Indio

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Everything posted by Indio

  1. Evidently, a frankensteined version of what Artemis had.
  2. Indio

    Team NYYC

    Hahaha Good on Magnus - he won;'t get any Xmas card from Team Brexitannia but will probably get some AM gear for Xmas from Hutch. Dream Match for the Cup: AM Vs ETNZ.
  3. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    https://rule69blog.wordpress.com/ Foil and Trouble The witches in Macbeth had it about right: “Double, double, toil and trouble; Fire burn and caldron bubble.” For the British team in this Cup cycle it’s: ‘double, double foil trouble’ and they were once again at the mercy of a ruthless King in the form of Team New Zealand today. Shakespeare’s play is all about rampant ambition for the crown and ends with Macbeth being beheaded on the field of battle by a ruthless warrior in the form of Macduff. Ambition is a killer. The casting is obvious. Ainslie as Macbeth, Dalton as Macduff. The inevitable is real. Copyright: Emirates Team New Zealand The America’s Cup has many shipwrecks on its shore. The vast majority of them, so the history books show, are British. It almost feels like an impossible dream. I wonder whether, in my lifetime, I will ever see the English football team lift the World Cup. I doubt it. I have the same feeling about the America’s Cup. It is such a monumental mountain to climb, so difficult to win, and you are drawn to it like the great mountaineers “because it’s there.” Challengers come and challengers go. The Brits normally put up a decent fight but have always failed. This time the belief was, and probably still is in some mad corners of the internet, there but unless you believe in miracles and witchcraft, the result is inevitable. The arc of history will not be bent in this cycle. Today’s one-day Prada Christmas Race was farcical from the get-go. The wind didn’t play ball and exposed the new AC class as the donkeys they are in displacement. Ugly carbon monoliths, wallowing and pitching are a sad sight and not what the event wishes to portray. For traditionalists like me that have harped on about bringing back displacement boats in the Cup, our theories are consigned to the dustbin. The Cup is on the right path, they just need to bring in a higher wind range at the lower end and can the racing if it looks like dropping below. Copyright: Emirates Team New Zealand But whilst the racing lasted it was agony and embarrassment for the British sailors. Towed up onto their foils to get into the pre-start with Team New Zealand, one gybe and then a drag race to the start line which they missed down in coffin’s corner, the team were smoked by under-fire Pete Burling. The mountain is very steep to climb anywhere near the favourites. Tacking onto port saw Ineos splashdown and that was that. They never got foiling again. The Kiwis sailed off to the horizon, rounded the top mark, flew down the run and then came back to lap a desperate outfit wondering how much more of this they can take. Credit to Ben and Giles Scott, they kept their humour but it’s gallows humour. They know just how embarrassing this Cup is for them and what it’s doing for future employment opportunities in the game. The only thing they can do is keep it professional and maintain the belief that brighter days are ahead. We are 100% going to see a different Ineos when they come back on January 15th. Everything will be thrown at this now including the kitchen sink. Everybody is watching. It is the story of the Cup so far – although I would argue that the real story that is about to be played is the New York Yacht Club’s challenge. Ineos is a side-show. A macabre entertainment of sorts that the Cup so acutely and brutally throws up in nearly every cycle. The fact that the race was ultimately abandoned as Team New Zealand missed the time limit by a few seconds is irrelevant. The pecking order has been firmly established. The Michaelmas Term is over and the report cards are in. Team New Zealand is the teacher’s pet, top of the class. American Magic is a pleasure to teach and just needs to work on its exam technique. Prada is a bit disruptive in class, shows flashes of excellence but could do with concentrating more. For Ineos, the headmaster is questioning the parents as to whether this is the right school for their child. The Lent Term begins on January 15th and we’ll see who hired the best tutors over the Christmas holidays. As the witches say, the fire is burning and the caldron is bubbling. Can’t wait. The America’s Cup is game-on.
  4. Indio

    Team NYYC

    Terry’s Time Throughout the 1990’s I sailed J24s and in the latter part of that decade, the team that I sailed with got pretty good. I was one fifth of a team called Fuzzy Duck – legends in the bar, weapons-grade at the end of year class-association gathering, wrecking balls at Cowes Week and somehow, pretty slick on the water. We got to a level to challenge nationally, flirted with Europe but always knew that there was another level. © Sailing Energy / American Magic In Wales (of all places) in 1994, Ken Read came over to the UK already a four-time world champion (he went on to record six) and won his fifth title and the story of how his crew could steer the boat downwind through crew movement alone entered the lexicon of sailing myths. The American dominance of the fleet in that era was incredible. King Kenny moved on to bigger and better things only to be replaced by Bill Fortenberry, Chris Larson, Vince Brun and in 1998, Terry Hutchinson all etching their names on the trophy. The Americans were very very tough to beat. © Sailing Energy / American Magic That ’98 win in J24’s was almost inevitable. Terry Hutchinson was a huge name on the scene in Corel 45’s and Mumm 36’s having already bagged a Congressional Cup in ’92. But it was just the start as he went offshore with success in the IMS division, won three world championships in the Farr 40 class and then found his forte in the TP52 class where the Quantum Racing Team were pretty well unbeatable. Terry’s Cup career has been interesting. The America One challenge in 2000 that came so close and was put to the sword ultimately by failure of luminous sailcloth (I kid you not), saw Terry on mainsheet. Dennis Conner’s last hurrah Stars & Stripes campaign came in 2003, say no more. Terry then had a decent run with Team New Zealand in 2007 that saw the Kiwis through to the final but ultimately aced by Alinghi despite two race wins in the Match. A brief flirtation with the Swedes of Artemis in 2011 and then a near-ten year break from the competition before arriving as skipper and Executive Director of American Magic. The Cup is a long game littered with disappointments, heartbreak and heartache. It’s difficult to win. So many elements have to come together: Funding, building, design, testing, team, support crew. If one element fails, you simply will not win. Ultimately success trickles up from the security guards at the base to the chefs, to the comms team, through marketing and up through the designers, boatbuilders, sailors, mechatronics team (!) right to the management and team principals. © Sailing Energy / American Magic Hutchinson knows this game borne from long experience and what has been assembled at American Magic is exemplary. They have got so much right in this cycle. In Hap Fauth, Doug DeVos and Roger Penske they have Team Principals with quiet ambition, long experience and a firm hand on the tiller. In Phil Lotz they have the experience and respect to be expected of the position of Commodore of the most prestigious yacht club in the world. And in the New York Yacht Club they have the full, undying support of a membership that has been this way before. Meanwhile, Marcelo Botin’s design team are close to the best on the planet. On the water, Hutchinson has assembled a no-nonsense team buried in the analysis and with their feet on the ground. Results are flowing. The performance is undeniable. Off the water, Terry is protecting his sailors on the podium, keeping the message on track and it’s the blueprint for how a challenger should conduct themselves. No controversy, get on with the job. Quietly let others take the limelight. Say the right things. Be courteous. Humble and then hit hard. This is Terry’s time and the Challengers have got it all-on to try and catch them. It will be close with Prada but the world is waking up to the magic in American Magic.
  5. Indio

    Team NYYC

    New York New York Back in the early 1990’s I was sent by my company for a two year stint on Wall Street. I had just turned 20 and it was the opportunity of a lifetime. I was put up in Battery Park downtown in the most beautiful apartment and woke every day looking out to the Statue of Liberty. My balcony at the back gave a stunning view of the Twin Towers of the World Trade Centre, where a decade later I would sadly lose so many dear friends and colleagues. Work was really tough. I had a posh British accent and was wet behind the ears but the FX markets in those days were like the Wild West. Imagine the movie, The Wolf of Wall Street, it was madder than that. Insanely so. I loved it. © Sailing Energy / American Magic Down in Battery Park there’s a marina and back in my day they had J24’s that they raced on weekdays, Wednesdays from recollection. I was in a bar called The Pipeline overlooking the harbour one evening, got talking to a skipper and ended up doing bow for the next two years – summer, winter, rain or shine. It was a laugh. The beers after were better than our sailing if I’m truly honest but I was in the scene. Sailing does that. The guy I sailed with, I won’t mention his name, was connected to the New York Yacht Club. I think his father was a member and one summer me and the crew got invited to Newport to do some sailing. We hung out at the unbelievable summer house of the Club where I was too terrified to talk to anyone. The patrons were lovely though. Welcoming. They couldn’t do enough for us. Nothing was too much trouble. It was a magical, privileged time for me and the New York Yacht Club made it. Years later I raced for them in a regatta called the Viyella Cup and again, they were courteous, polite and bloody good sailors. I never got to go to the clubhouse in West 44th Street in Manhattan and it’s a lifelong ambition to do so. My club in Cowes has a reciprocal arrangement so one day I hope to walk those venerable, hallowed corridors and have a drink or two at the bar after marvelling at the model room. Bring on the vaccine. On the evidence of today in Auckland though, entry to the Club could be about to become a lot harder. Security might be a whole heap tighter. Letters of introduction will need vetting and scrutiny. American Magic is in this regatta big time and are quickly becoming the favourites to challenge Team New Zealand in March. © Sailing Energy / American Magic If it wasn’t for a foil issue, they had the beating of the Kiwis today. They look fast. They look highly motivated and they have an axis of genius in Terry Hutchinson, Paul Goodison and Dean Barker. Why Goodie is on the American boat and not Ineos tells you all you need to know about the British campaign. And it’s all to the benefit of the New York Yacht Club. A life membership awaits Goodie if they pull this off and I’ll be honest, I’m awestruck by the Kiwis but I’m cheering louder and louder for the Americans. But I suspect it’s not just me. And I have an evidence of sort to prove it… Last night I went onto the UK Helly Hansen website – they are the makers of the American Magic gear – to see if I could buy some kit. I am such a sad fanboy of the Cup. And it’s pretty much sold out across the board. I couldn’t believe it. Am I on to something here? Has the UK jettisoned Ineos so quickly and switched sides to our greatest ally on the world stage? It certainly feels like it. Turncoats the lot of us. Shameful! But for the record American Magic – I am size medium.
  6. Indio

    Christmas Regatta

    Not to us - to Brexitannia, yes.
  7. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Metres?
  8. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    If there really is any genuine interest in a collaborative effort to "fix the "FCS problem" (notwithstanding the obvious that the FCS is not the "problem"!!) as advocated by 2 of the teams, then here is the true test of their collaborative will: Why don't they all agree to increase the number of foils allowed from 6 to 8, and/or allow unlimited mods? Of course they won't, because of self-interest. Instead, they try to "guilt" ETNZ into sharing their proprietary control system by inventing a "problem" with the simplest and most basic control system on any of the AC75s
  9. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Care to comment??
  10. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Thank you - learning something new every day. Great to have you back..
  11. You're all getting sucked in by Sir Ben's blame game: it is NOT the FCS that's at fault, but their own developed ECC which is the heart of their control system. All on-boat signalling and switching of the FCS, HCC, electrical actuators, etc. are managed and controlled by the ECC. What we should learn from the "problems" the 3 Challengers are having is they have not learned much about ETNZ's control system from AC35 - which shoots down the claim by NH "experts" that ETNZ's AC50 controls were an LR development! When they claim they need the software so they can "diagnose their problems", what they mean is they want to see how ETNZ's ECC Control System works - and ETNZ are quite rightly telling them to take a hike!! The FCS is easily the simplest switching system aboard the AC75s: 1: apply power to solenoid a on the directional control hydraulic valve, the rams extend and lower the arm. Stop the power supply to the solenoid, the valve spool returns to neutral and rams stop; 2: apply power to solenoid b, the rams retract and raise the arm: stop the power supply, ram stops. Where I believe they've got problems is the integration of the simple FCS controls into their ECC and automating the process with other interdependent switching operations from the hundreds of sensors aboard. Eg. I think they're using electrically-switched rachet-type locking mechanisms to physically hold the arms in place rather than relying on hydraulic lock - the seals in the rams will leak, letting the arm drop mm by mm. They would need to link switching the rachet lock to switching the relevant solenoid - if the timing is out, shit happens. The fact that a PCB failed and a replacement one cooked points to an electrical problem elsewhere - confirmed by the batteries shutting down. I can help them with their problems, but why should I help the opposition?
  12. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Iain Percy would have been my pick to run the Ineos AC Challenge, with Sir Ben concentrating on co-ordinating the design and sailing team.
  13. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Magnus has always slammed non-sailing backroom cronies of Ratty's who've moved in and taken control.
  14. Indio

    Luna Rossa Challenge. AC 36

    He was referring to the raised arm in the particular video he referenced. If it's the lowered arm, it would be deliberate manipulation - listen carefully and you will hear the hydraulic pump hard at work.
  15. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Black Magic Kiwis seem to have a habit of building either truly great teams or ones, that for dynastic reasons, don’t quite hit the mark. At every Rugby World Cup they are ‘the’ story. How good is this team? Will they win? And invariably the answer hinges around whether the team is newly formed with a smattering of rookies or an absolute unit with players approaching their peak. If the latter, you may as well etch their name on the William Webb Ellis Trophy. If the former it’s a struggle. And it’s no different in the America’s Cup. Sir Peter Blake put the Black Magic team together with a generation of sailors approaching their peak fused with unbelievable talent and experience from the bow to the stern. Ernesto Bertarelli plundered Blakey’s best right at their peak with vast, ugly euro riches and aced a Kiwi ‘B’ Team at the start of their personal Cup careers. Since Grant Dalton took over, very much in the style of Blake who was as competitive and no-nonsense as hell, it has been a rollercoaster ride to perfection. Getting over the Coutts/Butterworth era was hard but pivoting to the utter brilliance of the Burling/Tuke/Ashby axis has been a masterstroke. Today they enter the Cup with the full package. Sailors at the top of their game. Designers going beyond the limit on detail. A shore team that is honoured to work for the flag. And a leader that takes no prisoners. Emirates Team New Zealand racing INEOS TEAM UK during Race 5 / Day 2 of the ACWS Auckland. Te Rehutai and Britannia in front of North Head and Devonport. They are at the top of the game. Team New Zealand is looking unbeatable. The Magic losses in recent days are like training ground run-outs. Everyone knows they mean next to zero other than a byline in a paper, a footnote when the history of this Cup cycle is written. This is the Kiwi dynasty fully imagined. This America’s Cup team is akin to the ‘Untouchables’ All Blacks Team of 2013 and is close to the ‘Incomparables’ of 1996. It’s the Black Magic of ’95, the Alinghi of ’03, the Stars & Stripes of ’87, the Australia II of ’83. They are writing history and it’s bloody impressive to watch. Controlled aggression masked as competition was much in evidence yesterday. Off the back of an embarrassing Press Conference performance from Ben Ainslie, the team came out slugging. Ben took them on. The Kiwis are up for the fight. Boys v Men. On the rostrum Pete Burling was concessionary and sympathetic to his mate Ben’s plight but by the time he got back to the base, the mood had changed, the message was very different. An official press release was issued by the team regarding the foil cant system and if you translate it from Kiwi to English it basically says: “Take a hike, you aren’t ruining our parade.” Classic Dalton. Get on the front foot. Get ahead of the story. Squash it. Don’t allow the bloggers or the media the oxygen to blow up the balloon. Brilliant. Masterful. 15/12/20 – Auckland (NZL) 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada Opening ceremony And then came the racing. Two races against Ineos Team UK. Sir Edmund Hilary climbed Everest, Ben Ainslie is facing Everest with K2 on top. The Kiwis smoked them and exposed Ratty’s Rita as a different generation boat. Giving Ben a 400 metre lead in the second race after a splashdown pre-start would, in usual circumstances, be game over. I’ve seen Ben win Olympic races by over a leg in the Finn. But in this game, the Kiwis just kept calm, fired up the afterburners and ground Ineos into a pulp. Sure, they are not the finished article just yet but they are building an impossible momentum that is just so impressive to watch. The talk in the air is about their mainsail camber control systems. I would suggest that’s a red herring, it’s the whole package that’s doing this from the lowliest team member doing work experience to the chef at the base through to the sailing team and upwards to Darth Dalton. Impressive. Mighty impressive. Black Magic.
  16. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    The one from yesterday Tough Call Waiting in the queue outside a nightclub is, from memory, a miserable experience. I am far too old for nightclubs now. But that horrible anticipation standing on a rainy street with a shaven-headed thug stopping your progression is amplified by the thought that your mates are dancing inside and you’re just not at the party. Team Ineos must be looking over at the racing going on between Prada and Magic with the eyes of a teenager in the queue. 15/12/20 – Auckland (NZL) 36th America’s Cup presented by Prada Practice Races – Day 3 New York Yacht Club American Magic The action is all over there and the racecraft that is being polished is vital to the outcome of the Challenger series starting in a few short weeks’ time. Trailing around a racecourse or getting blown away on boatspeed is a really tough, grinding, soul destroying experience. We have all been there. Do you learn much? No, you get deflated if you’re honest with yourself but for Ineos we are in the: “at-least-they-got-round-today” school of thought and that’s a poor return for the expectation that the team, not the media, have been building up for the past three years. Public Relations around this effort has been nigh on catastrophic despite the sailors best efforts to dial down a public expectation fuelled by typical British optimism and dis-connected corporate nonsense. But the Magic/Prada match up is the story that will run and run in the next month or so. They are probably too close to call. Terry Hutchinson’s team were the first to splash and get on with sailing this new yachting concept and their early start to the campaign is paying rich dividends. Jimmy Spithill fused with the affable Francesco Bruni meanwhile is my guess for why Prada is doing so well. Both boats have weaknesses in design and performance that will be tweaked and addressed in the coming days and weeks but don’t be fooled by the modifications story. No-one is going to leap ahead, development classes don’t often throw up huge, game-changing breakthroughs. They are all throwing money in the same direction and will all develop at a commensurate pace. I fully expect Magic and Prada to still be nip and tuck come January 15th. Who will win? It’s a very close call as evidenced on the water today but I am so impressed with how Terry Hutchinson is approaching this regatta and how he’s kept the expectation levels in check both at home in the States and down in Auckland that I am leaning towards ‘Bruce the Shark’ to come out on top when it’s all said and done. Punchy call but I suspect that Prada will fall off at the death. New York Yacht Club vs The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron for the America’s Cup in March. It’s got a ring to it. You heard it here first. Don’t put your house on it but that’s my call on the evidence so far.
  17. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Here you are Embarrassing Picking on the weak and vulnerable is not a place to be. I was told from the inside, just before the practice race started that the British boat had a tail, ears and a wet nose. If you listened closely you could hear it bark. It wasn’t, however, obedient and didn’t really like ‘walkies’ out on the Hauraki Gulf. It was highly prone to roll-over and when it sat, it rarely got back up again. I had to make a judgement call. Go with the story in my usual manner or park it in the knowledge that it just can’t be so. It really won’t be that bad. Too much money has gone into this. Too much time has been spent on the water. Too many good people were involved. © Sailing Energy / American Magic But I looked at footage. I spoke to some more people. I dug, like a dog, a little deeper for a bone. Sure, I had heard from the very outset that the team were lions led by donkeys, and I include all the sailors in the lions category, but did effective management really make that much of a difference? And surely the brilliant and cohesive force of Ben would negate any back-room concerns. On this I was wrong. The sailors were/are being sent on a kamikazi mission by a non-existent management more keen to throw good people under the bus and protect their long-term positions than to solve the issues. Finger pointing and aggression are not the hallmarks of good, professional management. It’s pathetic. I ran the story and as usual, there was shock. I was savaging the team. I was offering brutal analysis. Media outlets from all over the world called for comment. The team were hitting back and saying I was full of inaccuracies. Everything was on track. Developments were coming onstream. Rabbits were moments from being pulled out of hats. Pigs might fly. I was wrong and a turncoat for suggesting anything other than pure success for the Brits. Oh how I wish that were the case. Let’s be frank, today’s racing was a sheer, utter, unadulterated embarrassment for Team Ineos. It was the saddest sight I have ever seen in sport. In the Cup, it’s almost unprecedented. When the Kiwis lost their rig in the 2003 Match, I remember sitting in the Media Centre surrounded by Kiwi journalists and a huge sense of collective national sadness and shock befell the place. I’d never seen that before. Just how much it meant. Last night, watching live on YouTube from 2am to 5.30am, I felt that sadness. I experienced that shock. I sat in utter disbelief as the Brits capitulated. I could not believe my eyes. This isn’t a nice feeling and actually detracts from the outstandingly brilliant sport being played out in the other races. I watched them but had a lump in my throat. This is like watching a crash in Formula 1 when the racing is stopped and the helicopter is called trackside. You feel for those nearest and dearest. You feel for the families involved. The children cheering on their hero Daddies. The parents back at home sheltering from a Covid nightmare hoping for brief sporting respite in the sun of Auckland. The supporters up all night who have had a resolute blinker on reports like mine of recent days. The mates who know nothing about sailing but have pride in what you are doing. It’s horrible for all involved. Ben was a beaten man at the press conference. The other skippers were uncomfortable in his presence. He admitted that they have ‘serious problems’ and when pushed by the peerless Ed Gorman from the Times in London – incidentally the only British print media journalist worth his salt, qualified and good enough to ask proper questions – it was evident that the game was effectively over. Ben echoed what I’ve been saying about the rash, blind belief in upgrades and modifications at this late stage of the cycle. The best that they can hope for is to get the boat on the water and keep the deltas somewhere respectable. Perhaps even sneak a win or two – you never know? Being beaten by TWO legs today in the Prada match-up and then slaughtered by American Magic is plain and simple embarrassing. So what do they do now. King Kenny had it about right on the commentary. Close the base doors. Turn off the media. Don’t read anything written – especially by me. Don’t talk to anyone. Get your heads down and work like fury. As Ben said, it’s an absolute privilege to even be at the Cup and now is the time for collective effort. Personally, I think it’s time for change and I said as much in a recent post. If I were the Ineos sporting director with the boss coming to town and my job massively on the line, I would be sitting down with the sailors and listening to what needs to change. I would be making swift, decisive, culling actions. Remember how brutal Larry Ellison and Russell Coutts were at 8-1 down? We are in that phase. No sacred cows. Get rid of the rotten core at the heart of this campaign and let me be absolutely clear, that rotten core is not out sailing. It’s all in the backroom and it has to change. The story of this Cup will be how they respond. The next few days are critical. Heads must roll and a new impetus found. End of story.
  18. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    Or they plan to use the shed as a display platform for the Grenadier
  19. Indio

    Luna Rossa Challenge. AC 36

    Just flexing - not allowed to do anything funky with the arm in raised position.
  20. Indio

    INEOS Team GB

    I'm reliably informed by an insider that Ineos have committed to two campaigns in Auckland, on the proviso that ETNZ defends (obviously!!)
  21. Indio

    Christmas Regatta

    Looks like Course C today..
  22. Indio

    Christmas Regatta

    I agree, they can change them by unanimous agreement - but do you honestly believe that LR and Brexitannia will agree to changing the penalties to old-school 360s?
  23. Indio

    Christmas Regatta

    You can dine out on that til March 2021
  24. Indio

    Christmas Regatta

    All he has left is self-deprecating humour...