KONeill

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About KONeill

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  1. KONeill

    Hobie 16 Rebuild

    Ha, yeah probably. I think my goal was $25/hr, but I doubt I actually hit that. Still not too bad as a side hustle, at the time I was tutoring math for a living and anything that got me outside for a few hours was good in my book.
  2. KONeill

    Hobie 16 Rebuild

    There were a ton of soft-deck H16s in the Dallas area when I was in college in Denton. I used to fix them for $100 a hull. I don't have any pictures, it was 30 years ago, but the technique I came up with was: Day 1: Poke around and figure out the extent of the soft spot. It can't go too close to the pylon where the deck curves or too far out to the edge of the deck. A lot of these only had a soft spot 6" x 12" or so, just from people standing on it. As long as it's not way out to the edges this will work. Make a template of what you're going to cut out of the deck from cardboard. Put a center line on it from the bow to the pylon, and measure how far it is from the pylon. Duct tape over the whole repair area, and tape some cut up tarps to the sides so you don't get epoxy on them. Lay two layers of 6oz cloth in epoxy on the duct tape. Then lay a layer of cedar strips in thickened epoxy on the wet cloth. I used to have a jig that would cut cedar 1x2s into the same thickness as the deck foam. Clean off the top of the cedar with a rag and lay a couple of strips of duct tape over the whole thing to hold it down. Day 2: Take the template out and mark on the top of the cedar with a sharpie. Cut out the whole thing, cedar and glass and deck, all in place, with a jigsaw. If you poked around right at the start the deck edges still on the boat look fine. If not you have to dig out some bad foam and stick some cedar in thickened epoxy in there, which is a pain in the ass. Now separate the glass and cedar from the deck section. Take the top of the old deck section you cut out from the boat and scrape off all the old foam and crap and sand the underside down, and epoxy it on top of the cedar/glass. Glue this on the other hull just to make sure the curve stays more or less right. Glue in a lip under the edges of the deck for the patch to sit in. I used strips of 1/8" plywood with 6oz glass on top. Day 3: Butter up the edges of the patch with thickened epoxy and drop it in. Duct tape down to get good contact with the lip underneath. If you're in a hurry you can start the other hull now. Day 4: Sand down any excess and lay a 2" glass cloth strip along the join. Day 5: Sand the cloth down so it doesn't look so awful. I didn't know about peelply back then so it was a pretty ugly repair, there was a big scar around the deck, but the decks were hard as hell and they lasted forever. I didn't do any finish work on them, but I told people to paint the deck white if they were going to repaint just to keep the heat down, so if you ever saw white-decked H16s in Dallas you knew it was a boat I'd fixed. It's a little bit of effort but it's not huge. It doesn't take forever but you have to glue four times. I would do both hulls on a boat in a week, drop it off Saturday and pick it up the next Saturday.
  3. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    I don't know much about traditional proas. The best book I've read on the traditional boats was Gladwin's East Is A Big Bird, which is great on a couple of different levels. From what I understand if you went aback the rig fell down. I have no idea how a boat with a sinker ama would act in big weather, I just don't know. The reason I have a big, floaty ama with a lot of volume: My boat originally had a very small ama and very light beams. The ama was about 120 lbs volume total, the beams were 10' Laser topmast sections. This made for a very small boat. You could only sit on the main hull. If you sat out at all, even in a big breeze, you'd get dunked repeatedly, and the stress on the boat was huge. Once in a breeze I tried to sit over the ama and just keep the power cranked on and I got dunked to my waist three or four times in five minutes, I thought I was going to break the boat. So you had to sit in near the main hull, and the "boat" was the big hull, it was like sailing a canoe with a bench seat and a big arm out behind you: http://wikiproa.pbworks.com/f/messabout2003-7.jpg When I built the new 8.5' beams I also built a new ama: http://wikiproa.pbworks.com/f/ama on boat r.JPG It's about 650lb or 700lb of volume. Now you can sit wherever you want. It makes the boat feel huge. Now it's like a beach cat, you can sprawl on the tramp and not worry about sinking the ama. Two big guys can sit over the ama, it's fine. I think this is a reason even pretty small western proas have higher volume floaty amas. It makes the boat a lot bigger. If a 20' boat is as big as you want to drag around on a trailer, a sinker ama makes it feel like a little 20' canoe with one seat, it's tiny. A floaty ama makes it feel like a beach cat. The increased size is huge.
  4. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    I've never been super fond of the idea of waterstays, but ok, that would work. I don't know if most blue water proas have them, do they? My point was just that you should plan for going hard aback in a breeze, it's going to happen eventually. I haven't crossed any oceans in a proa but I've sailed a few thousand coastal miles in a 20'er. I've gone aback twice, once in a real breeze. You have to build the boat to survive that even if it only happens once. I'm not getting into adjudicating who's telling lies and who's not. This argument is twenty years old, it's not going to be settled here.
  5. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    If your beams are only designed for compression you're going to have a bad time the first time you go aback in a breeze, unless your rig just lets go in some way. Regarding the rest of the thread, Russell's boats were enormously inspiring to me when I first read about them. Rob's boats were enormously inspiring to me when I saw pictures of them on the internet. Both of them seem to me to be seriously original and well thought out. Rob was on the yahoo group proa_file years ago when I was first thinking about building a boat. I'd never done any more than patch a hole in my Hobie cat after getting t-boned or fix a soft deck, I had no idea what I was doing building a boat. He was enormously helpful, he wrote out long descriptions of how to do work, what to look out for, how to think about making a part strong enough and light enough. So the idea that all he does is show up and "destroy threads" seems quite off to me. I get that his self-promotion is offputting to some people. I skim over it, I've already read a lot about Harryproas
  6. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    How does that steering work? It looks like the aft mast is in the way of the tiller. Is it a push/pull stick on a yoke?
  7. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    No, it's a lot more than 8.5' wide. 11' or 12', I think.
  8. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    John Harris was nice enough to loan me one of his kayak/tri boats for the first Watertribe race, years ago. I helped them put Mbuli together on the beach and watched it smoke off under bare "poles" (about 80 sq ft of wingmast, as I recall) at about ten knots across Tampa Bay. I thought at the time that the only weakness I could see in the boat was the need to assemble it on the beach, which for a trailer boat is a huge pain in the ass, and the rudders. For a shallow water cruising boat, fixed daggerboard rudders like that just don't strike me as a good idea. So they sailed across Tampa Bay, hit a shallow and broke a rudder, switched rudders so the working one was aft, sailed off, hit another shallow and broke the other rudder, beached it and went and had dinner. I was still enormously impressed with the boat, I just thought it needed some kind of side-hull mounted kick up rudder if it was going to sail around in shallow water like that.
  9. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    Thanks! I've enjoyed fiddling with it. Laurent had a similar setup on his boat, but he used two Moth rigs, and he had two daggerboards instead of a leeboard.
  10. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    My boat is in the garage right now, but here's a couple of short videos: Sorry about the music on the first one, the mic noise was terrible
  11. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    I like the separate sheets. I sheet in the front sail first and the boat is really well balanced, then sheet in the aft sail as you start to move and the rudder bites. It has a 5' leeboard that dominates the CLR if it's down, and in that case the CLR is right in the middle of the boat and you can sheet in both at the same time, but if you're just reaching around with the board up the CLR is way forward when you start to move and you really need to sheet in the front sail first. In a lot of wind with the board up if you just pull in both sheets the boat has a lot of weather helm and will head up really aggressively. It's kind of like a Hobie 16, where you have to sheet in the jib first to get the boat moving, then bring on the main as the rudder bites. In the latest iteration I had all four sheets running to cam cleats in the middle of the boat so you could grab both sheets at once and pull if you wanted to, or just pull on one.
  12. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    It was interesting I was on the yahoo proa list with Gary Dierking years ago, when he was first developing it. I built a smaller one: http://wikiproa.pbworks.com/f/oldproa7.jpg It worked fine, but I never sailed it in over twelve knots or so. The shape was not great due to it being cut from an old jib, but aside from that I really liked it. So when winter set in I decided to go full-on idiot and make a big one: http://wikiproa.pbworks.com/f/messabout2003-5.jpg The spar is two carbon windsurfer masts joined butt to butt. The sail is some kind of laminate I got on sale, very stiff but a pain in the ass to try to sew. I put a big pocket on the luff and had a 6:1 line inside the pocket to prebend the spar. It was unbeatable in light air. The boat had very little wetted surface, the sail was super powerful, in 5 mph it was awesome. I once sailed right past a fleet of Lasers on a windward leg, I was laying on my tramp and just blew by them pointing higher and going faster. Very amusing. In 5-10 it was a handful. You could do it, but it was a handful. Over 10 knots of wind and it was homicidal. It was a menace. A powered up 180 sq ft sail swinging around over your head in 15 knots of wind is really quite something. It had a lot of power, there was no "off" switch, and shunting it was a freakin' menace. Once on a big lake the wind picked up and I sailed ten miles across the lake, beached, shunted the sail on the beach, and sailed ten miles back rather than shunt it in the water in a lot of wind. None of which, by the way, is a criticism of Gary's designs. His boats work fine, I've been told by both him and other people who have sailed them. I just took it a bit far In particular the large prebend in the spar seemed like a good idea, but it meant that the shunting lines on each end of the spar acted kind of like sheets. The pulled the end of the yard down, but they also pulled the boom down some since the prebend put them 18" behind the axis of rotation. All of which meant that the sail was never depowered. It was pulling like mad the whole time you were shunting. On my original sail I had far less prebend and far less problem shunting the boat. In the end I switched to a schooner: http://wikiproa.pbworks.com/f/1213849692/proa on beach after T200.jpg Which suits the boat so well I'd never consider going back to anything else. Easy to control, easy to shunt, easy to reef, totally under control even in a lot of wind. We took the boat on two Texas 200 cruises ten years ago and saw 30 knots of wind more than once, and it was fine. It was fun! It's now a great boat in a lot of wind, it's easier to shunt that boat than it is to tack a Hobie 16 in a lot of wind. Anyway, there you go, that's more than you ever wanted to know about a weirdo little boat in Texas.
  13. KONeill

    70' Cruising Proa....Big Red Yacht

    I've accidentally tacked a few times on my little 21' proa. When it had a Gibbons rig up the rig fell down, which was more or less the plan, and I paddled the boat in. With the schooner rig I just sailed it back around, not a big deal.
  14. KONeill

    Proa 21

    Are you thinking about building one? Where in Texas are you?
  15. KONeill

    NEW ROTATING MAST STEP

    Sorry, don't see an edit button. The studs going through the mast base are stainless, of course, not aluminum.