Kris Cringle

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About Kris Cringle

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  1. Kris Cringle

    New Hinckley 53

    I admit I haven't been following and didn't know FSS had any part in the build. And I mis-spoke on the production builders, agreed they're all done. I meant more semi custom sailboats. It doesn't make sense for Hinckley to build this boat when they can have it done this way. For people that want all custom boats these builders represent the ultimate candy shop. Get anything you want built, (relatively) quickly.
  2. Kris Cringle

    New Hinckley 53

    The owner of Brooklin BY is also a partner in Front Street Shipyard. They must work together fitting the project to the facility and time frame available? This custom build MO of using more than one builder is becoming more common in the area. You can have your hull built by at one builder, your deck built at another and the interior built at still another location. Pretty smart way to use several small and medium sized builders to produce a large custom yacht in a time frame that only a huge builder could do in the past. I think it is all possible now because of CAD software. Builders can work back and forth on the same plans, online. Sort of spells the end to production sailboat builders in Maine.
  3. Kris Cringle

    Show your boat not sailing

    Last weekend I spent the night on a mooring in nearby Rockland Harbor. It was cold as a West wind blew in from middle America. After the last ferry docked up for the night, you could have heard a pin splash in the big harbor. A concerned text came from home, 3 miles to the North. 'It's really cold! Are you staying warm enough?" I texted back, "I'm managing,..." The next morning sea smoke blew across the ports which required kindling another fire as a boat really cools down overnight. This wood burner takes a while to heat the cabin up but it seems worth the extra time and toil.
  4. Kris Cringle

    How many hours on your diesel marine engine?

    Yeah, it will never be quiet. I haven't even considered installing sound proofing in this old stick built interior. Seems that would be a disaster as well as nearly impossible. It's a sailboat,...
  5. Kris Cringle

    How many hours on your diesel marine engine?

    I'm not much of a fan of cars (hate them, mostly ) and can't remember hardly one car engine in my past. Ok, I remember a 2 cycl. SAAB engine and a V-4 I had in a Saab Sonnet years ago. But I remember all my boat diesels (I remember outboards but none with fondness). I didn't like them all but I never disliked them either. I like this one so much that I enjoy watching it run. I even like the sound:
  6. Kris Cringle

    How many hours on your diesel marine engine?

    This one really was a shame as it ran well. Typical hours would have amounted to 3400, maybe. These engines go in forklifts and run much longer before rebuilt. The symptoms were heavy black smoking, slow starting. The stern would become black and exhaust water blackened the hull at the exit. Had injectors rebuilt. Clue: I was always aware of a slight skip, or play when I would turn the crank over manually with a bar. I'd hear some play if I moved it backward a degree or so. With the old engine stripped of parts I was about to take it to the dump. On my truck I decided to see if I could loosen the nut on the crankshaft. It came off easily enough (I would find out later that should be torqued pretty tight). Here's the smoking gun that killed the engine: The timing gears should have been torqued tight. The wood ruff to the gear that runs the injection pump, over maybe 20 years, rocked back and forth until it had deformed the key way on the crankshaft. An engine engineer-expert said he suspected that it was caused by the 2nd heavy frame alternator, either in it's application or on a faulty installation. That's where I was getting the heavy smoke - and the clicking feel when I manually turned the crankshaft. The injection pump was mistimed, and injecting eradically. What a shame. It would have taken an entire tear down(I was told) by a shop to repair-replace the crankshaft. Worked out in the end.
  7. Kris Cringle

    How many hours on your diesel marine engine?

    Also, to the OP question, you'll likely find a majority of boats for sale with engines that are at least a couple decades old and many much older than that. I think this is the nature of most marine diesels. They are long lived. 20-30 years old is pretty irrelevant in the condition.
  8. Kris Cringle

    How many hours on your diesel marine engine?

    That's how I found a replacement engine for my boat over 10 years ago. Nissan designed a 4 cylinder diesel to power water pumps and generators back in the late 60's. Chrysler marinized the engine, and it's larger 6 cylinder version in the 70's for boats under Chrysler/Nissan. My boat had the 4 cylinder installed in 1974. Fast forward to the 1980's, Nissan de-marinized essentially the same block as an option their Nissan pick up trucks. The only change was to swap the fuel injection pump, a Bosch pump that had a governor (to less than 2800 rpm), for a Bosch pump that allowed higher RPM's (not outrageously high). Fast forward again to 2008, my 1974 Chrysler/Nissan dies an early death due to a poorly installed 2nd large frame alternator(not installed by me). What do I do? Repower, rebuild, perplexing for an old boat of limited $ value and me always on a budget. 5 miles from my house, I find a mechanic who in fact has an SD-22 in a 1984 Nissan PU truck. The story: Old lady in Cushing bought the PU new, drove it to Rockland a couple times a week for nearly 20 years. He (Nissan mechanic) serviced the truck. Truck body rusts out completely. He buys the hulk from the old lady with plans to use the engine which at that point had 70,000 road miles. He kept it for a few years, started it periodically, but the project to use the engine never came. Karma I guess. I believed his story (still do). He hooked up a battery, hit the glow plugs, and the diesel fired right up. Sounded strong to me. I wrote a check for 1K and he took it out of the hulk and put it in my truck. All I had to do was remove the injection pump, install my slower gov'ed injection pump (much easier than I expected), install the manifold, heat exchange, raw water pump, transmission. The best part was that with a man on a small crane, me in the cabin, I had the engine in place and on the beds in half a day. I'm no great mechanic! Compare that to starting with a new block install. Over a decade of use now, it starts in seconds even at freezing temps, uses about 1/4 a quart of oil between 100 hour changes. My 1K investment hanging. Oh, so that's exactly how many hours I have on my diesel. 70,000 road miles plus 4 years in storage plus 11 seasons in a sailboat. Exactly.
  9. Kris Cringle

    Cruise Ships: blessing or curse?

    I was glad to read that Venice has banned cruise ships, at least the behemoths that roamed the canal. We love Venice but have only been there in the off season so haven't seen the onslaught of passengers. In fact I'd never go there in season, it's so private feeling a place without the crowds. I see medium sized cruise ships anchored off Rockland from my harbor a couple miles North. There is always local news about the problem, pro and con. Curiously, we are unaffected here. People, bulk tourists especially, are just like cows (no offense). They stay to certain marked trails and very few go beyond.
  10. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    A cool, handy, boat. A boat sailing into an anchorage catches my eye. But when the path in, is narrow - and dead to windward, this sight is a spectator sport for sailors. In my case, I know how many things could(and have,...), go wrong. BUFFLEHEAD is not the kind of boat you expect to see pulling off this feat. A Bud McIntosh (I think) designed gaffer. After sailing through the gateway to Perry Creek, she hardens up to windward headed down the narrowing creek into the stuffed mooring field. She pulls some sharp, fast tacks through the moored boats, with sure speed. Nimble sailboat. Shoaling is just off their starboard decks. On the final port tack just inside the channel, the crew wrung out another degree or two to windward by sheeting in - bar tight. This final note, slowly, shook the last of the old boats way, ...nearly out..... The bow wave is disappearing. The Captain has his eye and mind on his target ahead. Sails finally luff, the captain appears at the stem and stabs the mooring pendant just as BUFFLEHEAD kisses the mooring ball. Dead center, perfect. The crew suddenly appears as well and has started dousing sails. What's their secret? Experience I suspect. Doing some searching, I found the boat is a local daysailing charter. And these old gaff rigged designs, self tending, originated to work under sail. They have some old tricks. A plus, the captain built the boat himself which must affect how you and the boat work together. Impressive to watch. The next morning looking back at BUFFLEHEAD (the nearest boat moored aft over dinghy), who would think the boat sailed into and up the narrow creek?
  11. Kris Cringle

    getting the dogs aboard

    Winner! That's the ideal size for a boat dog. Mine, with his handle attached (pfd) is about the weight of a 12 pack. Your AKC six pack is the preferred weight. You could carry all your provisions into the dinghy and lift it up onto your boats deck, all in one crate. But we all break the weight into smaller bags that are easier to hoist on deck an often heaving deck. You can't shrink a big dog but when people ask what is a good boat dog, I think size is #1. I downsized about 20 years ago for this very reason. Small dogs do have their 'things' but for sailing, size really makes a difference. Small dogs aren't great in the snow.
  12. Kris Cringle

    getting the dogs aboard

    Many sailors are over dogged.
  13. Kris Cringle

    Have Torqueedo Outboards Come of Age Yet

    I was curious, too. It 'drives' just like an outboard in that the throttle twists and it rotates the engine to turn the boat. At first I thought it was sort of jolting. But once I used a softer touch, the throttle is almost infinitely adjustable. Meaning you can rotate the prop at very slow rpm's. That was nice maneuvering the inflatable alongside a dock. Piece of cake. No thunking into reverse just a seamless twist from forward to reverse with lots of neutral between. You crack it open just like an outboard for full throttle and it holds. But that's the most water noise and a slight whir from the engine. But it was much more pleasant throttled back to enjoy a much quieter wake noise and ride. You stick the magnetic key into it's indent, push the ON switch and just twist (slowly-it has some thrust!) the throttle and go. Nothing to do except turn it off but I suspect, it just goes to sleep if you don't turn it OFF. No heat, no flushing (that I know of).
  14. Kris Cringle

    Coolboats to admire

    Wow, that Alden design (Bolero look alike - not), is really dated! I recognized the details, ports, stepped doghouse, house top radius, etc. Sure enough, it's Alden design # 948, from 1959. 1959 was a busy year and era for Alden Design of Boston Mass. The next design, # 949 is my boat, also 1959. The ports of course are a snap shot of Alden in 1959. And yes, as somebody mentioned, the light and view make this detail one of the best features of the boat. If I wanted to cross oceans, I'd get a much, much bigger boat, with no ports but for coastal sailing, give me light and a saloon with a view. BOLERO
  15. Kris Cringle

    Show your boat not sailing

    Not sailing, again, last weekend. We were anchored about 100 yards from a fishing float: "I've never seen more gear in the water, all the way from here to Castine", we overheard a young lobsterman holler. Figures, the season had a slowish start due to a cold spring. Only in the last few weeks has the catch begun to rise. With only a couple months left, they're throwing all their gear overboard. If having to make a season in a few weeks isn't stressful enough, there is a bait shortage. Herring, the preferred bait for lobsters, has been overfished and the season closed. We watched some guys scrape up the last of dozens of cardboard crates that likely held frozen bait. Exotic species of bait from afar are being marketed to supply the demand. We watched some enterprising guy set a gill net just off the bait dock. He must have corralled a huge school of Pogies as it took him nearly 2 hours to haul the catch - by hand - into his boat. He was also baby sitting his little boy, and it is Sunday. His catch per pound might rival boat prices for lobster?! This was good mews for a bald eagle that tried in vain to steal a mackerel from an Osprey overhead. The big eagles are too slow for 'real' fish. But the gill net left plenty of wounded Pogies drifting nearby. He snagged an easy one and headed off to a tree top from breakfast. Maine, about the most un-diverse state in the union is different on the water. Like agriculture some of the labor force is filled by migrant workers here for a season. Still, not everybody likes working on Sunday. But it's make or break time and stern men/women, are sought after. Hard work though,... There is a new generation at the wheel of the industry. Many of the new captains are mortgaged pretty heavily in their gear. They need the equipment to service their 800 trap limit. They need the 800 traps fished, to make payments that go on all winter. A bait shortage, a short season and a rapidly warming Gulf of Maine that is driving the American Lobster into Canadian waters. I loved this boat flying a carbon encrusted Stars and Stripes through Pulpit Harbor. I think that's a bottle of stress relief in the cup holder, soon to be uncorked. Without it, there would be a mutiny.