racinginparadise

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123 F'n Saint

About racinginparadise

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  • Birthday 05/01/1961

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    BVI
  • Interests
    Vintage Trimaran racing
    Ultra light powercats

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  1. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    SPOT ON!!
  2. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    Blimey, it's not been 2 weeks and the thread nearly made it to page 2! Progress has been made but it's not been earth shattering. A spot of family sailing and the firecracker regatta justifiably got in the way! The late June tradewinds took out all the tarps so there goes a whole work day setting that lot up again. Today a solid mid week session saw the whole salon floor get its biax epoxy laminate it so deserved, the foredeck and the fwd beam also enjoyed the sensation of fresh cloth, liberally applied. We are leaning towards installing an engine. Saildrive or shaft drive? We have the option of both 'in hand' but can't decide. The saildrive is neat, it occupies less space...but ultimately the shaft drive is more robust with a smaller hole should it start leaking! Weight-wise there's not much in it, not enough to sway the call. With the whole salon floor now laminated and ready for stringers it's time to decide. I initially thought saildrive, I've worked with them for many years and have never seen a leg 'ripped out' with a fractured diaphragm. But then I like the simplicity of a shaft drive and dripless shaft seal. Damn, 'I used to be indecisive, but now I'm not so sure'! We reckon the whole installation will be a 500llb hit. 2 fat crew members. At least the weight will be in the middle of the boat and low down, fat crew members would likely be idling in the cockpit getting in the way. We are mindful that an engine would make the boat 100% more 'user friendly'. Getting underway off a mooring, engineless, in 'Sea Cow's Bay necessitates having at least 3 experienced hands ready to back the jib, waiting for the right moment, ready to ease the main if a gust hits on the bear away...and so on. Sailing back to the mooring is another far more complicated scenario that can easily end with the command 'jump, you fucker, jump!' (with a long line) Hey ho, it's only this Covid world that allows the consideration of such things. In the BVI we still have our borders closed and cannot see that changing anytime soon. Bad for business, but great for getting 'non essential' projects done like fixing TJ. We just wish hurricane season was not predicted to be quite so active, the weather has certainly become more fruity these last few days. So, here's a few pictures that look very much like many previous pictures posted. It takes an experienced eye to fully appreciate the volume of grinding necessary to make progress possible. Historical shot this evening shows a regatta winning 11 strong crew from the BVISR some years ago.
  3. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    So, the winner was... ’Lucky Strike’ the Corsair 24, followed by ‘Whoop Whoop’ one of the 3 27’s with 31’ ‘Island Hops’ completing the podium. Coco bought up the rear, this is as close as we got to them off Road Harbour.
  4. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    Hot Damn! Check out the start line for tomorrow's Lowell Wheatley Anegada Pursuit race. 6 tris here but another corsair set to show up...and Gunboat 66 Coco De Mer. Island Hops is a Corsair 31, Ting a Ling and Whoop Whoop are Corsair 27's, Lucky Strike a Corsair 24 and Airgasm is a Corsair Pulse 600. Back in the day it would just be Triple Jack but since we got wounded a whole bunch of peashooters have turned up! As per my last post I'm out cruising with the family BUT I hope to snap some shots of the main start at 11ish. The forecast is a perfect E 20kts to kick off with, moderating as the day goes on with a slight N'ly shift. Nice!
  5. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    Father's day, the Summer Solstice and the incredible Sahara dust...it was all going on today. Sometimes the resins flow, today it was that kind of day. Just 3 of us on the job but all of us determined to to lay down some cloth. Paul continued with his bow repairs, laying down a mosaic of core onto several fresh lower laminates around the fwd hatch. It looks kind of patchy, but once the core is ground fair the whole repair will quickly 'take shape' as the top laminates go on and over the rail. Steve can't walk past the front beam without longing for a lam. We joined forces and added another 4 laminates around the lower, outer section of the beam and on to the sponson itself. There's still a bunch of uni laminates to go on before we are done. On the laminating bench we knocked up an 8x4 sheet of 3/4" H80 divinycell with a single biax either side...in good old polyester! I have to admit I enjoy the Boatworks channel on U tube. He's a bit of a polyester fan for fabrication. As time goes on I'm questioning the 'epoxy only' mantra we have followed, polyester definitely has its place. This particular board will become the sub salon floor bulkheads. I mentioned the dust. I have never seen it this thick. At Nanny Cay we could barely see Peter Island, it's got thicker as the day went on. In Brewer's bay late this afternoon we could not see Jost Van Dyke, check out the two sunset pics from roughly the same spot on my balcony. It's a real pea-souper. No boat work next weekend, we are off sailing to Anegada. There is a race but Steve and I will be in family cruise mode. We hope to buzz the race fleet and get some footage, the forecast looks good with a moderating NE'ly trade and hopefully no dust! I'm taking out 'Bob' which IYM (my company) has been fixing for the last 2 years. He didn't do well in Irma, both masts came down and the wing foils shattered, one keel, one rudder and a whole bunch of holes punched through both hulls. Irma did one side, Maria finished the job! A familiar tale. Historical shots? There could be only 2 contenders on this day. Ryan and Rosie. Ryan, now nearly 21, is happily stuck in Annapolis with his Mum waiting on university in Southampton to re-open in September. He's a regular TJ crew when here, but wisely dodges any itchy boat work. Rosie has not sailed on TJ yet, but her time will come! To complete the picture, looking at the TJ girls racing to Anegada about 20 years ago, Ryan's Mum, Jaeda is the one on the right, second from left is Steve's fairer half, Sue!
  6. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    No work today but Steve and I did get a mid week early evening stint in. The mini 'fire truck' came into play. That has been fixed up now with the two 50 gallon water buts secured midships on the bed of the old Mitsubishi roller skate. A brand new shurflo 'blaster' does the honours coupled to its own 4D battery. Also in the truck is the 'ambient air' pump that supplies 15 cubic feet per minute of fresh air into a 3M hood that will make the upcoming grinding bearable. It's in the truck cab because it has AC, sending slightly chilled air down the pipe is quite nice. That machine takes one of our Honda generators to run it, the grinders run off #2. Needless to say, there is no power or water out on the Nanny Cay Peninsula. The bow repair is coming on well, this week will see remaining core chunks grafted in followed by upper laminates. Steve and I also re-acquainted ourselves with the stbd front beam repair and came up with a laminating schedule to finish that up. Apart from that we just drank a few Shaefers and oogled at the new mast that is sitting there in the rack. Of course there was also the mandatory 'are we mad?' reflective moment... on the bright side, they are becoming fewer as time passes. Historical shots this evening show the aft beam and main hull before they were attached for the first time back in 1979.
  7. racinginparadise

    Newick Outrigger 26/Somersault 26

    Very well said, both of you!
  8. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    A cracking day today with 5 of us on 3 different projects. Steve and I focused on the salon floor. We determined that the desired 30" wide engine bay was pretty much the full width of the main hull at the lowered floor level. We ended up sacrificing a couple of inches of headroom to get no less than 36" across the floor at the narrowest point,. we will still have over 6' of headroom everywhere. We also decided that an engine install is some way off so we will be glassing in a full 8' longitudinal stringer in with a new bulkhead at 56" aft of the main midships bulkhead. That will give the floorboards something to sit on and will stiffen up this part of the main hull no end. Oh yes, I neglected to say that the entire 8' section of floor will start by being smothered with a single laminate of 1708 biax. When you are adding structure to old girls such as TJ, I always reckon it is best to have new stringers or bulkheads bonded to fresh glass that radiates well away from the new parts. In this case we just decided it would be the whole floor. Pics from the next few weeks will better illustrate this process. Up forward the 2 Paul's took on the fwd main hull hatch and deck repairs. Most of the prep work had been done so it was just a case of cutting out core and biax to get the first stage down. Paul Junior was a pro ,carpet fitter some years ago so he is pretty dang good at mapping out a few lams of biax! Again, pics next week will show this job in more details but here you can see the start of it. So that leaves Henry. He has been tasked with sorting out all TJ's winches. Not easy. Some were pummeled into the concrete bridge and through the deck by Irma when she was upside down. All were full of mud and sand. To make matters worse we salvaged a pair of electric Lewmar 55 ST's and a bunch of smaller Lewmar ST's from a cruising mono that was down for a couple of months after Irma. With the JCB's rolling in to break her up we only managed to get the above deck sections. We are hopeful that they will become our manual primaries, time will tell. DtM, you ask about the mast. Well, we ended up with 4 masts. The first out of a J54(?), see very early in this thread. It turned out to be too heavily built to be a serious contender. Then came 54' of new Lagoon 45 mast. That again was very heavily built and a huge section, also short of 7'. Then came the brand new but broken in transit Swan mast destined for an early 42' It would have needed 2 splices and ALL fittings, with plenty of modifications required, it was a masthead rig. THEN came the undamaged carbon mast from the racing mono 'Blitz'. OK, so it cost us some real dollars but it hardly needs any modifications. We will not be using the rod rigging and have some spreader work to do but that's about it. It sits safely in a mast rack opposite TJ and it will stay there until hurricane season is done. Historical shot? Round Tortola November 2015, always a great race.
  9. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    Another sunny Sunday in the spookily quiet BVI's. The bad news is that we are looking at a month of closing repairs with lots of grinding. The good news is that there isn't anyone about to get too upset about us doing that! We do our best to contain the dust, but grinding is grinding, you cannot hide the scent! Today the old salon floor bearers got cut out and a large access hatch was cut out of the stbd salon rear beam bulkhead. There was a nasty looking crack upper forwards that had to be inspected/repaired from both sides. When we got in there we found the bulkhead was sound but it has given us access to deal with some other Irma compression wounds. We settled on a 56"x 30" 'box' to accommodate a 30hp engine/saildrive installation. We have the machinery ready to go but will not be fitting at this point. More important is ensuring there is a solid space ready to go when the time comes. The sides of the box will be longitudinal stringers, the aft end will be a new bulkhead. To support the floor across the engine space we will add an 'X' of vertical bulkheads that can be cut out later. All the work going on in the salon is made 100% easier by having the roof suspended up and out of the way. It hangs there like a giant carrot, the only finished structure on the boat just waiting to be set down and laminated in place. Material-wise we will be using 1/2" Coosa board, the lighter one, as a core material for small bulkhead repairs and some stringers. At $415 per 4'x8' sheet landed it is not cheap BUT when we worked out the time taken to make up cored panels plus materials it isn't much different. It's a new material to us so stay tuned to see how it works out. The foredeck repair is ready for lower laminates and core, we are using 3/8" divinicell up there to match the 3/8" airex used in the original build. Paul Westlake has taken on that repair while Steve and I are immersed in everything midships. The best comment of the day was Paul remarking how the whole project looks like being 'on the home straight'. Getting that coachroof back on board and having plans in place for all other repairs makes it feel like we have finally turned the corner. Mr. Buidsear, to answer your question of the winch bases. The primaries on top of the coachroof are by far the highest loads we deal with. I have been told that in 18kts of breeze our genoa fairleads experience about 2000llbs trying to pull them out of the roof, let's say a ton. I always imagine that to be approximately a Volkswagen beetle swinging around to picture it in my mind. So, the primaries are regularly seeing Volkswagen beetles trying to rip them out of the deck and canting then forwards and downwards. We mount them close to the aft bulkhead and have an alloy triangulated box to take the loads. In addition we will be removing core and filling each hole with 2" diameter high density plugs and will also add some 1708 'tongues' to beef up the coachroof top laminate. The backstay and spinnaker guy winches will be mounted on a new 'wing' either side of the cockpit, but more of that later. The historical shots show a time many years ago when we were allowed out in the Sir Francis Drake Channel in our boats! (no non-essential, non-sanctioned movement of boats is allowed, now our borders are closed) Not sure why the jib was aback, maybe heaving to for a transfer?
  10. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    A very satisfying morning on board today. We started by cutting away the 'fluff' around the edges of the new roof, lowered it into position and cut off the purpleheart beam ends to meet the vertical bulkhead in the salon. The falls worked brilliantly, allowing us to repeatedly raise and lower the roof until notches and trimmings were spot on. The final lowering into position could not have been better. The roof met the aft bulkhead perfectly and sat flat against the two aft beam verticals. We will have well over 6' head room down below but the roof is low and looks slippery. We now will concentrate on sorting the new salon floor/engine bay structure and making good where the stbd fwd bulkheads got crushed by Irma. All straightforward stuff compared to making the roof. The stbd track has ended up being 3/8" inside the 7 degree line, we can live with that. The new roof looks impressive viewed from below, it has opened up the space in the salon big time. It looks like it 'grew there' which I suppose it did, but we didn't expect such a trouble free first fitting! Stroll on!
  11. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    Here is a link to the latest round up video.
  12. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    So, the new cars have plastic sliders not Torlon balls. They can take some curve up/down and sideways...makes them less ‘rattely’!
  13. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    randii, I didn’t measure any angles but as you can see from this exaggerated sketch...if you line up the centre hole and then, using the track on the inside curve as a template, send down square/tangential pilot holes they end up being increasingly ‘wrong’ for fitting the track on the outside curve, the deck! i was aware of this BUT wanted my holes thro the Purple Heart beams evenly spaced and central. In my case getting to the ends meant about there was about 1/4” to ‘fudge either end. Not all my pilot holes came out on the 7 degree line either so there was some making good sideways too. To make it all possible the inner holes were only drilled halfway. The outer holes were only drilled with the track in place and the bamboo skewers showing the way to go. Holes were all slightly oversized to give a better chance. The track went on snug to the deck and the car runs fine.
  14. I had issues with an Antal track on a 1993 Norseman that I looked after. It had a power winch to hoist but issues were that sometimes it didn’t want to come down! i detirmined that the cars themselves were ‘locking up’ on the track. I tried sailcote, that gave a temporary relief but it always came back. The solution was to send all the cars off to Italy to be re-bushed. It was costly, about $700 from memory, but it worked. I’m thinking that maybe the power winch accelerated the wear?
  15. racinginparadise

    'Triple Jack' rebuild...FU Irma!

    a few more shots of track fitting.