SimonN

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About SimonN

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    Super Anarchist
  • Birthday 06/05/1959

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    Sydney ex London

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  1. SimonN

    To Foil or not to Foil, that is the question

    Strewth, mate. You got me, fair dinkum! (Keep safe and stay up in Qld!)
  2. SimonN

    To Foil or not to Foil, that is the question

    Sorry to disagree, Sam, but I have owned 4 Exploders, all of which have been left on cradles of one sort or another all their lives and I haven't seen any blistering. All the boats in our training group live on cradles, and again, I haven't seen any blistering. I guess it depends on manufacturer and paint type, but we haven't had any issues with either Exploder or DNA. Maybe it's just that we live in the "Lucky Country"
  3. SimonN

    To Foil or not to Foil, that is the question

    Sorry, I din't see this. Yes, storing on the trailer with the mast up isn't an issue and if the trailer is OK to trail, it is ok to store the boat that way, whether it is a beam support or hull support type. In Australia, most trailers support the front beam but have cradles at the rear.
  4. SimonN

    14' Stunt S9 Foiling Cat

    Michele It's funny how you were the one who started the discussions on A's on this thread and now you are telling me I shouldn't be talking about A's on this thread. If you don't want people posting about A's on a thread about the S9, then don't post about A's and ask questions. And you have been totally wrong about the A's, so why should I do anything than point that out? The numbers do speak for themselves. You said the class would die because of foiling. It hasn't. You said people didn't want to foil A's. They clearly do, It didn't matter what happened going forward, the number of existing non foiling A's would always mean there was a future for the "classics" but the builders are still selling 10 foilers for every new classic. The foiling A has outsold all the other foiling cats by a huge margin - take the UFO out of the picture and it is a fact that the foiling A has sold more than all the others put together. Demand is still high, even with Covid. It is pretty clear to anybody that your predictions about the A Class have been spectacularly wrong and remain so. But as you say, this thread is about the S9 and you have done a great job of bringing a fine foiler to the market. I have never said anything different.
  5. SimonN

    14' Stunt S9 Foiling Cat

    I am not sure what you are getting at. You posted some numbers, which by your own admission, were incomplete. Some of us have posted other numbers to supplement yours. What we know is that in some countries, foiling is more popular than classics, in some it is the other way around. It should come as no shock that currently there are more classics in existence than foilers, seeing classics have been around for 50-60 years and foilers have been around for about 5-6. What we do know is considering the state of small boat sailing worldwide, the A's are doing pretty well. We have found a way of classics and foilers living together, providing more choice for sailors and producing great events. The rules are working and the class is working. Interest is high. At the last 2 worlds, both fleets had good turnouts, with foilers having the larger fleet, but that doesn't matter. They were both great events and were a great coming together of the A Class community, whatever type of boat was sailed. It is also great to see Michele back involved with the class. It shows its strength, because I suspect that he would not be doing it if he didn't see potential demand. And I hope his boat is competitive, because the more builders we have offering competitive products, the better it is for the class.
  6. SimonN

    14' Stunt S9 Foiling Cat

    First, an apology for what might seem like hijacking a thread, although Michele started talking A'! I thought it was important as this is a global forum where the class can be viewed by many to ensure the situation is fully explained. Sam and Rawhide are both right, and wrong! In short, there is concern that the wording of the rule is problematic and this is being considered by the International Association. There are a couple of issues. First, is "rudder rake adjustment" an act or a system? Then there is the issue of the integrity of the people sailing. If everybody had the integrity of Rawhide, there would be no issue, but I am sorry, I do not trust the whole sailing world to not use a system just because they aren't meant to while racing. Again, the issue is proving or disproving any "cheating". If one person clearly sees it happening, it is one person vs another and you cannot disqualify on that (can you trust the person reporting the "infringement"?) So do you need multiple witnesses and/or video evidence? It's a mess. WetnWild is probably on the right track - there is likely to be a requirement to prove the system cannot be adjusted during racing, but as mentioned, this is being discussed. One problem is that WS is in lock down because of Covid and the class cannot get answers out of them. I have asked for a resolution ahead of our nationals so I know what I need to police, but until then, if there are events, we will be taking people on trust.
  7. SimonN

    14' Stunt S9 Foiling Cat

    I don't know the real numbers here in Australia as I don't think we record the split, but I would say it is close to 50/50. One trend we are beginning to see is people having "convertible" boats so they can decide whether to go out as a foiler or classic. For some that is hard to be truly "classic legal" because most foilers now have adjustable rudders, but I think it is a great concept. It's also pretty amazing how fast classics are now going downwind and with much more safety than they used to have.
  8. SimonN

    INEOS Team GB

    All from the same area, say within 10 km of each other, if not the same club. That part of the Mornington Peninsular has McCrae, Safety Beach and Blairgowrie (where Miss Nylex was from) and between them they have produced their fair share of speed record holders and C Class champions. Mix of the right conditions and "the right stuff", I guess, plus the cross fertilisation of ideas.
  9. SimonN

    14' Stunt S9 Foiling Cat

    Look forward to seeing it race against competitive classic A's. Good luck with your development.
  10. SimonN

    INEOS Team GB

    No, he said fastest sailors, not fast in the right conditions........ try speed record holder for 11 years, and then add the current speed record holder.
  11. SimonN

    To Foil or not to Foil, that is the question

    This is part of it, but I believe there is more. When going upwind, the lift from the daggerboards has to do 2 things - counter leeway and lift the boat out of the water. The amount of total lift is limited by the size of the foils and no moving parts. If you overload the foil with leeway, there isn't as much lift available to take off. It's a vicious circle.Downwind, with no leeway to counter, you have a lot more lift for takeoff so you foil at slower take off speeds and it is far easier to keep foiling. Then there is another issue, which i cannot explain. If and when you take off going upwind, it is then fairly easy to achieve about 18 knots and maybe make a bit better vmg than not foiling although most sail so low they lose out, but to get to the high speeds of 22 knots+, where you are sailing maybe 5 degrees higher than a non foiler as well, now that is a whole new level. I can now do it, having been coached by the 2 best upwind foilers in the world, but I am not even sure i can explain what you do. It is a real matter of feel, knowing when you can head up a little more, knowing when to pull on the sheet and so on. Most people know that the aim/need is to be sheeted on as hard as it is possible to pull when you are going flat out, but it's more a case of that is what is needed rather than that is how you get there. Also, once up and running, there is still a lit of steering to be done. None of it is really intuitive.
  12. Probably a little bit of an exaggeration, but do I sense some are more upset by using an "illegal" logo than using a cheap copy "training" sail?
  13. SimonN

    To Foil or not to Foil, that is the question

    I hope you didn't think I was in any way saying you posted something not relevant. Your comments were reasonable, and once the OP had responded, you left it at that. My issue is with ita 16 who constantly attacks everything A Class and shamelessly promotes his own (very good) boat at the expense of all others. Funny thing is, I suspect even if you could, you wouldn't, or at least not for long. I know people who have owned both and they have tended to sail one over the other to the point that one just gathers dust. You tend to be in one camp or the other.
  14. SimonN

    To Foil or not to Foil, that is the question

    If you bothered reading properly, you would have noted that the original poster asked about A's. The first person to respond mentioned other classes to which the OP stated he was really only looking at A's. Surely it would be very strange or even rude, having already offered alternatives to the A and been told that he isn't interested, to continue talking about other foiling cats. Yet again, your obsessive dislike of the A's leads you to post something inappropriate on a thread about the A Class. Maybe you would have better spent your time trying to understand why the A's have grown in popularity over the last few years in most places, probably because of features as a choice between classic and foiling or maybe even a boat that can be either depending how you feel or on the conditions. A's are now developed to the point that foiling is now so much easier than it used to be and is within the grasp of most sailors. The other factor is that the A's can still attract good fleets for racing, something the new foiling cat classes haven't yet achieved. That doesn't mean there isn't room in the market for those classes, but maybe people, other than you, realise that once discussed on a thread and dismissed by the person asking the questions, it would be wrong and rude to continue talking about those classes unless it is to correct information posted by others.
  15. SimonN

    To Foil or not to Foil, that is the question

    I agree with Steve that the pre foiling boats were/are very sweet, but disagree with him on the tipping over front. That's Nathan Outteridge sailing a pre-foiling A in 15-18 knots and I can show you lots of other photos of lesser sailors doing very similar things. I think at that particular championships Nathan had 3 swims, Tom Slingsby 1, Stevie Brewin 1, Darren Bundock 1 and Jimmy Spithill 2. If you push hard, the A can bite. Things are easier today on non foiling boats because they have winglets on the rudders, which help stop the above from happening. For those who aren't quite so suicidal, when the bow begins to go down, sail lower and put both hulls in the water. You still go pretty fast but with twice as much buoyancy, it's a lot safer.