter to the mast! These days the race starts from Cape Town. Our boat has taken line honors 4 in a row now. Not bad for a backyard built boat. Wheras I actually wanted a minimalist boat, the new owner is the exact opposite. Nice guy and a very good multihull sailor. Regards.
  6. trisail

    Go simple, go small, go now - put it here

    Hallo Russell, We sailed the 2010 Governor's Cup Race. Simons Town, South Africa to St Helena island in the mid-Atlantic.
  7. trisail

    Go simple, go small, go now - put it here

    I did just that with a friend. We took my Farrier F9 on a 1800 mile ocean race. When I entered the boat in the race I had three sails namely main, jib and storm jib. We were lent two kites off a chubby little 9 meter monohull. Instruments? A VHF radio, speedo and echo sounder and a little Garmin e trec GPS. Plotting on paper charts. We were lent a sat phone. A Windex at the top of the mast and a torch to check it at night. A friend lent us a life raft. Cooking on a single burner gas stove. Lose bottles of water packed low down for drinking. Sunlounger cushions to sleep on. Two solar panels hot wired straight to the battery for power. We had a choice, go now with what we've got, or never go at all. We chose to go. And we capped it with a first to finish. The F9 or Corsair 31 is a great boat offshore. Regards.
  8. trisail

    Classy women sailing

    Pure class, Lisa McDonald, Amer Sports Too. Emma Richards, Pindar.
  9. trisail

    Where Has Your Boat Taken You?

    Mine took me from a childhood dream to a dream come true. It was a journey. To build my own boat and to sail it accross the ocean.
  10. trisail

    Fastnet 40 years ago

    Sorry, should have uploaded these two.
  11. trisail

    Fastnet 40 years ago

    Good afternoon, The covers of SAIL (Kialoa) and Yachting World ( A rudderless Casse Tete) at the time. Last week I attended the funeral of an old friend of mine who was the skipper of the 5th placed yacht in Class 4 in the race(and the last Class 4 boat to finish). By the way, Class 5 only had one finisher, a Contessa 32, called Ascent. My friend and some mates had made up a crew and travelled all the way from South Africa to charter a Nicholson 345 to sail Cowes Week and the 79 Fastnet. So when the storm came they simply dropped sail and lay ahull till it blew over and then carried on with the race. They reasoned that having traveled so far to take part in the race, pulling out was not an option. Being from South Africa they were used to rough weather and big seas. I recall back then he told me that altough it was a terrible storm, he and the first mate had seen worse before off the South African coast. Regards.
  12. trisail

    Farrier 18ft trimaran

    Hallo, Google, " trailertri 18 prototype " for a bit of history and info from Ian Farrier.
  13. trisail

    Farrier 18ft trimaran

    Good evening, Do a bit of Google searching, there used to be (or still is) an owners forum for Ian Farrier's plywood trailer tris. I used to follow it many years ago. There were loads of info and tips about the early plywood Farrier tris on there and quite a bit of advice from Ian Farrier himself as well. I got the impression that the old boats were becoming sought after for restoration projects in Australia. Someone had even found the very first Farrier 18 footer and had rebuilt it. Ian did a write up on it as well. If you are handy and brave with a disc sander, any plywood/ epoxy boat is fixable. What skills you don't have, you soon acquire. Epoxy is wonderful stuff and can fix most mistakes. You just end up sanding a bit more than the good guys do. In any case, boat fixing is 95 % sanding and grinding and only 5% is boat fixing. Farrier boats are loads of fun. I built my own F9 ax many years ago. Best boat I ever had. Regards.
  14. Being first to finish in a 1800 mile ocean race on a boat that I had built myself, off plan, in our garage at home.