SimonN

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Everything posted by SimonN

  1. SimonN

    A-Class foiling sailors

    But if you look at the position of all the forces when a Moth is sailing, they are very similar to a Cat. Upwind, the Moth is heeled to windward by a considerable amount. Lateral resistance is produced by the (no longer) horizontal foil, which is well to leeward of the CoE of the rig
  2. SimonN

    A-Class foiling sailors

    I think that there are a number of things you are missing. For instance, the vertical parts of the rudders contribute to lateral resistance. As you move the rig and main foils further forward, the position of lateral resistance doesn't move forward by as much as you move those items, as the rudders stay where they are. That loads the rudders differently which can be positive but it can also be a big negative. Then you need to consider the distribution of lift between the main foils and the rudder winglets. The rudder winglets provide some lift, but they also act as stabilisers. The further away you place the main foils from the rudders, the harder the rudder winglets have to work, which increases drag. Forgetting everything else for a moment, if you stick the main foils up near the bow, the rudders need to support far more of the overall down force of the boat. Add the downforce loads from the rig (pulling in the sail pushes the bow down, easing allows the bow to come up), and you begin to see this as a 3d balancing problem. What I believe you need to do is to line up the centre of lift of all your foils (fore and aft) in relation to the centre of lateral resistance. Of course, that varies depending on conditions, point of sailing, where you stand in the boat etc., and some of those are controllable variables. What I do know is that those who have tried moving the rig and main foils a reasonable way forward have not been quick and I think we are pretty close to optimum. Interestingly, Moths have had a similar debate and some have tried pushing the rig and foils forward, but as with the A, it isn't fast. The final thing to consider is that there is also a compromise between speed and safety. I think that moving the rig and foils a long way forward might make the boat less twitchy, but that is at the expense of speed. I think this is why we see the foils on big tris so far forward - it's safe(r). You should be aware that the latest A's and Moths are designed by some of the top designers, many of who are leading development in the AC. The guys who design the Exploder A use their work on the A to help validate their VPP and they spend a ridiculous amount of time working on this stuff. Couple that with some of the best sailors doing testing and feedback, you might be surprised at what has been thought of an tested, if in some cases only in the computer (we are up to over 50 iterations of main foils, although many have stayed in the computer). Beam and foil positions are a constant source of debate, and changes have been made to optimise them. I can assure you that the position of the main beam (sailplan) , foils and rudders are considered as a whole and positioned to work together as a package.
  3. SimonN

    Prada Cup

    Sorry, but have to completely disagree. First, I am not looking at it from old monohull viewpoints, as I haven't sailed that type of boat for years. I sail foiling boats where we are doing 22-23 knots upwind (42 knots apparent windspeed) and 28-30 knots downwind. Yes, you are right that it is all about pressure, but if you are slower and go the same way, you cannot catch up. If you are behind, on the same side and get more pressure, it will not get you past a faster boat ahead and on the same side, because as you close on them the windspeed will equalise and then they are faster. Your only hope is to get a better shift or more pressure on the other side of the course. Separation is your only hope.
  4. SimonN

    Prada Cup

    Because extra manoeuvres are are a sure fire way of going faster Extra manoeuvres put you further behind and you wanted them to do them so they could get to the right side and follow Ineos. AM were slower. Going the same way as Ineos would have given them no chance. Your reading comprehension isn't great, is it. What part of "early days", "based on today" and "things could change with conditions" do you not understand? No big call or counting chickens, but based solely on today, it was clearly not a 3 horse race.
  5. SimonN

    Prada Cup

    I have so enjoyed reading how so many on here wrote Ben and the team off. Too early to really bake lots of humble pie, but most of you need to be eating some. What I cannot believe are some of the other comments being made FFS! AM looked really poor, which cannot be good for their sponsors. Why would any team sandbag to help another team's sponsors. Congrats on one of the more stupid posts. No they were not. What options do you have if you are behind and slower? Stay the same side of the course? That would never work. Their only option was to sail on the other side of the course and hope for something unexpected in terms of pressure and/or shifts. Yes, early days, but based on what we have seen today, we do not have 3 even teams. One seems significantly better than the other 2. Things could change with conditions, but based on this, it is a one horse race. For me, I hope it stays like that but for the event, I suspect others will want to see AM and LR get their acts together.
  6. SimonN

    High speed foiling mainsail control

    Let's try to put the double skin sail development into perspective. Consider the A as an example. In the case of the Heru sail and the Advance Wing Systems rigs that were done for A's, what was seen was the first iteration. When we develop a new sail (as we did for the A earlier this year), we probably built 5 or 6 test sails before getting it spot on. And that was developing an existing, fast sail. Overall, the current A rig is the result of years of development during which we have optimised the stiffness of masts (huge differences in the last 12-15 years) and refined sails every year. The A rig is already one of the most efficient rigs out there and these new rigs are trying to compete against that level of development. Looking at the Advanced Wing Systems rig, that needs mast and sail development. To do that properly, you would need to have a budget of between $150k and $200k (I discussed these figures with the person who had their A Class rig). You need to sell a lot of rigs to get that back, which means it is simply not worth it. Maybe if you are an AC team you can afford to develop this sort of rig (or have no option but to do so), but for everybody else, it's tough to make it happen.
  7. SimonN

    High speed foiling mainsail control

    Well, you would be incorrect! The correct way to measure is as normal, except where you need cross widths, when you measure from one leech to the other, going around the mast and taking that total measurement and dividing by 2. There is no problem using this type of rig on an A and it would be class legal. Again, I think you are mistaken. There is over a 1kg weight difference between masts currently being used, and my new sail is about 1.2kgs lighter than my old one, which, when new, was very, very fast. Some use synthetic rigging to reduce weight meaning there can be up to 3kgs difference between some rigs of the same height while those using shorter rigs can show bigger differences. Yet, for all of that, we hav ebeen unable to prove any speed benefit from significant weight reduction in the rig. One of the interesting developments with foiling is that it seems that weight, in every respect, is not as important as it used to be. Most boats are about 6-7kgs over minimum, rigs vary considerably and the weight range of sailors that can be competitive seems to be bigger than ever.
  8. SimonN

    High speed foiling mainsail control

    Let’s be very clear. The iFly is nowhere near close to an A Cat as was seen when the idiot responsible for them turned up at our Worlds in Weymouth. Besides getting into serious trouble with the harbourmaster for breaking the rules of the harbour and really posting the sailing centre off while needing to be rescued when there was no rescue service being offered, we saw just how slow the iFly really was against both foiling and non foiling A’s. He spent the week trying to find ways of getting faster, such as fitting an assymetric kite which didn’t work, and telling everybody how much easier and safer the iFly was compared with an A, yet he was the one who I had to get help for after he lost control, pitchpoled and broke his mast. Overall, he was rude, blocked our slipway while we were trying to launch to race and made a complete fool of himself. The iFly might be an OK boat (I prefer the S9) but all that was proven in Weymouth is that it is nothing like an A and that the owner of the company selling them is a rude, inconsiderate and delusional idiot.
  9. SimonN

    High speed foiling mainsail control

    That's not the WA rig. I haven't git any photos of it. What I do know is that in a very narrow range of wind angle and pressure, it was very fast, but for the most part, it wasn't adjustable enough to be quick through the wind range and across all sailing angles. It was always a tough call, because the A Class rig is probably the most efficient rig outside of a hard wing, because of the amount of development that has been done over such a long period of time.. I am not saying that the soft wing cannot be better, but the amount of development needed is financially too great to make it worthwhile.
  10. SimonN

    High speed foiling mainsail control

    There's guys in WA who make the gear. Done a couple of keelboats and a rig for an A Class.
  11. Your true colours are now coming out. What you have shown us is nothing short of racism. Fact - some of the best built, technically advanced boats in the world are built in China. If you are so prejudiced that you ignore that, you are a real dickhead. You have the right to decide where you buy your products from and I admire your desire to support products from your own country, but to simply trash the quality of a boat builder and their products without having seen them, just because of where they are made, is totally fucked up thinking.
  12. SimonN

    Fulcrum Speedworks Rocket

    The problem with people like you is that it's so much easier to write than to do. Dave (and Steve) have the courage of their convictions and more than a little bit of experience and they are prepared to back that with their own cash. You are happy to hide behind a made up name on a forum, with zero skin in the game and offer "advice" based on little more than having sailed and owned sailboats. It appears you are so tone deaf that you don't realise that your unsolicited "advise" is badly phrased and very arrogant. I doubt Dave and Steve mind people giving feedback, but you think you are above that and believe you are capable of advising them. Even if you did have some valid points, I would keep well away from somebody with such a poor attitude. Good luck, Dave (and Steve). You seem to have done pretty well out of following your own beliefs of what there is a market for and I am sure you will be rewarded for yet again having the courage of your convictions. Only bad news I can foresee is that from everything I know about boat building, another successful product will mean even less spare time, less sailing and no holidays. I hope you get what you deserve!!
  13. SimonN

    INEOS Team GB

    It's easy to tell they are sailing downwind, because of the position of the traveller. Never seen them going upwind with the traveller eased. Same applies to ETNZ.
  14. Hey, Newbie. Do you work for LP? If not, why post totally inaccurate bullshit? You can buy an Ovington full size rig for GBP6,300 with alloy mast or GBP6850 with carbon top mast. Why do you think the price will be over GBP10,000. There is no reason to believe any other builder will be significantly cheaper. There's a word for people like you.....TROLL.
  15. SimonN

    INEOS Team GB

    I know you said it was a joke, but you keep repeating to make a point, so you must believe that there is something more than a joke in what you say. In 2 boat match racing, if you have a speed advantage, the last thing you want to do is to engage properly before the start. There are only 2 priorities. First is to ensure the boat stays in one piece (rather than get damaged like Ainslie did last time) and second, not getting a penalty. Most of the time, that will mean you "lose" the start. Sometimes losing the start is the winning move.
  16. SimonN

    A-Class foiling sailors

    Just a smartphone in a waterproof bag.
  17. SimonN

    A-Class foiling sailors

    Looks like the same one that our training group uses. Plugs into a mobile phone and we do a conference call to each other. We have used this with 4 on the water. We use the BB Talkin sports headset. Phone goes in lifejacket pocket
  18. I call bullshit. I have spoken to world class sailors and coaches, and they cannot see a difference, so how can you? Have you even seen the 2 boats side by side? I do understand how the boats are built (have you ever been in a Laser factory?). I also know about the work that has gone on to ensure the new builders are up to speed and that the boats not only comply with the construction manual, but have no advantage over other builders. I know the hoops the new builders have needed to go through with their prototypes to ensure uniformity. Besides all of that, I also know that the new builders have bought into the idea that they should all build equal boats, because they understand that if there really are differences, it will screw the future of the class. There are 2 things that enable such an old design to continue to thrive - numbers and uniformity. As soon as one builder has an advantage, the whole thing goes wrong.; Support for the class to remain not only in the Olympics but as the premier single handed dinghy that can be used for all categories (junior, female, open etc). Lose that one design confidence and there will be calls for another class to replace the ILCA/Laser.
  19. SimonN

    A-Class foiling sailors

    A cautionary tale...... Yesterday, I had my first capsize for well over a year, and it was one of the biggest I have ever had in an A. Conditions were a bit unusual - 10-15 knots gusting 22 and 40 degree c temperatures, so it was like sailing in a hair dryer. Travelling upwind, one minute we were not foiling and then the boat was leaping out all over the place. I hooked into one puff and the boat was out of control. The others were doing over 22 knots steady and I was going noticeably faster. The bow was rising and the boat was also coming over on top of me. I still cannot work out exactly what happened but very, very suddenly I was heading forward and I hit the boat somewhere between the main beam and the forestay, landing on my forearm/elbow. I slid over the top of the deck and ended up in front of the main beam. During all of this, my helmet got ripped off (despite the strap being properly tightened), I lost my sunnies, and hat. The compass bracket was ripped off the main beam. Strangely, the compass itself came off the bracket and floated, so I could grab that but the bracket was gone. I was in a world of hurt, particularly my arm which I couldn't really use. One of my team mates picked me up and I dropped him next to my boat, and he got it up and I limped home. Another team mate found my helmet, so in the end, I was down a compass bracket and a pair of prescription sunnies. Remarkably, there are no dents in the boat. A few lessons stand out. I am pretty sure that without a helmet, we would have had a pretty serious situation. Besides a bruised arm, I have some whiplash in my neck today. If I hadn't been sailing with a group, I am not sure what would have happened. I don't sail on my own, because I know people who have swum home after the boat has drifted away, but this has reinforced this. Maybe without friends, I wouldn't have been pushing so hard. So please wear a helmet, make sure it is properly done up and if you do sail alone, have a strategy planned for what happens if you cannot self rescue. The other lessons are about how you sail the boat. First thing to note is that upwind is way more wild than downwind, even though downwind you are probably going 6 knots faster. On a well set up A, 26-7 knots downwind really is armchair sailing, once you have some experience. I wonder whether upwind will ever feel like that (I doubt it). Maybe what I should have done is to not foil in the big gusts, but the top guys are doing that and as that is who I am training with, I don't want to be left behind. For me, the most interesting learning has been about foot loops and where to stand. Up until now, I have always foiled upwind with my rear foot in the front loop and a wide stance, because I felt I needed the foot in the loop for security. That didn't help me at all yesterday! What my tuning mates do is to walk the gunwale far more, so in the big gusts, they are trapezing level with the shrouds. With the mainsheet on hard, I now realise that this position is more locked in than being further back with a foot in a loop. Think about it - if the mainsheet is pulling you inboard and back a bit, the chances of flying forward are far less. The crash yesterday was the one I have been fearing and that fear has probably held me back. I was keeping my foot in the loop because I believed that it would stop what actually happened. Knowing that, and believing it would have been safer if I had stepped a lot further forward, next time I sail (hopefully the swelling, bruises and stiffness go by next weekend), I will be practicing "walking the gunwale" while foiling and learning how secure I now believe that it should be. Stay safe!
  20. If anybody can tell a difference between an Ovington and a PSA by looking, then something has gone very, very wrong with the class and you might as well pack up and forget the class.
  21. SimonN

    INEOS Team GB

    Despite all the "a man down the pub" rumours, there is nothing I have seen to suggest Ineos is slow and there is a a lot to like. I am a fan of their tacks and gybes, which seem to be more "carved" than AM and LR, who appear to change direction very fast. The timing of their foil up/down also seems good. My guess would be more speed early in the tack, less leeway on the new tack they accelerate but slower out of the tack. Overall, it's a different way of tacking and I suspect if they get it right, it improves VMG. I wonder if they have the quick tack ability as well.
  22. SimonN

    INEOS Team GB

    Upwind, hard to say. Ineos seemed slow to accelerate after a tack which made them look slower that AM. Downwind, a fair amount of separation, so hard to see for sure but Ineos looked faster and lower to me. What can we conclude from this? Nothing!
  23. SimonN

    Emirates Team New Zealand.

    If we really were trying to fix it, surely it would say that while nobody could race on that course during the preliminaries, ETNZ could train on it when the others couldn't. That gave ETNZ an advantage, one that they recognised when writing and agreeing to the original protocol. I don't really believe that ETNZ did anything to put themselves in an advantageous position and I don't believe the port was trying to do that either. However, the effect of what the port wanted to impose did give ETNZ an advantage.
  24. SimonN

    INEOS Team GB

    PB might be tagged as skipper, but Glenn is his boss. Having seen Glenn, Pete and Blair working together, I think this discussion is probably mute as they don't really see a distinction between themselves, which is probably why they are all just listed as "sailor".