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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

oneguyfromdetroit

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About oneguyfromdetroit

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  • Birthday 10/08/1958

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  1. I had very similar issue with my Santana 35. Dropped keel, but left keel bolts thru hull, in position. Important to brave keel before doing this. Rebuilt mast step and all stringers from mast step to companionway. All it takes is time and materials. Those are great boats, and worth the fix.
  2. I run an old iphone4 that isn't on my phone plan. plus external battery. Put it all in a waterproof bag. turn on airplane mode then upload when you get back to the dock. If you put it on airplane mode, doesn't that turn off the GPS? My Android phones and tablets all receive GPS in airplane mode.
  3. #22 here. Looking forward to it, as always.
  4. Especially if it's red brass from the hardware store, and reputable marine chandleries shouldn't even sell gate valves. Brass is made of copper and zinc alloy, which when submerged in salt water becomes its' own battery. The zinc dissolves and the the valve body shears off the next time you try to open or close it. Yours are below the waterline, so that's the perfect recipe for sending your boat to the bottom. That's worst case scenario. "Seacocks" should have a 90 degree handle so you know at a glance if it's open or closed. Cockpit drains should be free flowing, without valves, at or slightly above waterline, with port scuppers draining to starboard, and vice versa so that no matter which tack you're on, the cockpit still drains. Nothing else should share the cockpit drains. Bilge pumps typically shouldn't drain below the waterline as it puts back pressure on the pump. Same goes with check valves on the pump discharge. If you have two bilge pumps, the high water pump should discharge above the highest heeled waterline. At, or below the waterline, they should have a vented loop. Through-hull fittings are cheaper than a salvage operation, and drilling holes in boats above the waterline is easy. Money well spent for a good nights sleep. Thanks. The good news is, this boat has spent it's entire life in fresh water. All the thru hulls have a handle that looks like a faucet spigot handle that turns to open or close. All the thru hulls except the ones used for cockpit drains, when closed, have the part, not sure what it's called, that, when closed, is flush with the hull. The two cockpit/blige ones have the handle, but not the part that is flush with the hull when closed. I'll try and get photos. Thanks. ...not good... Seriously? Boat is 38 years old. Never an issue. I realize thru hull design, like everything else, has evolved over the years, but these have never been an issue. Will try and get photos today.
  5. Especially if it's red brass from the hardware store, and reputable marine chandleries shouldn't even sell gate valves. Brass is made of copper and zinc alloy, which when submerged in salt water becomes its' own battery. The zinc dissolves and the the valve body shears off the next time you try to open or close it. Yours are below the waterline, so that's the perfect recipe for sending your boat to the bottom. That's worst case scenario. "Seacocks" should have a 90 degree handle so you know at a glance if it's open or closed. Cockpit drains should be free flowing, without valves, at or slightly above waterline, with port scuppers draining to starboard, and vice versa so that no matter which tack you're on, the cockpit still drains. Nothing else should share the cockpit drains. Bilge pumps typically shouldn't drain below the waterline as it puts back pressure on the pump. Same goes with check valves on the pump discharge. If you have two bilge pumps, the high water pump should discharge above the highest heeled waterline. At, or below the waterline, they should have a vented loop. Through-hull fittings are cheaper than a salvage operation, and drilling holes in boats above the waterline is easy. Money well spent for a good nights sleep. Thanks. The good news is, this boat has spent it's entire life in fresh water. All the thru hulls have a handle that looks like a faucet spigot handle that turns to open or close. All the thru hulls except the ones used for cockpit drains, when closed, have the part, not sure what it's called, that, when closed, is flush with the hull. The two cockpit/blige ones have the handle, but not the part that is flush with the hull when closed. I'll try and get photos. Thanks.
  6. Electric bilge pump is used rarely. Manual pumps have never been used. But, if needed, want them to work properly.
  7. Thanks.. Original setup had cockpit drains discharge thru one gate valve, manual bilge pumps thru a second gate valve, and the electric bilge pump was tied into cockpit drains. So no matter what I end up doing, will correct that. The galley sink is use for nothing other than dehumidifier discharged while docked. We use bottled, or filtered water to drink, and carry none in water tank. There are NO thru hulls above the waterline on this boat. The galley sink drain is closer to the waterline than the gate valves currently used.
  8. "Run the electric bilge pump, and the manual bilge pump that is down below, to the galley sink discharge, which also has a 1 1/2" ID connection." I do not think you want to do that. Try pouring a 5 gallon bucket of water into you galley sink. I think you will be surprised. The pumped water would fill your sink I am pretty sure unless you have a real weinie weak pump. Bilge pump should be thru hull above the waterline. YRMV That would not simulate reality; the sink it self does not have 1 1/2 inch drain. The bilge discharge (after the anti siphon loop), would go straight to the 1 1/2" thru hull, Sink drain would tap into this, via T fitting, above. As it is now, the electric bilge is joined to scupper drain (and has been, for 38 years), and the two manual bilge pumps are are joined to the other valve gate. Capacity is less (if any concern), than location of the galley sink thru hull, which is further outboard than the two gate valves, all of which are under the water line. Appreciate the discussion, keep the constructive thoughts coming.
  9. "unless combined system has sufficient capacity to handle maximum combined volume." That is from CYC Mac safety regs, Will check ISAF, but guessing it's similiar. Still doesn't answer question about moving to galley sink drain:)
  10. I'm in the process of recoring a spongy,wet cockpit sole. Cockpit does not open aft, and has 4 scupper drains. The drains lead to one of two gate valves that are below cockpit, and, below the waterline, The discharge for the electric bilge pump also was tied into the same drain the scuppers discharge to. There are also two manually operated bilge pumps, one in cockpit, and one down below. Both of those tie together and discharge into the second gate valve, also below cockpit and below waterline. Gate valve connection fits 1 1/2" ID hose. With the setup as described, had never had any issue with drainage capacity, but, the way it was set up, it looked like that 3 Stooges episode where they are trying to stop a leak by adding more pipe! In an effort to tidy things up a little bit, what I'm considering is this: Leave cockpit scuppers as they are, tied into one gate valve. Have the cockpit manual bilge pump continue to discharge into the second valve gate. Run the electric bilge pump, and the manual bilge pump that is down below, to the galley sink discharge, which also has a 1 1/2" ID connection. The sink drain is on the starboard side of the boat, below the water line. The sink is never used while racing, in fact the thru hull is usually shut. I open it up at the dock, as that's where the dehumidifier drains. On occasions when the sink has been open while sailing, I've never had water back up into the sink when heeled over. There is no restrictor of any type to limit water flowing up. Other than running an anti-siphon loop for the two additional discharges I'm considering, is there any thought that this is a bad idea? Thanks.
  11. Did my first Super Mac this year. Thoroughly enjoyed it. We thought a PH to CYC the following week would have been fun. Back to back Super Macs... I'd be happy with one a year, alternating starts between PH and CYC.
  12. Saildry is as in touch with the sailing scene as much as anyone, if not more. He is a highly sought after crew, and his customer service equals that of his dad. I think you're the one out of touch...
  13. Huge props to Torresen Marine. Had transmission blow up 9 miles north of N. Manitou island. Sailed 28 hours to Ludington. They sent a guy up to pick up me and the trans; had it rebuilt in about 5 hours. Outstanding work! Back on the water, 118 miles to CYC. Thank you Torresen Marine!
  14. The spread in performance/boatspeed among Super Mac boats entered is wild, from an ORMA 60 & Volvo 70 to a "30 footer" and wide variety in between. Seems unlikely many of the boats will even see each other after Mackinac Island (or earlier) other than on YB. Looks like a bucket list race though, I'm surprised only 31 boats entered, especially with the Bayview Mac starting the Sat after. I would have thought pretty much every boat entered in the CYC and BYC Macs would have also entered the Super Mac, but I guess the CYC Sailors Celebration is a big draw... Not really about the party... similar numbers to 2009's SuperMac 500 NM is just too much for most midwesterners to handle at one time! Honestly, I've gotten to the point where the "Mac Race season' is not complete, unless I do both of them. When I asked potential CHI MAC crew if they were interested in also doing Super Mac, 100% of them said yes. This is on top of the 560 mile delivery to Chicago, to start the race....
  15. The spread in performance/boatspeed among Super Mac boats entered is wild, from an ORMA 60 & Volvo 70 to a "30 footer" and wide variety in between. Seems unlikely many of the boats will even see each other after Mackinac Island (or earlier) other than on YB. Looks like a bucket list race though, I'm surprised only 31 boats entered, especially with the Bayview Mac starting the Sat after. I would have thought pretty much every boat entered in the CYC and BYC Macs would have also entered the Super Mac, but I guess the CYC Sailors Celebration is a big draw... Chicago/Lake Michigan based boats that are sub 50' don't seem to come over to Lake Huron for the BYC Mac very often The CYC Mac Sailor's Celebration on the island is what it is...I'll leave it at that. IMO the CYC Mac INCLUDING the Sailors Celebration is one of the highlights of the season, though I see people complain about it here every year (usually drink prices). But the Super Mac only comes around every 10 years of so, hence a bucket list item? And I assume the Bayview Mac after party/awards/celebration is equally enjoyable (never been)? You should go! It's a somewhat different party; live band, rum and beer flowing, a bit more raucous.