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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

Delta Blues

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  1. So, as the Indian Ocean is a "remote part" of the world, just when will a long range sailor, around the world sailor stumble across the debris field? There will be shit floating from this thing for a long time.
  2. In that case, make it 8 soles. Or 4 souls.
  3. I can't stand this. Here's how I see it in my humble opinion - My husband moronically drove his boat right into the side of an island. On board he had modern navigation equipment, he had the ability to read charts and see that this Island was there and that he was heading straight for it. He had decades of experience. He hit the panic button on the SPOT, the way he set the SPOT up was when the Panic button was hit, the responders were to call his/my house. But you know, it was in the middle of the night when my phone rang, I didn't bother to get it. So I let the opportunity pass to get involved in tracking down his whereabouts. But due to his own ineptitude, not only did he drive the boat right into the island, destroying the boat completely, he took 4 soles with it. It must be someone else's fault.
  4. The Irish candle!! The Lass was Walking down O'Connell Street in Dublin when she met up with Father Flaherty. The Father said, "Top o'the mornin' to ye! Aren't ye Mrs. Donovan and didn't I marry ye and yer husband 2 years ago?" She replied, "Aye, that ye did, Father." The Father asked, "And be there any wee ones yet?" She replied, "No, not yet, Father." The Father said, "Well now, I'm going to Rome next week and I'll light a candle for ye and yer husband." She replied, "Oh, thank ye, Father." They then parted ways. Some years later they met again. The Father asked, "Well now, Mrs. Donovan,how are ye these days?" She replied, "Oh, very well, Father!" The Father asked, "And tell me, have ye any wee ones yet?" She replied, "Oh yes, Father! Three sets of twins and 4 singles, 10 in all!" The Father said, "That's wonderful! How is yer loving husband doing?" She replied, "E's gone to Rome to blow out yer fookin candle."
  5. Has anyone followed a NTSB report on an airplane crash from beginning to end? They remain tight lipped all the way through. They do put out an interim report, and later a final report. And it takes at least a YEAR to get that far. Did you ever see the PBS video of the reconstruction of an aircraft that had a fire inside? By putting together everything, they traced it to some wires just above the door between the cabin and the flight deck. As I recall they had abraded. And how long do you think it took to gather the pieces, reassemble them in an inside hanger, and look find that one little spot? And you think that a couple of observational interviews are going to give you this type of conclusive evidence in Artemis? The America's Cup could be over by the time the report comes out on Artemis.
  6. I haven't gone through this thread, but would presume that the structural ribs etc. are probably there for show, not for go. By putting stays for the masts out to the corners of the hulls, when that thing starts flexing in seas, the tension on the wires will cause the mast to break through compression. I'd love to see that thing out in 20' seas with a good helicopter and a better video cam to catch it on.
  7. My wife said to me, "Honey, make love to me like they do in the movies." I flipped her over and stuck it in her butt, later on flipped her over and sprayed her in the face. That's when I found out we watch different movies.
  8. Here's the U.S. Sailing two paragraph report - http://media.ussailing.org/Latest_News/2012/USS_Newport_061212.htm They said that the boat ran into the island. Don't know how you can say it was bungled, seems to be right to the point.
  9. I've tried to imagine being on that boat in the last 5 minutes of its existance. I imagine at least 1-3 below in their bunks grabbing shut eye and one on deck tethered. Wind was minimal, seas had swells, not so much to be difficult. I imagine the autopilot steering (based on the satellite track). What was the one person on deck doing (if there were two I imagine the second one sleeping in the cockpit)? Was he jamming to some tunes? Was it cockpit speakers or an I-device? Was he reading a book with a book light? Sitting in the cockpit it appears that the dodger was up and with those vinyl windows that are never crystal clear. The GPS plotter had been set hours earlier for this doomed course. How was the driver maintaining a look out? Did he think if he didn't see anything lights through the vinyl window that he was good? Did he ever stand up and look over the top of the dodger to have a better view? I suspect that it was cool, long pants, long sleeve jackets, possibly glove and at least a peak cap. If damp, maybe some foulies on. No moon. Engine humming (they're so quiet in cars, why are they so loud in boats?). North Coronado Island is a wildlife refuge without any bays, where people are not allowed to go ashore. It is small, a half mile long with total of only .18 sq. mile. Its peak 500 feet above the water. At one point they were called the Desert Islands, snakes, rabbits, lizards, mice and birds. There is litle vegetation, sea dahlias, cactus, and wild cucumber. While many islands produce their own "odor" I try to imagine if these islands have an "odor." Small animal droppings don't seem to be a source. Did the driver fall asleep? Take a 15 ninute nap and set his alarm? The gentle rolling of the swells, little activity on the horizon, and then BOOM. The autopsies said that Rudolph had head and neck injuries, Stewart drowning with head injuries as a contributing factor, Mavromatis died from multiple injuries, and Johnson, died of multiple bodily injuries. How long did it take for them to die? Is 6 knots to zero knots in a snap of a second into a wall enough force for the injuries to have them succumb? Aren't car bumpers to hold up to a 5MPH hit? It was reported that the panic button on the Spot was pressed, it seems someone was still able to do things at the crash site. Was it the repeated hits into the wall? The boat must have stayed afloat for some time, pounding over and over again to cause the boat to be found broken up in a long debris field. It is amazing that things like this happen.
  10. Not true, according to the USCG. Is there some online database to check? What's the link?
  11. I would call a qualifier series leading up to a championship a "skills test" of sorts. Some international-scope events such as the Vendée Globe require similar "skills test"s. And which championship are you referring to that goes overnight, requires navigation skills, to plot a route and make sure the route is safe? Every championship I can think of is sailed in daylight hours, out the harbor and return to the same harbor on a day trip. Most major international solo races have qualifiers that do all that. Not sure you call them 'championships' but they certainly make you prove your skills. You're both seeking the needle in the haystack. The vast majority of races in the U.S. have no experience qualifiers. Almost all races are show up and go. What the heck, are the two of you trying to support DoRag?
  12. I would call a qualifier series leading up to a championship a "skills test" of sorts. Some international-scope events such as the Vendée Globe require similar "skills test"s. And which championship are you referring to that goes overnight, requires navigation skills, to plot a route and make sure the route is safe? Every championship I can think of is sailed in daylight hours, out the harbor and return to the same harbor on a day trip.
  13. I believe the boat was owned by the skipper, but made available to others for charter through Marina Sailing. So for the purposes of N2E 2012, it was not a charter but a private vessel operated by the owner. I don't think there's any indication that the crew were paying passengers. I agree that it's clear that the skipper and crew contributed to the accident. Question (for the lawyers) is who else with deeper pockets might have some theoretical liability, and preferably a willingness to settle rather than litigate. Given that the race has been run for many years and thousands (likely tens of thousands) of boats have navigated it safely it seems like it would be hard to prove gross negligence by any of the organizers. When you point to the history of the event, remember thatb is was restricted to boats that sailed to Ensenada. In other words, a hand on a tiller. As the race entries dwindled, NOSA sought to increase attendance by expanding the cruiser classes. Then added the NASBOAT option allowing the use of motors. That enticed a whole new set of folks, arguably less experienced, to eneter the race. As NOSA knowingly enticed novices to enter the race, what duty did they have to ensure they were aware of the hazards of racing at night in heavily used commercial shipping lanes, with dark islands, hazards off Rosarita Beach, etc. What did NOSA to ensure they were competent to participate? What training and cautions did NOSA promulgate? Everyone knows that it requires a license and passing certain tests in order to drive a car. No such requirements exits for driving a boat. NOSA understood taht and encouraged novices to go in harm's way. No, the officers and directors of NOSA are the deep pockets in this litigation and could be held accountable. Come to think of it: I don't know of any sailboat racing event in the U.S. that requires any "skills test." I'm not familiar with any USCG Regulation or State Regulation that requires any "skills test" or "licensing" (for adults) for operating a pleasure (non-commercial) sailboat. While the USCG and NASBLA would wish to grow their government bureaucracies with a suggestion like yours, The People have been fighting and resisting this government intrusion for decades. Do you have a dog in this fight? Membership in a bona fide yacht club used to help cover who could race in the past. In New Jersey now you need a boat class, test and annual license to operate anything on the water with a motor. A motoring test is highly different than a sailing test.
  14. I believe the boat was owned by the skipper, but made available to others for charter through Marina Sailing. So for the purposes of N2E 2012, it was not a charter but a private vessel operated by the owner. I don't think there's any indication that the crew were paying passengers. I agree that it's clear that the skipper and crew contributed to the accident. Question (for the lawyers) is who else with deeper pockets might have some theoretical liability, and preferably a willingness to settle rather than litigate. Given that the race has been run for many years and thousands (likely tens of thousands) of boats have navigated it safely it seems like it would be hard to prove gross negligence by any of the organizers. When you point to the history of the event, remember thatb is was restricted to boats that sailed to Ensenada. In other words, a hand on a tiller. As the race entries dwindled, NOSA sought to increase attendance by expanding the cruiser classes. Then added the NASBOAT option allowing the use of motors. That enticed a whole new set of folks, arguably less experienced, to eneter the race. As NOSA knowingly enticed novices to enter the race, what duty did they have to ensure they were aware of the hazards of racing at night in heavily used commercial shipping lanes, with dark islands, hazards off Rosarita Beach, etc. What did NOSA to ensure they were competent to participate? What training and cautions did NOSA promulgate? Everyone knows that it requires a license and passing certain tests in order to drive a car. No such requirements exits for driving a boat. NOSA understood taht and encouraged novices to go in harm's way. No, the officers and directors of NOSA are the deep pockets in this litigation and could be held accountable. Come to think of it: I don't know of any sailboat racing event in the U.S. that requires any "skills test." I'm not familiar with any USCG Regulation or State Regulation that requires any "skills test" or "licensing" (for adults) for operating a pleasure (non-commercial) sailboat. While the USCG and NASBLA would wish to grow their government bureaucracies with a suggestion like yours, The People have been fighting and resisting this government intrusion for decades. Do you have a dog in this fight?
  15. I did a Google search to see if the USCG lists Captains online. I could not find a search to do that. Newspaper reports say Theofanis Mavromatis held an USCG Captain License: http://www.dailynews.com/breakingnews/ci_20514734/daughter-lost-yacht-skipper-says-father-had-lifetime Additionally he had done N2E previously. If I recall the crew had done one too previously. They weren't "green" no matter how DoRag may want to put a spin on it.