Kris Cringle

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About Kris Cringle

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  1. Kris Cringle

    Wood Stove

    That is an amazing wood stove, Nat. 10" in dia., only needing 6" clearance, it's a candidate for a boat for sure. I wish I could see more details like interior of a the firebox, thickness of materials, etc. If you needed a constant heat source on a boat, that's a solid fuel that could work. Any idea what the price is? I didn't see a listing on the site except for chimney parts. NEVERMIND, I found the $. Whoa,...
  2. Kris Cringle

    Wood Stove

    Your boat is beautiful, Ed. That's about the best location of a radiant heater in a boat I've seen. Is there any chance the draft problem is a negative pressure problem of more air leaving the cabin (through companionway or vents) than fresh air is coming in? Our wood burner can suffer back drafts in a gust of wind if that negative pressure over takes the cabin.
  3. Kris Cringle

    Wood Stove

    Not too long, maybe a half an hour. I fiddle with it more often than I'd have to, because I like to keep a steady flame going.
  4. Kris Cringle

    Wood Stove

  5. Kris Cringle

    Wood Stove

    We use dried (very dry), hardwood, typical splits for a fireplace or wood stove. Because we use so little on the boat, I only grab the best, pieces clean ash, oak, birch. I used to cut the splits to length on a chop saw but had a nasty lock-up that nearly crushed one of my fingers(still feels a bit numb years later,...). That's a bad idea as the non-uniform wood can rock and bind. Now I use a band saw which is much safer if a little slower. Our firebox is about the size of a sandwich loaf of bread stood on end. The 20" or so splits need to be cut three times to be a handy size for putting in the firebox. One arm load of splits cut up is more than enough for several evenings of use so it's no chore. Ours is not a stove that you damp down. It does have a damper built into the SS smoke pipe but the problem is the temperature of the flue. Draft suffers if the pipe cools too much (which it does quickly above deck). Back drafts can easily occur when the pipe is cooled. Because of the above, I pack a bag of firewood (stored in a hanging locker), with lots of kindling. Cut offs of pine scraps (from my shop) as great as is birch bark. This makes it easier to keep a medium to hot fire going. I've learned to stuff a piece of paper up the stack and touch it off to warm the pipe, before lighting the fire. Burning wood on a boat isn't for everybody, as it isn't at home.
  6. Kris Cringle

    Wood Stove

    I saw this soap stone stove/fireplace on a Nielsen boat. I don't know if it was a one off but the a very good stove could be designed and built by a metal shop. The Simpson Lawrence stoves from the 50's and 60's are simple castings. A firebox with a heavy front, cast in one piece. The 1/2" thick front plate (behind the tile), was drilled and tapped for SS trim which holds the tiles (often cracked after years). This one is on an Aldlen Caravelle. Another Simpson Lawrence casting on a Hinckley B40. The key, and trick, is getting the stove low in the boat, which was achieved with all these stoves.
  7. Kris Cringle

    Wood Stove

    If you plan to burn it intermittently, and you've enjoyed (and operated) solid fuel burners on shore, I think you'll enjoy it. Soot: You'll get a bit of ash flecks mostly around the smoke pipe. I've never found it a problem and don't even wash it off. You can see our flue smoking here, in the early morning. If you look closely, you'll see the flecks of ash on the house. I think this is mostly the paper we use to kindle the stove. I've never seen any problem beyond the immediate area of the flue, but again, our use is intermittent and we don't live aboard in cold weather. On marinas, hard to say. We've burned it at the dock before but you have to figure how your orientation to the wind will affect the direction of the flue exhaust. For instance, I wouldn't want to use it if the wind is blowing right toward your mainsail, or down the companionway of your neighbor, of course. At anchor, the exhaust travels straight aft. No stains of soot on sail covers. There are air pressures to contend with that affect draft that are easier to manage with fore and aft air flow, but that's another thread. Insurance company has never said anything to us, even though their demanded survey every 5-7 years describes our Simpson Lawrence solid fuel burner. What a joke, insurance surveys. You sound like a romantic and would gladly put up with the few drawbacks of a cheery, crackling little fire below. Life is short, get your matches out.
  8. Kris Cringle

    Our Daily Bread...

    Some great looking bread in this thread. You can't get much taste out of a baguette, at least the ones I bake. White flour, no starter. But it's not what I think of as wholesome or even that good for you. But the task is alluring. I always knead the dough by hand because that's kind of rewarding in itself. You get so you know when the dough is right, by feel. The things I could better be creative with was the look of the formed loaves and razor blade slits, and the crust. The crust is 95% of my baguettes, get that right and you can't miss. But that's tricky. There is only a few minutes between perfect crust and burned crust, at least with my oven. Starting with a really hot preheated oven at 500F (and a red hot pan in the bottom that I pour boiling water into), the loaves go in and I run them for about 10 minutes and then turn the oven down to 450F. But I don't want to lessen the heat much as after 20 minutes, but usually not more than 25 minutes, it's just right. I just smell a slight burning when I know the crust is perfect. Much beyond that and they're overcooked. A trick I've used at home and on the boat if you're not getting the crackly crust you want (probably more important on baguettes), is to 'turtle' the loaves(turn them over) quickly in the pan, for the last 5 minutes of baking. That really helped on the boat in the cooler oven to get the crust browned. I use pans with water, a sprayer etc, crust isn't easy for me.
  9. Kris Cringle

    Our Daily Bread...

    I suppose proofing the yeast means making sure it activates. I dissolve the yeast (Fleishmens regular yeast from a jar) in a cup of warm water with a pinch of any sugar, and let it sit for 10 minutes or so. It'll start to foam and move a bit once it activates. I use All purpose, usually King Arthur. Bread flour is finer I think. I'm usually working around 50% water to my flour. I keep flour on the boat in a basic plastic tub with a plastic lid, in fact I buy the containers at my building supply, I think they're designed for paint. Seems to last indefinitely.
  10. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    I still admire PIERA, the 1955 Rhodes, even with it's 'Rumble seat'. Low freeboard, you have a panoramic view from below, of sunrises and sets, decks awash underway. Rumor has it the owner that had her re-built over last winter (keel/backbone, ribs, floors, etc), intends to donate her. Stand ready with checkbook, if you want her,... Conversely, the 75' Hinckley NORTH STAR looks less sleek to my eye. The proportion of higher freeboard for volume below shows. Still a pretty boat. I'm mostly looking down on the decks of these old yachts. With the Hinckley, I had to raise the SLR above my eye and shoot. Interesting layout. Many more butterfly hatches than you'd expect on a 1993 design(note the little wooden cleats on the corners-for canvas covers?). I bet the butterfly hatches make for a nice feel below as that is your only view - up. Plus more than ample cowl vents on Dorade boxes for ventilation. This boat is meant for sailing.
  11. Kris Cringle

    Our Daily Bread...

    Baguettes, now I'm in. I started baking baguettes shortly after visiting Paris (Poilane!), 15 or so years ago. It was the only bread I baked. Simple recipe, I just kept doing it, over and over and over. Kids were growing up and always loved fresh hot baguettes right out of the oven. Easy: Yeast, flour, salt, water, hands, time - about 6 hours, mostly waiting on rising). My recipe gleaned from books and practice just went into my head. 2 rises in the mixing bowl, one on the baking pan, that was it. But it was the simplicity of the bread that hooked me. The simplest changes, known and unknown, meant no two batches were ever, ever alike. For 10 + years I'd bake baguettes about once a week. HEAT is a big factor. We have an old restaurant range with an oven big enough for a 2' baking sheet. Full throttle on the oven for at least 20 minutes was the minimum of a good crust. My recipe yields 6, 2 footers. I've done hundreds my family would attest. A hot baguette, a bowl of EV olive oil,... Sadly, the kids have flown so I don't do my baguettes as often. But we used to do a smaller version occasionally on the boat. I'd do them with my daughter. Our little boat oven is anemic in comparison so baking is slower and the crust isn't the same but it was fresh bread, nobody cared.
  12. Kris Cringle

    The Zombie Fleet

    Is this what's for dinner? No, it's the propeller on my sons $1 dollar sailboat. I'm afraid this 50 year old, tired 26' fiberglass sailboat is in fact, a Zombie walking. I ran the gas out of the outboard at the dock. That's the extent of our 'winterizing' the last 3 seasons. I know, I know, it's abuse. But this is a hard sailboat to love. Plus we're busy, he living and working in Boston, me working. The last owner of about 15 years, didn't do much else for it. After buying a bigger boat, he found out quickly, this boat wouldn't sell. Soon he was looking at a liability. That's when I offered him a dollar for it. We were both happy. Despite the lack of maintenance and care, it was all intact, sails, rigging, engine, jack stands, sail away. I knew it was because he kept it right next to me for the last 15 years. We launched it and after about an hour of rigging it, he and my daughter were sailing on it. Brand isn't important (it's a 26' 1968+-, O'Day Outlaw). But it's not a design that is sought after in this area. Worse, as more old boats back up in the sales pipeline, too many options are out there for buyers with even a small budget, to buy an old, tired, glass boat. Further, a poor attribute of the boat is that it collects rain water by the bucketful through poorly designed/built, or both, drainage of the cockpit benches and locker lids. We've worked on that a bit but to no avail. I have a drastic idea we may have to apply, but will we? To bring this boat back, it only needs one step: It has to be completely disassembled - every bit and piece-outside and in, sanded and painted-every inch, and re-assembled. 50 year old parts and fastenings.... Are you excited yet? Then what would you have for all your work(500 hrs perhaps)? What else would it need? New sails, all running and standing rigging, engine,...then you would have something with value. With luck, maybe a value of 10% of your investment? For 3 seasons it has returned great value in sailing a ton of local kids all around Penobscot Bay. My son and I are in it together(I bought it,...), although he is paying the bills on it. A free boat isn't free, he's finding out. But the boats fate is writing on the wall. I know too much about old fiberglass boats. You're just around the corner from the next $1 boat in the growing supply of tired boats. Bigger, better, sought after when in decent shape. He could be in a position to spend a few K in not many years. He can't NOT sail, so he's in for it,... I'm pretty sure I'm going to get stuck with a Zombie in a few more years. My son could contest ownership, he's nobody's fool.
  13. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Locally where several race, this class is called the Foxeye. Recognizable as the H 12 1/2 when it has a gaff rig, the marconi rigged boats are referred to as Bullseyes in some areas, and the Foxeye here. It's a 1914 Nathaniel Herreshoff design. http://northhavencasino.org/fleet.php?5
  14. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    I did not but the boat is moored nearby (off North Haven Island village, Penobscot Bay). Nice condition.
  15. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Columbia 50. Still pretty after 50 years.