Kris Cringle

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About Kris Cringle

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  1. Kris Cringle

    SAILBOAT 35' 1983 CHEOY LEE (PERRY) 35

    I don't know about the compatability , Bull. But I would do it!
  2. Kris Cringle

    SAILBOAT 35' 1983 CHEOY LEE (PERRY) 35

    I've been using Petit Easypoxy. It's easy to apply so I coat the topsides about every 4 seasons. That's a very nice boat you've bought.
  3. Kris Cringle

    SAILBOAT 35' 1983 CHEOY LEE (PERRY) 35

    I've been following this thread and was especially waiting to see the shrink wrap removed. My suspicions were confirmed. The first year we owned our present boat, I stored a very reputable yard in Camden Maine. I had it shrink wrapped. We all (yard, me) knew the boat was Awlgripped but didn't consider how it would be shrink wrapped. They wrapped it right down to the water line, which they told me they did to all boats (this was the year 2000, and they applied awlgrip there, then). In the spring when I cut the shrinkwrap off, and water spilled out- that was trapped inside - it was quite a sight. Pox, all over. They didn't do a thing for me and I didn't push it (in hindsight, I should have). Suffice to say, after 18 years of owning this boat and doing projects of all kinds, the one that REALLY still sticks out in my memory, was removing that bubbled Awlgrip. I was nearly 20 years younger then, and I ache looking at this photo. Needless to say, I'm a fan of one part paint. I always worry down the road, knowing that every coating - no matter what it is - will one day, have to come off.
  4. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    I thought about doing that, but I'm afraid more rot is in the 'sill' piece. And it's not well bedded (note the gap). Considering the time to fit a couple pieces - maybe more, - would be more time than sawing off the through bolts (or turn from below,...if feasible) and mounting a new sill. Plus I'm launching next week, tools stay onshore. I'd rather sail than fettle. So I need a temporary patch of something in a can, until I get around to doing the above. Probably just epoxy and filler? Minwax miracle 'new wood' in a can? What ever it is, I'll paint a faux wood grain over it.
  5. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Something you rarely find under sound varnish, rot. I wasn't surprised, the varnish was never sound on the forward edge, under the overhanging trim piece above. This build on the stern of my boat is hard to maintain. I never gave it much thought until the scraper disappeared into it. Ha! But it was just as well. The black hole revealed that the lower piece (that has the rot) is the one bolted through the hull to deck flange(see the FH SS bolt). Sort of a "sill" that the upper piece, that matches and connects at toe rail height, is simply screwed to. Always the optimist(you have to be with an old boat), I could see the sandwich would be 'pretty' easily dismantled (cut the bolts off from here) and the top pieces salvaged, the lower 'sill' cut and replaced, and re-bolted-bedded. It's obviously been a leaker, but a fiberglass flange, doesn't care. I'm thinking of person to spend some quality time, in the lazaretto. Didn't hold me up. Yesterday I sanded and filler stained the starboard toe rail and this stern rail in 25 knot gusts(had to weight my stain pail to stay ondeck). Today it will get at least one coat of sealer, and I'm home free. Meanwhile the cleaned out rot hole is drying out, more or less. The only thing left is to choose a can of something, miracle rot eliminator, at the hardware store, to stuff into the holes. Any suggestions?
  6. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    That was all he seemed to know as he recalled the proa history. It was built of two diagonal layers of wood strips and then clothed. It was pretty well built for a home built boat. He put a high tech North main on it last season.
  7. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    That is a beautiful boat, Ed. What is the design?
  8. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Nice work! A relief to see the seal going on the wood. I finished stripping and then scraped the second toe rail. I like the carbide pull scrapers for this. They cut fast and smoothly. Not much work to take the last of the varnish off and get down to clean wood. The staging makes it easy on me. One last thing I did: A toe rail gets a lot of abuse. It slowly gets low spots and divots in the original lines. Maybe I can only see them,...but I take a long joiner plane to them. Probably not for purists. I set a shallow plane blade and follow the original top bevel (that is parallel with the deck), and start walking it for stem to stern. A sharp joiner plane is a lovely tool to work. It begins knocking off just the high spots. "chic, chic, chic", it goes along leaving a dotted line along the rail top. Next pass leaves a dashed line; then soon - a smooth ribbon comes off. You've got the flat top again. How much? More than a 1/16th, less than an 1/8". I figure after 50 years, the rails can take that tiny lowering to get the shape back. Then I start forming the original profile with the long plane, and finish up with a block plane. The danger is to keep going. Planes are addicting. I take the minimum, just until I see the blades making a continuous, flat line. Sand paper will finish the profile without continued dipping and cupping, now that the top has been shot flat and true. Speaking of sanding, I haven't touched a piece of sandpaper, yet. Toe rails, had enough?
  9. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Could be. Built in the 70's up in the St. Lawrence. John said working in the port ama, he realized this was built later(being overly familiar with the starboard ama,...) and the boat was launched as a Proa. She's fast, 40' long with the amenities of a 20' daysailer. He loves the boat and lavishes it with new sails, and just sails it. He took the saildrive out a few years ago and built really nice piece to bolt an outboard. Not as manueverable but he can raise the outboard so the boat really flies.
  10. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    People will say I'm crazy but I love removing old varnish. The thicker it is, the easier the lifting. I don't use much pressure on the putty knife. As the coating heats and begins to bubble, the knife begins to slide along the wood. Once you have the knack and timing, 20-30 coats of old varnish comes off in long ribbons.
  11. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Working outside on a boat is a real challenge. I've learned a lot about patience from the boatyard. When work is backed up in the spring, much of it is moved outside. Freshly sanded topsides and brightwork houses (several floating at the docks) may sit for days,...waiting for weather. No harm done to the freshly sanded areas by a few showers (might even help). Then the right weather and conditions comes along and presto, they're coated. I've learned to wait as the results I get applying coatings in marginal conditions, doubles the amount of work. But I had a toe rail sanded then it rained. Had to block sand it again as the raw wood gets watermarks,...Times like that are frustrating. I'm relieved once I get a couple coats of sealer on raw wood. Tree pollen and bugs, and dust from the gravel landing. Car traffic is high in spring. I usually try to coat in the mornings before the wind pipes up, but you take what you can get.
  12. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Just one part enamel on both the topsides and deck. I use a layer of blue tape with the heat gun. I think it works well as a heat barrier but I keep the gun on medium setting. Hold for a few seconds until I see the varnish bubble, and begin pushing a 2" stiff putty knife as I move the gun. The biggest problem is I'm usually caring for coatings that are out of synch with each other. Meaning, I painted the topsides last season, the deck a few back. This leaves a bit of ragged edge in places. When I begin laying the full strength varnish on, I'll overlap the paint with the varnish, just a bit, by taping into the paint. I'm looking for a water seal and this looks fine to my eyes. That is the crank to raise the bronze centerboard. I read Beiser's book review of the Challenger before purchasing this boat. What always stuck about that review was his point that this boat was very ample in all porportions, very few tight compromises on deck or below. A cup filled to the brim so to speak.
  13. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    I use a stiff putty knife and heat gun to remove the varnish. I let the heat do the work and push the gun and knife together. Then I use carbide pull scrapers to remove the last bits of varnish. Then I sand with 80 grit in a hard block that is easy to change pieces of paper (I change it often). Then I apply a filler stain, let dry. A coat of penetrating sealer, let dry, and rub with a 3M pad. One more coat of penetrating sealer. The port side is all ready for varnish. I'll sand first with 220 or maybe 320 if the sealer is pretty flat. Today, I spent 6 hours on the starboard rail with a heat gun and putty knife. I was within 3' of the end. These toe rails are big structural parts of this boat. Beefy and elegantly fitted. They start small, at the stern, and vertical to the deck, then slowly bevel out as they follow the angle of the topsides as the approach stem. At the stem they stand 4 -5 " high and bevel about 30 degrees to match the angle of the topsides. Through bolted on 8" centers, no way I would want to replace these. I don't know where the Stonehorse name comes from. They are popular up here.
  14. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Yes it is. Great boat for this coast.