joneisberg

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About joneisberg

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  1. joneisberg

    Ugly dodger collection

    One of my favorite views from the cockpit spoiled... Guy must have gotten one hell of a deal on that fabric...
  2. joneisberg

    Ugly dodger collection

    Truly impressive craftsmanship and woodworking skills do not necessarily a beautiful dodger make... ;-) I'll bet laying on a touch-up coat of Epifanes on the underside of this lid is gonna be fun, eh?
  3. joneisberg

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    LMFAO! Yup, that's perfect, alright... ;-) Except I'm not sure most Little Old Ladies would be able to climb up into that settee/sofa/loveseat/whatever the hell it is on the port side, that thing had to be one of the more curious things I've ever seen on a boat of that size. I don't know what size human that thing was configured for - I'm 6' 5", and my feet were practically dangling above the cabin sole when I sat on it... I can't imagine how it would be comfortable for anyone...Plus, it was way too short to even curl up on in anything short of a fetal position, the only utility it really had was as a step up into the pilot berth... Without question, FAIRWEATHER is a stunning example of the finest Maine craftsmanship, and Lyman Morse's in particular... However, there is some pretty weird shit going on inside that one, for sure... ;-)
  4. joneisberg

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    You did a great job with that rudder, Bob... FAIRWEATHER was beautifully balanced, really an awesome sailing machine... Agree about the layout, I can only imagine the 'traffic problems' that would occur with more than 2 people aboard... Far and away the boat's best feature, were the pilot berths... If I could die in my sleep, I couldn't imagine a better place than the leeward one aboard that boat while sailing a reach, those things were incredible underway ;-) Really a pity that pilot berths have all but disappeared from production boats today... Scariest thing about that boat, to me, was attending to the engine... It was set deep down below the galley, and that entire galley assembly had to be lifted up by a pair of hydraulic rams to reveal the engine... With all that Corian or granite or whatever countertop space, that whole deal must have weighed 1,000 pounds... All I could think of while lying underneath it to check the oil, is a French guillotine... ;-) Really would have been nice to have had some provision to prop the whole deal up with some sort of additional locking support strut, but I never noticed any such thing... I think a dark hull would improve her looks immeasurably, those portlights against the white hull definitely spoil it, for me... You may recall, I took her out around Hatteras in late January of that year... When we got into Charleston, we met up with the only other crew to have been dumb enough to be out there that time of year... The one aboard one of your Stevens 53s, as a matter of fact... ;-)
  5. joneisberg

    Paris (Kiwi Spirit) calls it quits

    Wow, the list of CRUISING WORLD Globe-Girdling Cover Girls who never fulfilled their Mission Statement grows ever longer... ;-) On a serious note, I certainly hope there's not some health issue or similar with Mr Paris that's driving this decision...
  6. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    Probably the closest I've ever come to falling off a large boat, was after slipping on an undetected hydraulic leak onto a side deck, at night... In flat calm water, @ 300 feet above sea level, on the freakin' ERIE CANAL, of all places... :-) One of the primary reasons why I suggested the use of the tender as a possible means of attempting the transfer to the OCEAN CRESCENT... I think it's likely very fortunate that they never really had the opportunity to try to step off RAINMAKER and scamper up those cargo nets... One slip, someone falls in the gap between the boat and that steel wall, and you could easily have a someone crushed to death in an instant... I'm very content to sail a boat of a size modest enough that I have no need of hydraulics whatsoever, other than the fluid that goes into my little Hurth gearbox... :-)
  7. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    Yes, probably the single most dangerous innovation in modern multihulls.Yep. Can be. I have an Atlantc 55 -- it has two steering stations. When it turns to shite, I use the outside steering position because the situational awareness inside really sucks... Also, the outside station is conventional cable (vs. hydraulic on the inside wheel) so much better to feel loading on the rudders. Excellent point... Hell, it ain't just on multihulls, either... With the proliferation of full cockpit enclosures on cruising boats today, it's astonishing how insulated from their surroundings many drivers of such boats have become inside their clear vinyl cocoons... Few better examples of this, than when running a faster powerboat on the ICW... Coming up behind the vast majority of fully enclosed boats plowing along, it is virtually guaranteed they'll be completely unaware of your approach, until you've gotten their attention with a horn signal, a VHF call, or having to run far enough up alongside until you're in their peripheral vision... Even folks like Hamish and Kate Laird, who run high latitude charters in places like Antarctica and Greenland aboard their Chuck Paine-designed expedition yacht SEAL, declined to have an inside steering station, feeling it is far more important to be on deck in such harsh environments, in order to be better attuned to changing conditions...
  8. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    Is there really any meaningful chance that the Gunboat people would be silly enough to think that they could bury something like that? That sort of strategy usually backfires quite badly. In Ireland, an incident like this would probably lead to an enquiry by the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB), who are very thorough. In the UK, an investigation would be conducted by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB), who are also very thorough. What about the USA? I see that the NTSB investigates "significant accidents", which I guess wouldn't apply here. Will there be a Coast Guard enquiry? Seems doubtful... Has anyone ever seen of heard of an official CG 'report' on the loss of the Alpha 42 last January, for instance?
  9. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    Personally, if I had the scoop on what had happened when nobody else had the story, I'd be very careful about diluting its impact by releasing core points before publication. I might release the occasional teaser, but that's all. We'll just have to wait. Until after the Miami Show closes on Monday evening, would be my guess... ;-) Yup, this is not exactly the Woodward/Bernstein approach, that's for sure... ;-)
  10. joneisberg

    My newest project

    Sweet looking boat, Bob, really nice to see something like that still being drawn these days, I love it... Like many others, however, I'm trying to wrap my mind around the twin engines on such a boat... Someone's gotta ask, is the client actually a Sailor? He's familiar with the concept of 'drag', I presume? I understand the client is always right, but it seems he might be wanting that setup for all the wrong reasons... I hope you're gonna draw the line at designing a full cockpit enclosure for Mr Lucky, however... ;-)) Based on my experience with powerboats, I have a hard time picturing twins placed 40 inches apart affording too much in the way of additional maneuvering ability around the marina, especially with a full keeled boat... That's not gonna spin 360's like a cat, or a Sea Ray - at least not very easily... And, I would think she's still gonna need a bowthruster... With that cutaway forefoot, sheer/bowsprit and amount of windage forward (I'm assuming headsails will be on furlers, no?), once the wind catches that bow, she'll be GONE, despite the 20 HP twin diesels... The underbody reminds me a bit of Chuck Paine's Cabo Rico 42, and when maneuvering that boat in close quarters in a good breeze, the bow thruster could not possibly have been undersized, you always wanted more... Without a thruster, certain tricky maneuvers simply, particularly when backing down, simply would not have been possible...
  11. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    I don't recall anyone suggesting a boat to be launched from the ship... What Joli and I were referring to, was the potential use of RAINMAKER's tender to come alongside... Looks like the OCEAN CRESCENT does have a smaller outboard-powered tender in addition to their one way lifeboat. However, any attempt to launch it from that position on the ship, in a seaway, would present a very high level of risk, and the possibility of being crushed beneath that stern quarter overhang with a large sea running... If indeed RAINMAKER did come close to "getting sucked into the ship's prop", wouldn't be surprising if she suffered heavy additional damage due to a crushing blow from that stern quarter... As you've said, it's completely unreasonable to expect the crew of such ships to put one of their own boats over the side. Those crews are simply not trained for such work... It's a bit different for a cruise ship like the NORWEGIAN GEM to launch one of their large shore tenders as was done in the rescue of the Beneteau SANCTUARY a few years ago, but that video I posted earlier clearly shows the extraordinary difficulty and danger involved in the recovery of the tender in a seaway... There was a very lengthy and contentious thread on Sailnet a couple of years ago, surrounding the abandonment of the Gulfstar 50 TRIUMPH about 700 NM east of Cape Cod, and the rescue of the crew by the 900' KIM JACOB, a participant in the AMVER program... Absolutely amazing, how some folks were arguing that the crews of AMVER ships should undergo additional training, to be able to better assist yachties abandoning their boats at sea.... ;-)
  12. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    I guess I'd be reluctant to call those Bene "Sense" models with the huge cockpit leading down into the boat a viable candidate for Cat A on that criteria (amongst many others, to be sure.) I understand that racing boats frequently have open sterns, and that many production boats have followed their lead. I suppose by this criteria VOR60s are suspect, so the rule needs tweaking, but those are race boats crewed by professional half-man half-beasts who sail with hair afire while eating nails. (And their cockpit has many more handholds.) IMO, a family cat should really have more protection if intended for extended offshore use. Not sure who is "hating"... I love Gunboats! I am not a pro or in the market for one, so my opinion doesn't mean a thing, but I am interested in how design choices should impact routing decisions. Compare the Atlantic yachts (or the GB60, or 66) with RM and pick which one you'd prefer for a crazy mid winter storm. It's a no-brainer. But pick the one for 99% of the rest of sailing, and you would likely pick the GB 55. It's awesome for a group of friends, tearing around St Maarten during the 'round Island race, or screaming around the Chesapeake, out of Miami to the Bahamas. Phenomenal for 100% of the sailing I'd like to be doing right now. Philly, I guess that I really don't have a problem the routing decision. Rainmaker was moving along fine until hit by a freak storm and dismasted. If they had left and hour earlier, or an hour later, they would have missed that squall and would be drinking dark and stormies at the Soggy Dollar in Jost with Pyrat right now. It was not a design flaw, it was bad luck. I think that mother nature can conjur up something that will kick the shit out of any boat almost any place and leave it disabled. As captain Ron said, "If it is going to happen, it will happen out there." If you don't cast off your lines you will never go anywhere. "Freak storm", huh? Yeah, probably the first time one of those has ever occurred 200 NM SE of Hatteras, in late January... ;-) Sure, and if only that Alpha 42 last winter had been 100 meters to port, or starboard, when that 'rogue wave' came along, nothing else could have possibly gone amiss for the duration of that passage... Certainly, Mother Nature can conjure up some nasty surprises anytime, anywhere... Seems to happen with a bit more regularity in the North Atlantic, in the dead of winter, however...
  13. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    This came up on Mr Johnstone's Facebook page, a posting from Meagan Jones, and a pic of her posing with some assorted SAR equipment: I take that to indicate that fancy GOST tracking/monitoring system isn't workng, and they're gonna be looking for a needle in a haystack...
  14. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    Perhaps this incident will give some indication whether this system is really up to snuff? http://www.marinelink.com/news/catamarans-security362102.aspx Given the heavy weather in the immediate aftermath of the abandonment, I've felt all along that the odds of recovery might be a bit longer than many might have assumed... Even with the resources available to be thrown at it, it's got to be a VERY challenging assignment... One of the more curious reports came from the initial write-up in YACHTING WORLD, that claimed that the CG had "placed a tracking device" aboard RAINMAKER... I can't recall that having been done before with a yacht being abandoned, and watching the rescue videos, it's obvious the rescue swimmer has higher priorities, and never appears to get close enough to the vessels to transfer a tracking device to anyone still aboard... Perhaps someone has better information re this? In any event, it would certainly seem understandable if those involved in the search and recovery might choose to keep mum until the boat is back alongside a dock somewhere... Sure hope they manage to accomplish that, but given the recent history of yachts being abandoned offshore, it would be somewhat in the realm of a 'First'... Didn't happen. Thanks... Good to hear I guessed right, for once... ;-)
  15. joneisberg

    PLEASE SAY A PRAYER FOR RAINMAKER'S CREW

    Perhaps this incident will give some indication whether this system is really up to snuff? http://www.marinelink.com/news/catamarans-security362102.aspx Given the heavy weather in the immediate aftermath of the abandonment, I've felt all along that the odds of recovery might be a bit longer than many might have assumed... Even with the resources available to be thrown at it, it's got to be a VERY challenging assignment... One of the more curious reports came from the initial write-up in YACHTING WORLD, that claimed that the CG had "placed a tracking device" aboard RAINMAKER... I can't recall that having been done before with a yacht being abandoned, and watching the rescue videos, it's obvious the rescue swimmer has higher priorities, and never appears to get close enough to the vessels to transfer a tracking device to anyone still aboard... Perhaps someone has better information re this? In any event, it would certainly seem understandable if those involved in the search and recovery might choose to keep mum until the boat is back alongside a dock somewhere... Sure hope they manage to accomplish that, but given the recent history of yachts being abandoned offshore, it would be somewhat in the realm of a 'First'...