PeterHuston

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  1. I've sailed on this boat a lot. It has tons of headroom.
  2. Prevailing opinion I have heard more than once, at least as it applies to OracleAUSNZL, is that your crime is simply being American.
  3. Respect, for both of you, and anyone else who puts their life on the line. House next door to me burned down once. Staggering that there was no damage to any of the adjacent homes. All because of guys like you. Thanks.
  4. remember watermoc had to have the entire keel removed after it was found to be ever so slightly, totally and completely, in the wrong place attention to detail with that builder was never a strong suit And wait, there's more....keel was asymmetrical and I think the rudder wasn't square to the centerline either. Felt like a totally different boat after it came out of the yard.
  5. Here's the boat the OP bought. http://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1979/C-%26-C-Custom-43-2611436/Detroit/MI/United-States#.WPduUlLMz-Y
  6. I sailed on that boat a lot when it lived in Buffalo. Nice boat, no terrible habits, other than a bit of the typical IOR rolling downwind in breeze. Jibs are massive - get very large people to grind.
  7. In my opinion W/L is adding to the decline in racing in general, regardless of handicap system. Take the Mass Bay schedule for instance. There are 10 north shore qualifying regattas, of which 9 are generally W/L and the other is an overnight distance race. There are 8 qualifiers on the South Shore, and 3 are generally W/L and the other 5 are round islands or government marks. So 12 regattas, around 15 days of racing, 3 races per day, 2 laps per race. 90 sets and douses... BIRW is 4 days of W/L and one RTI and everyone looks forward to the RTI. I can't believe I'm the only one who thinks racing two lap W/L and then getting 10 minutes to shove a sandwich down your throat before you do it all over again turns into a grind. That's always been my issue. It's not the racing in and of itself, when on the course I'm usually having a great time. It's the cumulative grind that comes from doing more or less the same exact thing over and over again. I can't tell you the number of times I've been talking with the other people I sail with about a given race and we struggle to place which regatta it was part of. On the other hand it generally costs even more money to be competitive in distance racing so there is that trade-off. What I don't understand is the reluctance to have any course other than w/l, with a start to weather. Why not have downwind starts from time to time. Triangle and/or gold cup courses. A day race around government marks. The way we promote sailing, even to ourselves, is like the old Saturday Night Live skit about the store that sold only one type of scotch tape - that was the ONLY thing they sold. Aren't we smarter than this? (I guess not).
  8. All of this history really struck a chord with me as I was paying attention to it all, a bit too young to sail in the SORC at the time. I can't remember the exact year it happened, maybe the spring of '74 or '75, a guy I knew very well, who was a mentor, Al Bernel, bought the centerboard 27.5 one tonner Robin and brought it to Buffalo, renamed it Abino Robin, the Abino coming from Point Abino, which is the point about 10 miles west of Buffalo on the north shore of Lake Erie, which is a summer community and sailing mecca for the Lightning class. It was the first real custom boat on which I sailed. I was in high school at the time. There was a Lightning Class connection to all of it, most of the crew were older Lightning sailors, as was Bernel initially. That boat which drew, I think, 11 feet, with the board down, had the most special motion upwind of any boat on which I have ever sailed to this day. Of all the one and two tonners, sleds, Swans, canting keel boats, nothing felt like Robin upwind in any sort of breeze. It would go like two forward and then one to weather. Rudder was two part, with the lower part capable of being retracted into the upper part, I think there as less than two feet of rudder in the water downwind. In the fall of '79 when I was done with college and moved to Newport Beach, I walked into Eichenlaub's yard in San Diego, introduced myself, told him I wanted to talk about Lightnings, because he had won 2 North American's and had built arguably the best boats for conditions with chop/lighter air. Actually got him to come out of retirement, and he crewed for me in the California Lightning circuit in one regatta. The first day I met him, within an hour, the next thing I knew he had figured out I had sailed on Robin, and was booking me a flight to San Francisco to sail on Cadenza in the Cal Coastal Race. Over the next year or so I sort of almost lived in his yard, and got to hear about all his history, especially with Peterson, and Ganbare. In the fall of '79 he was building two Peterson fractional rig boats - one of them was Forte, for Art DeFever and Tom Tobin. I think they finished 2rd or 3rd in their class in the SORC and pretty close to that overall. The other boat was for a Mexican guy who stopped making payments, the boat hung around for a while unfinished, and Barney Flam bought it, turned it into Flambouyant which won everything in Long Beach for a long time. While my parents hated the fact I was just messing around with boats, I got a Masters, if not PhD, in boat building/design and overall sailing theory hanging out with one of the true masters of the game. I got to see first hand so much that came out of the west coast at the tail end of the golden era of yacht racing through and with Carl. There isn't enough space in this forum to detail all I was privileged to see, learn and know. The mention of Robin Two II above made me put that into google, and one of the first things that was returned was this article from Sports Illustrated. Hearing about High Roller made me think about the day I spent with Carl and Bill Powers talking about what Carl would do to tweak the boat for him. Williwaw....there's a complex story. https://www.si.com/vault/1979/02/26/823396/and-so-now-we-are-seven-robin-had-reached-an-advanced-age-in-the-sorc-but-after-several-appearances-under-different-names-for-different-owners-she-was-doing-her-thing-again#
  9. Top fell off.
  10. It was a result of HHN92 talking in the AC forum about his enjoyment of the SuperSeries that he would watch online that got me first interested a year or so ago, then when a close friend started to sail on one of the boats, I started to pay more attention. I watched as much as time allowed both online via the tracker and then video from Key West, and then again this past week. Yes, there is a bit of a lag between video and tracker, but even with Ellison's money and Stan Honey's brain, that problem existed in AC 34 too. It's hardly a disqualifier, and I enjoyed both formats. Andi does a nice job tying everything together, and Stu does a great job on the water. If he can't go to Europe, then get someone like Genny Tulloch to do on the water, though that said, the series and a sponsor would be really smart to put her at the helm of a 52. One of the things I like the most are the FB lives that Andi does walking about the container area after the race, talking with the sailors. It puts a human face on sailing that is completely absent in the AC, where everything is scripted and constricted. Great job all around, I'll be back and telling others to watch.
  11. It's the IOC, TV ad sales people, and WS staff, looking for money. Period. who would watch that on tv? it's not as if there is no limit to the number of events the olympics can or will run..., you need to consider the opportunity cost if the aim is to maximize ad revenue.., having offshore sailing, instead of just about anything else is a big mistake anyway, i think it's i dumb idea Actually, I think the concept was not so much for TV as it is for internet consumption. The IOC is just about making money, and WS is just about doing whatever makes the IOC happy. It's beyond a dumb idea, at least when considering what most of the world thinks the Olympics is about. If you accept the reality that the Olympics is just a sports reality show and you pay to play and of you win, you might make a buck or two, then fine. Probably the US team would be something like Gronkowski and one of the Kardashians.
  12. It's the IOC, TV ad sales people, and WS staff, looking for money. Period.
  13. I am told that was proposed at the last WS Executive Cmte meeting.
  14. Just heard from a friend sailing in this regatta that the French boat broke their rig today in practice.
  15. If you, or others, have not seen this by Lauderdale YC Comm Peter Commette, well worth a read: Idiotic response to sad circumstance. Here is where Lauderdale Yacht Club is so far as of late last night (our talking points in the following still are a work in progress); Coral Reef YC also is mobilizing behind Commodore Doug Broeker, as is Florida YC, with Hal Gilreath leading: In response to our contacts, Jay Shannon, one of Gary Farmer's lead staff members, wants to meet with Lauderdale Yacht Club and get our input. He wants to "fix" the bill, because apparently it was his mistake in drafting which did not protect and exempt yacht clubs, boating clubs, and other training facilities My answer I have sent him back with is that the entire bill is a mistake with regard to all boating. I have agreed to set up a meeting with Jay, but we still want to meet with Gary, too. They need to know that this is our position going in, not just a "fix" for junior sailboat racing. Lots of good fishing families and cruisers are outraged, too, not just sailors. It would be a cop-out for LYC to the boating community, as well as our Members, if we were to seek a "fix" for only the sailing aspect of the boating seamanship we represent and teach. Jay and Gary need to wake up to their misguided follow through on good intentions. Moreover, back to sailing. As Commodore, I want my young junior sailors to be able to practice on their own, which his considered "fix" wouldn't cover. Statistics from our Fleet Captain, Ted Morley, don't even support senator Farmer's position: The following is taken from the State of Florida from 2015 (last full report issued): · Florida had 737 boating accidents; that is 103 more accidents as compared to 2014, however, there was a 25 percent decrease in fatalities. A total of 55 people lost their lives last year in boating accidents. Falls overboard have been the leading type of fatal accident since 2003 with drowning as the leading cause of death and 87% of these victims were not wearing a life jacket. · None of these accidents or fatalities involved a junior sailor in a YC activity · To obtain recreational boating credentials, the State of Florida requires all Florida residents born after January 1, 1988 who operate powered watercraft 10 horsepower or greater, to carry a Florida Boating Safety Education Identification Card. (Farmer’s bill goes beyond what the law actually requires) · You must be at least 14 years old to operate a personal watercraft, and it is illegal to lease, hire, or rent a personal watercraft to anyone under 18 years old. · Nationwide there were 5560 accidents reported, with only 53 of these involving sailboats, with 2 deaths reported on sailboats as a result of drowning- that’s less than 1% of the deaths attributed to sailboats (a lower percentage than SUPs), and zero fatalities onboard sailboats for the 0-19 year old age bracket. This information is attainable by searching the FWC and USCG/DHS websites for the reports. They compile very specific details on accidents. Looking at the data, Gary Farmer's bill has little merit when you look at what, or who, he is targeting. This is a parent area into which government is intruding. The government has no business taking over the responsibility of parents who have historically trained millions of children on safe and competent boating. I absolutely believe that this is an overreaction over the loss of two boys, the overreaction fueled by those who are completely unfamiliar with how ubiquitous boating is among young people throughout Florida, coastal communities and inland. Fact is: nature is dangerous. Kids climbing trees fall out of them and get injured and die. Skiing. Gymnastics. Swimming. Climbing. Hiking. Walking in the woods. Walking near a lake at Disneyworld. All potentially life-threatening. People of all ages die in nature due to poor judgment. Here in Florida with respect to our #1 activity, boating, it's up to parents and the community to teach responsible seamanship, not the State. This bill needs a matching bill out of the house. Probably won't happen, but we cannot take that chance. It needs to be killed at Gary Farmer's desk and now. Mobilize, both as groups and individuals. Write the senator at: farmer.gary.web@flsenate.gov Bruce Burton, president of US Sailing, and Gary Jobson are meeting today to discuss US Sailing's response. The Florida Council of Yacht Clubs will discuss the bill at its next meeting and I am told intends a response. Do your part and inundate Gary Farmer with emails on behalf of all boaters.