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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Laker

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About Laker

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  • Birthday 06/22/1951

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  1. "National Cleavage Day"

    Hello there young lady. Would you like to come for a ride on my sleek, ocean racing yacht?
  2. We are talking Gentlemen here, not Australians
  3. Good God! A bunch of experts on the Scottish Reformation.
  4. Don't for an instant think that the condition of the market is closely related to the economy. They are two different things.
  5. I first came across the concept of the stock market being an essentially zero sum game going back to 1760 from a graduate seminar at business school. The presenter made a really good case and given that the stock market is the most available instrument for the trade of rogue or dead capital, I am inclined to his view. Just think of the capital held in say, art collections or Vancouver real estate, you start to get the idea. I realize that there is a whole industry built on the buying and selling of stocks, but I think that a long look at their validity is required. I have seen too many stock brokers with model sheep on their desks. Yes, Buffett grew rich on picking the stocks whose growth was not attached to rogue capital, but that does not mean that there are not bubbles out there to drag the average down. All I have to show at the moment are a bunch of notes from that seminar, but will look for some graphs that can be published. Unfortunately the concept and proof of this is a book, not a forum entry.
  6. I remember a friend being really, really happy when his daughters found out about boys. The cost of horse regattas was getting to him. Well in excess of campaigning a 26' MORC boat.
  7. Gates et al were the exception that made the rule. They added to the wealth line of the world, not just traveled up and down it, which is the process of most investing. Yes, some people win, but nearly an equal number lose. That is the process of rogue or in Keynsian parlance, "dead" capital chasing its own tail. No wonder the term "capitalist"gets a bad name. The exception comes when there is that nugget of a good idea that is well managed that contributes to society. It is the pot of gold that all good professional investors are searching for. The number of articles on the stock market being held up by a sunny, positive approach to life no matter what the reality, are legion. The gambler's outlook. I think you will also find that once the business was in a mature phase, a cash cow in Boston Consulting parlance, that their factories were built with bonds. The cash was for "investing".
  8. And I will put it to you that it is bonds, not stocks, that do the heavy lifting in the financial markets.
  9. And I have some land in Florida........ Don't you remember the kerfuffle about the computers that bought stocks a millisecond before others based on the amount of latency in the prime computers? It still hasn't been truly answered. You call that efficient and fair? How about "pump and dump"? Yes, it still goes on, even with people looking for it. No, the stock market is merely the thrashing of rogue and dead capital with little overall benefit to humanity. (humanity is not the 1% who seem to have abiding influence and participation in the market)
  10. We Need Muzzles For The Christian Right

    However, Matthew 5: "Blessed are the gentle, the merciful, the peacemakers"
  11. We Need Muzzles For The Christian Right

    Violent Redemption at its worst. There was a great outcry against the concept when St. Anselm of Canterbury brought it forth and started the Crusades. I think we have to revisit its validity.
  12. Trickle down

    That good old lazy economist again. I thought from Fletcher onward that we know better.
  13. Tax “Reform”

    I"ve got to go with Raz"r here. In a large company, investments are made on a risk/reward basis with the cost of capital being a major input. The cash on hand is rarely an issue and if so, only inputs to the cost of capital.
  14. Tax “Reform”

    What are you talking about? Taxes pay for common goods. Roads provide jobs, goods and services for instance more efficiently than the private sector could do, for instance. I won't write the tome on why, just think why there aren't a lot of private freeways.