Kris Cringle

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About Kris Cringle

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  1. Kris Cringle

    Hard dinghy oars & oarlocks - what works best?

    A guy that owns a 7'6" Nutshell Dinghy borrowed my 9'6" Nutshell dinghy. He was floored by the two feet. The difference between a Dyer Midget and a Dyer Dhow will be the same. Night and day. You can't tip either 9'6" dingy over stepping anywhere into it, even sailing it would be hard. The Dyer Midget (or any 8' dink) is a great dinghy. Just don't overload it. When does that happen with smaller dinks? Sometimes after 1 person, it changes dramatically. The Dyer Dhow is a great little boat and would be a breeze with the load above. Both are good and are hard to find.
  2. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    This is on the Fox Island Thoroughfare, eastern half. We're anchored between Waterman Cove and Kent Cove, off North Haven Island. We enter between Fish Pt. Ledge and Kent Ledge on the chart. It's a little open but in even moderate anything-Southerly, it's comfortable. I've never seen anyone anchored there. Skylands. The gardeners bill for some of these places is more than the yard bill for their yachts.
  3. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    It will be tough on some but we'll survive. My take from living on this stretch of Maine coastline for 20 years: Fishing, isn't the big economic engine. More than just tourists, we draw people that spend money, big money, and that money isn't well tracked. Maine is hard to get to, period. We'll never have industry the likes of Southern New England, unless we move the state closer to the big metropolitan areas. No amount of stupid signs along I95 that say "Your business could be here,..." is ever going to change that. Maine, because of our remote location, has always been a cheap date. She's no Nantucket. But cheap dates have been pretty good, for me(and I'm not alone). Maine - a little rough around the edges perhaps, she is no phony. I've seen countless people that made it this far up the coast (most don't go above LL Bean,...), get that look in their eye, "I want to live here!" Then they look around at realestate and coming often from more expensive metro areas, their eyes light up. They fuel our huge big economic engine as they buy houses (some, 2, 3, even more), they buy boats, they buy businesses (some are still working), they set up businesses, they hire people like me (I've been adopted by one family that owns 4 houses in the area), they build, they maintain and maintain....Many of them love their life here because they realize, unlike Nantucket or Sag Harbor, this, Maine, is real. And a deal! And many of them also leave. Some try to make a go of a working life and find out, they don't have the tools, skills and parts, that fit in. But in the end, what the big engine does is this: They leave tons and tons and tons,... of their money,....behind!!! Case in point below: This wealthy philanthropist, not unusual in my area, invested in this old salt water farm. He married a local congress person and the big engine started up,...He built this state of the art organic farm that we can anchor off, use their beach (they leave it public, as they should). We picked up dinner at the farm stand. The farm supplies year round vegetables to the islanders (multiple green houses), employment for bright kids in agriculture, is a learning center for the islanders and visitors. It's beautiful and grounds are for the general public to enjoy. He also built a Hospice center in town, various houses, started businesses on the island and mainland, a big boat or two, and aaaaallll the maintenance and stuff, that goes along, he wrote the checks. He spent god only knows how much of his pile here, uncountable, but it must be a good chunk of a bil. Then a divorce happened ( big machine likes that just fine ), and well he's gone,...but the money isn't.
  4. Kris Cringle

    SAILBOAT 35' 1983 CHEOY LEE (PERRY) 35

    That article would be for Good Old Boat(they're interested in it). I write for fun so I'm not too prolific these days.
  5. Kris Cringle

    Hard dinghy oars & oarlocks - what works best?

    The typical bronze oarlocks wear quickly. But we use them for years like that. Seems you develop a wrist angle and tempo that keeps them fairly silent. There's a lot that goes on when you regularly row a boat that you may not be aware of. You'll quickly notice the difference when somebody else rows as you ride. It's a joy to watch and listen a solo rower gently pulling in a typical morning calm. It's evident they're enjoying the rhythmic sensation as they pause and glide between strokes. This was in Pulpit Harbor last weekend.
  6. Kris Cringle

    SAILBOAT 35' 1983 CHEOY LEE (PERRY) 35

    Wow! Impressive. What are your plans for the topside paint bubbling? I plan to do a One Part vs Two Part article and am searching for removal of two part paints. Seems we'll soon enter that era with quite a few boats.
  7. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    They are. The Cod story is well known as it was the fish that built a country. What gets lost is all the other groundfish that went by the same nets. I can't catch a Haddock in Penobscot Bay for dinner which was unheard of before they were fished out. Truth is, we don't even drop a line off the boat above Cape Cod except for Mackerel fishing with kids. Good thing our kids are grown up because it sounds like that's gone too. It's a great joy to watch kids catch fish. The book on this subject that has local attention (mine, which started this thread) today, is this: The Last Lobster https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250080851 I've been in touch with the author. He will do a reading for us at a new and used bookstore in town next time he's in Maine. A timely local subject.
  8. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    I'm sailing down to Mystic Seaport for the Alden event that goes on the weekend before. I doubt I'll be back in time. Good luck in the races. Are you doing all of them?
  9. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    Right! The other confusing thing about Maine lobster $$: The demand goes up seasonally, tourist season fills seaside restaurants. Tourist season coincides with the timing of when most lobsters shed their old undersized shell and grow new shells. That event is largely caused by water temperature. Shedding season is when the lobsters are the hungriest and inshore where they're easy to trap. "New Shells" sell for less $ because although the new shell is large, the lobster inside is still small. Much of the weight is in water that fills the oversized shell. Tourists love them thinking they're a deal. They get soaking wet eating them. Hard shells mean the lobster inside is tightly packed, little water. There is about 25% more lobster meat in a 1 1/4 lb hardshell vs a 1 1/4lb New Shell. Just a few seasons ago, the water warmed up very fast - and early. That caused the lobsters to move quickly inshore, shed their shells and flood the market, early. But: There was low demand before summer season. Price plummeted. Talk about a complicated fishery.
  10. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    Less than 10 years ago, I talked to this Scottish lobsterman in St Andrews. I spent a lot of time in the harbor shooting the boats and people. Smaller boats, smaller traps, smaller number of traps,... You get it. They are regulated as I recall but what I remember the most was that his boat price for lobster was running 3 to 4 times that of the Maine price, at the time. I know this guy in our harbor, a little. He's like many, on a shoe string budget. Nice guy. His wife drives into the harbor to pick him up (he probably lost his license for life, DUI). He can afford a Maine vanity plate on his PU truck. It says,. LaGirl. But many Maine lobstermen are sharp and make some big bucks. This guy was in Stonington selling his catch.Fit, picked up, he works hard. Does he understand the situation? I dunno. Last time we were on the Cape, we moored inside in Menemsha. I watched these lobstermen come in. Matching, graphic designed T shirts. Boat was sparkling, real exhaust not the dry stack of Maine boats. They were unloading their catch right to one of the fishmongers at Menemsha. Smart. No middle man. They can both make some money on lobster. Meanwhile in Maine, a 1/2 billion dollar industry, and the fisherman usually gets less than 4 bucks a pound. Not too smart. They don't know how to organize, or perhaps they're too big and can't, I dunno. It's a wonder they don't die in their dinghys.
  11. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    We were in Tenants Harbor last week having a B-day dinner for a nephew. He fishes so we picked up a mackerel jig for him and he headed down the docks at Luke's Lobster. We saw the fin activity on the water. A kid can't miss with mackeral in our harbors now. He came back empty handed. At first I re-figured the above, maybe a kid raised in Brooklyn CAN miss with mackerel. Then I overheard the manager, also the head of the fishing co-op there say, "Those are pogees". She went on,"They fished the mackerel out". Cheeziss. I couldn't believe that knowing the stocks that come into the harbor this time of year. They're about the only fish left for recreational fishing by the masses. I hope it isn't true. I haven't looked in the buckets down in our harbor. People of all makes and ways of life pull mackerel out of our harbor through July and August. They fish to eat them. I just stumbled on this: https://www.pressherald.com/2018/02/26/atlantic-mackerel-fishery-will-be-restricted-for-rest-of-year/
  12. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    We sailed out of Booth Bay for a couple years. I didn't know about Coloumbe. That's embarrassing! I've seen a lot of change in my area in just 20 years. Fewer families, more homes are now second homes and retirees are a huge part of the population in Rockport. Not long before we moved here, many fishing families lived right in the village/harbor neighborhood. The fishermen are still here in the harbor, in fact there's been an increase in fishing activity on the landing, but they commute from outside. Many sold their village homes for prices they couldn't refuse. Some were torn down for new homes. What will happen? Beats me,... We're (Maine) too remote to ever draw biz and industry that could provide a decent living for most. Housing costs have doubled, maybe twice since I've moved here. We will probably be the last family to raise kids in this house or neighborhood. I've seen more year round homes go to seasonal owners. Many year rounders here are retirees. I was lucky, my design/building skills supplied all the work I needed (and still do). Many people in more normal occupations end up going broke here. Maine is tricky! It's a painfully beautiful place to live and raise kids. It's future is not certain.
  13. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    Kenny, (not his real name) delivered those lobsters above, last week. He charges us more than his boat price, but less than local retail. We both make out (he's a good guy to know). He takes cash only of course, and we give him a tip. He regaled our guests his Maine accent. Somebody asked him about fishing stocks and he spouted more bullshit than you could believe. "There's plenty of shrimp out there" They closed the fishery last season. It's been limited to a week or two only, due to limited stocks. "There's plenty of Haddock out in the bay",...More bullshit. There is so little left of groundfish stocks that very little can be bought locally. And Kenny is a total climate science denier so he's not concerned about the lack of breeding stock in the Gulf, now being noticed by scientists. Kenny a Science denier. Unfortunately, I think he represents the majority of lobstermen.
  14. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    There are small glimmers of hope in the industry. A few groups of local fishermen are joining co-ops that practice more sustainable practices (for all species). If the product stays close to home through the sale, the fishermen can get more money. But unfortunately the bulk of the industry is working for big businesses that control the industry and boat (fisherman's) price. I fear it's way too late to prevent a collapse. That's not a big deal for most of us but I'm thinking beyond me and the changes the coast will see in the not too distant future. It's a way of life for so many Mainers.
  15. Kris Cringle

    The changing coast of Maine?

    Thousands of miles of unforgiving granite shoreline aside, nothing has formed the coast of Maine more than fishing. The fish are gone, mostly due to overfishing. What remains is a lucrative catch: the Maine lobster. Fishermen have broken the landing record each season for the last 5 years. Everybody agrees, there's plenty of lobsters in the Gulf of Maine, today. Why the lobster glut? A few notions: Natural predators, like Cod, are gone. So many traps have become feeding stations. Farming vs fishing? FACT: The Gulf of Maine is one of the fastest warming bodies of water on the planet. Did the rapid rise in water temperature fuel the present boom? Besides the half billion industry, the glut has propelled fishermen to gear up. The coast of Maine has 3 million traps on the bottom today. Many young fishermen have invested (gone in debt) in bigger boats and gear to harvest the maximum trap limit(huge-600 traps or so). Bluebird, a small skiff pulling a few traps in Pulpit Harbor. One thing is for sure, fisheries science tells us the Gulf of Maine will warm too much to sustain a healthy lobster population. The lobsters will migrate North (as they have been from Southern NE) to cooler water temperatures. The question isn't if, it's when. Bluebird docking up at the local fisherman's floating support station. These - usually large, wholesale lobster operations, buy the lobsters from the fishermen and supply them with precious bait. They need so much bait, bait is an industrial biz. The crew of Bluebird doesn't need much, just a few bait bags and they're off again. 2017 landings ended the record streak. The value was down $100 mil. Not the end of the world as today, fishing is a half a billion industry on our coast. But it was a significant dip in the recent trend. The fishing industry sounded no alarms,... yet. Bluebird heads out to set a few more traps. Sustainability is a new word in the Maine fishing industry. Boat prices ($ per pound of lobster) remain low (under $4/lb) despite record catches.The whole industry is invested in continued record landings. Bluebird, may be the future when lobsters are scarce, and their value finally reflects the resource.