dash34

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About dash34

  • Rank
    Super Anarchist
  • Birthday 09/06/1957

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  • Location
    Nanaimo, B.C.
  • Interests
    Sailing my boat, playing bass and classical guitar, flying sailplanes, skiing, cycling and hiking.

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  1. dash34

    R2AK 2018

    It's blowing nicely in Nanaimo right now. We call it the "night north-westerly". I don't thinkit will make it far enough south for the boats near Saturna to pick it up.
  2. dash34

    R2AK 2018

    If it is the same bunch of trackers that were used for Swiftsure, it is a mixture of Gen II and Gen III Spot units. Gen II has a max 10 minute update. Gen III can do three minutes but you have to pay big bucks for the extra updates. My guess is that they are all on 10 minute updates. Spot position updates are not 100% reliable either.
  3. dash34

    everybody doin' it?

    I think this works best on boats with a lot of power in the sail plan, easily driven hulls and very narrow sheeting angles. They can afford to lose a bit of power in the main in order to gain a degree or two of point. Hence why we see the TP 52's doing this a lot. In the case of the boat in the picture, it has a very narrow sheeting angle, and it looks like a pretty good breeze, so they might be able to get away with this. I'd be surprised if it was an efficient way to sail upwind if the boat has a traditional underbody. The other factor in this is the keel, which might stall if the boat is going too slow in this mode. You would have to build speed first, then go into this mode. It won't work on every boat and it won't work in all conditions. I can sail like this all day on my 6kt shitbox if I only want to go 4 kts and take a lot of leeway due to keel stall.
  4. dash34

    Protection or pressure - kid decisions

    This. In my school district the powers that be are bringing back an initiative that failed miserably in the late 90's, hoping that it will work this time around. Somehow the system managers just can't seem to manage the change that is needed, instead they impose change that isn't needed, and hang on to bizarre practices like the one above because "that's the way we have always done it." Talk to your kid, tell him you are ready to fight for him, but only if he really wants to go down that path, then sit back and listen.
  5. dash34

    Protection or pressure - kid decisions

    Teacher and parent here. Definitely talk to the teacher and your son, but there is another argument to consider. In the advanced class the peer group will be motivated, intelligent kids who get things done. In the less advanced class there will be smart kids who are a bit less motivated, and kids who are a bit less smart. Peer groups are really important and can make or break a student's success in any particular class. I would fight to have your son in the advanced class based on the GPA and not the test, unless your son tells you that he definitely does not want to be in that class or the teacher advises strongly against it for some reason. In addition, advanced classes are often taught by more experienced teachers. You didn't hear that from me.
  6. dash34

    F1 2018...

    Yes. Link
  7. Solenoids use electromagnets. Electromagnets use coils which are low resistance and draw a lot of current. What is needed is a solenoid that stays open by electrostatic rather than magnetic force. There aren't any that I can find. A good second best would be a circuit that uses an electromagnet to open the valve, then cuts off the current to the electromagnet. The valve is held open using a permanent magnet. If the user selects close, or If power is lost, a second circuit with stored charge (eg. in a capacitor) is triggered to drive the current in the electromagnet the opposite way, closing the valve. The valve is held closed by a second permanent magnet. Not 100% fool proof but better than nothing.
  8. dash34

    F1 2018...

    Ah yes, turn F1 into the hunger games. Randomly flatten a tire, take 100 hp off an engine, but allow fans to pay to fix the problems.
  9. dash34

    No Swiftsure thread?

    That was always good clean racing between Seven and the Dashes. I remember those times too, and yes, I too am getting old. I have had a Dash for 36 years but this will be the last. dash
  10. dash34

    No Swiftsure thread?

    The only success I have had sailing the boat in these conditions was with 13 crew and a full main with a blade in 25-30. Anyone who was on the boat that day still talks about it. Now that was fun! It proves that adding righting moment is the answer. Having sailed on FD with a bulb on the keel, the boat was definitely much better upwind in a breeze than a normal Dash.
  11. dash34

    No Swiftsure thread?

    I think adding heel would have resulted in so much additional leeway it would overcome any benefit. That U-shaped structure does cause a lot of pounding, resulting in the need to bear off to get speed. The main needs constant attention upwind, and you really have to feel what the boat is doing in your butt to get it right. More or less every time the helm moves the stick the main has to move. It makes a huge difference. You can see on our track a significant change in our course about half way across. The wind didn't change, we changed drivers and main-trimmers. One thing I am thinking about doing, now that I have moved the head aft, is adding a structural stiffener on the port side between the aft collision bulkhead and the main bulkhead, similar to the one on the starboard side. In addition, the cockpit floor should be attached to the hull rather than suspended. A lightweight carbon structure is all that is needed, and would probably result in a lot stiffer boat. I suspect the backstay tension is changing a lot when the boat pounds upwind. We used the checkstays upwind on Saturday and that helped stop the rig pumping. I think I will probably sell the boat before I get around to these two modifications, however. Right now I am just able to keep up with the maintenance of what is already there. We are doing all the VIRS races this year and I have my fingers in too many other pies as well.
  12. dash34

    No Swiftsure thread?

    I always thought the shudder was the keel vibrating on its mounts plus the rig shaking. But yes, it was the chop that was the problem, and not being able to carry enough sail to power through it. I think we didn't have enough twist in our sail plan. We would have been better off with one less reef and a ton of twist. Maybe.
  13. dash34

    No Swiftsure thread?

    18-25 kts true and 4-5' steep short shop. We ended up with two reefs and the blade - we were experiencing some lee helm so might have been better to go one reef and the storm sail. The chop was bad enough that waves were breaking completely over the boat from time to time. Our permanent backstay (1/8 inch 1 x 19 wire) shredded from the mast whip. BTW the blade I bought from you is awesome! Yes, they relented and Dyneema lifelines were allowed! In gratitude I replaced mine with nice new ones just before the race. My local rigging shop has offered to strength test the old ones - that will be very interesting!
  14. Whether sportys should compete with leadmines depends on what the local conditions are. If the local conditions are heavy air upwind beating into big waves where the leadmines have an advantage, the sporties might be complaining about things the other way around.
  15. dash34

    No Swiftsure thread?

    That beat to Clallam Bay won't be on my list of favorite beats ever (absolutely brutal conditions for a Dash 34 - the boat hates that stuff, plus we went the wrong way), but the downwind was a blast!