MrSwordfish

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About MrSwordfish

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  • Location
    Michigan, USA
  • Interests
    Rope collecting

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  1. MrSwordfish

    Physics of roll tacking

    Why do they all have what looks like a giant block of cheese strapped to the bow?
  2. MrSwordfish

    Physics of roll tacking

    You are allowed to heel the boat to facilitate steering, so at the start you can heel the boat to steer up to a close hauled course. Perfectly legal. But you only get to do it once.
  3. MrSwordfish

    Physics of roll tacking

    Two basic things are at work here: 1) Most boats have a hull design that makes them turn to weather when heeled. So, if you heel the boat to leeward, it will head up without using the rudder, or with less rudder. Since the rudder is basically a brake, steering with the hull instead of he rudder is faster. Then, once the boat has passed head to wind and is on the new close hauled course, heeling it the other way will stop the turn, again without using the rudder. This is why roll tacking is legal - you're allowed to use heel to facilitate steering. 2) The essence of the roll tack, what makes it fast, is the burst of speed you get when you bring the boat back to flat at the end. By "fanning" the sail across the air, you push a lot of air backwards. Air goes backwards, the boat squirts forward. You can use this idea at the start - when the gun goes off (or slightly before) roll the boat to leeward and then hike it back to flat. Basically, half a roll tack.
  4. MrSwordfish

    Charter a Melges 15...why the hell not?

    I was hoping for a Portsmouth number. Actually, a serious question. Assuming they're still allowed here.
  5. MrSwordfish

    Charter a Melges 15...why the hell not?

    Ok, so nobody has asked this yet: What's it rate?
  6. MrSwordfish

    Charter a Melges 15...why the hell not?

    Very curious about this boat as a possibility to replace our club fleet of JY-15s. On paper, it looks like a winner, but I haven't sailed one yet so I'm very interested in finding out more. Seems to be a reasonably fast planing double-handed dinghy without being so advanced you need to be an acrobat to keep it upright. Lots of beginners at our club, so we need something that's fairly beginner friendly and also durable. We're thinking about Wayfarers, but I'd prefer to see something with a bit more responsiveness. Not sure if this is the one. If you've got comments, I'm all ears. Thanks.
  7. MrSwordfish

    they both suck?

    Looks like 1258 and 1334 gybed on to port at the mark and 1612 didn't. Toss 1258 and 1334 under rule 10 unless you can find a reason to exhonerate 1258 under rule 16.
  8. MrSwordfish

    they both suck?

    Yep, it's no longer prohibited to sail below your proper course under rule 17. I'm guessing that the OP meant *above* a proper course. But we'd need to know how the overlap was established and where the boats were trying to go before trying to apply rule 17. Looks to me that a gust his and both boats went ass over tea kettle.
  9. MrSwordfish

    Is this an I14?

    A pivoting centreboard allows you to adjust the center of lateral resistance fore and aft making for better control. It will also kick up if you hit something under the water. The advantage of a daggerboard vs a swing-up centreboard is that it's cheaper to build - you just need a slot rather than a centreboard trunk. Laser, sunfish, V15, butterfly, topper etc. have daggerboards because they were designed a s cheap boats.
  10. MrSwordfish

    Is this an I14?

    I've used 420 sails (which are also 110 sq ft) on my Albacore when I want to take it easy when it's blowing. Should work fine for this boat too, and given the ubiquity of college 420s used sails are easy to come by.
  11. MrSwordfish

    Is this an I14?

    The Albacore and the Jet 14 are both living examples of Uffa Fox's I-14 design from the 30s. For the Albacore, the hull plan was enlarged by a foot to 15 LOA. This hull looks to be the exact same shape as either, so likely an old I-14. Many changes to the class since this boat was made. So, no reason why this wouldn't make a nice day sailor if you put appropriately sized sails on it. It will be more lively than, say, a Flying Scott, but should be manageable. But it is a planing hull, so expect an adrenaline rush if the wind gets above twelve or so.