afterguy

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About afterguy

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  1. I have a shoal draft Jeanneau 36i, very similar to the 379. It sails just fine for a cruising boat. It's not a race boat so if you expect that then don't buy a shoal draft cruising boat. It points 50 degrees off the true wind in flat water up to about 15 kts. If it gets breezier or lumpier you need to reef and/or fall off. Off the wind I fly a cruising chute. Makes hull speed in anything over 12 kts and about half of true below that, as long as you don't point too deep. It helps a lot to have a folding prop. I sailed it in big seas from San Diego to Turtle bay in under 48 hours averaging about 7 kts over two days, with a peak of 16 kts. Honestly, I couldn't have asked for more from a 36 footer. Took us down the west coast of Mexico and back without any problems. Shoal draft boats are not ideal, it's not something I prefer but your boat chooses you. You need to reef if the boat gets pressed and it will be comfortable and perform just fine. IMHO Jeanneaus are built a bit better than Beneteaus, particularly the earlier Jeanneaus. I looked at both before buying my boat. There are some areas where Jeanneau cuts corners to save money. I'm sure the other production builders are just the same or worse. Check out the Jeanneau owners mailing list if you have questions about a specific model.
  2. afterguy

    Looking for boat to borrow from LA to Catalina.

    You can charter a boat out of Long Beach. This time of year it shouldn't be too hard to get a boat. If you're going to do it this year then now would be a great time. The weather in SoCal is generally benign but once the first winter storm comes through it will be a very different proposition. A few years ago two people died when a winter storm ripped through Avalon. It was forecast and completely preventable so pay attention and you'll be fine.
  3. afterguy

    Sailing solo from Neah Bay down to San Fran

    If you just want a place to chill out you can anchor off of the beach on Angel Island in Raccoon Straight, between Pt Lone and Pt Stuart. There shouldn't be much in the way of swell or wake there but the current rips through so you'll want to set the hook well. Midweek you'll probably have it to yourself. The holding is good. If you have a dinghy or kayak go ashore on the beach. There are almost no facilities available but it's free and very beautiful. There are some cool museum tours, free I think. Go ashore at night* and walk to the top of Mt. Livermore for a fantastic panoramic view of the lights. * This may or may not be strictly legal.
  4. afterguy

    Books to get started on the Pacific?

    Before you do anything go sail in the ocean. You may or may not love it but make sure you don't hate it. Being sea sick sucks and some people never get over it. It is physically hard being on a boat for weeks on end. Lots of people can do it at all ages, make sure you're one of them. Try to charter a boat or help with a delivery or find some other way to spend a week or two at sea before you invest your retirement funds.
  5. afterguy

    Fixed VHF with remote and AIS

    Ajax, I have a C80. This sounds really promising. I'm wondering about the cabling here. Currently the NMEA input to the C80 is connected to the smartpilot. Where did you plug in the GX2200? Directly to the C80 or elsewhere via some other electronic gadgetry that lets the smartpilot and the GX2200 play together? Thanks
  6. afterguy

    Fixed VHF with remote and AIS

    longy, In a perfect world it would integrate with my Raymarine chartplotter but i don't think it's worth doing the integration, the plotter's old. So no integration, just leveraging AIS on the VHF.
  7. My fixed mount VHF radio died. I'd like the new one to have a remote mic and since I don't have AIS this seems like a good time to add it. Lots of options and I'm not sure which way to go with this. Should I just install a separate, wireless AIS system that talks to my phone? Wireless remote mic to avoid having to pull new wires etc.? Any ideas on alternatives/brands? Thanks.
  8. afterguy

    Weather Helm

    Work the traveler harder, it should be moving with each puff. At the top end of the wind range you can carry a big bubble in the luff of the main, just keep the battens flying. If you're doing that and still putting a rail under water then reef. It's faster to sail flat and reefed. Also hike your 69 year old fat ass a little harder ;).
  9. afterguy

    Chasing the dream.

    Screw all this negativity. Buy a boat with half your budget and go sailing. Avoid hurricanes if you can, bring a good attitude and you'll be fine and have an adventure*. Many a clueless idiot (which you may or may not be) have circumnavigated while the armchair experts sit around working on their qualifications. If you can fix a Yanmar you'll probably come home with more money than you started with. After a while you'll have a much better idea of the boat you should have bought so maybe you upgrade. There's only one place to get the education you need and that's behind the wheel of your own boat. * Adventures usually involve a healthy dose of suffering
  10. My boat has a shitty 10 year old Raytheon radar, it lights up like a christmas tree when there's a freighter anywhere within 10 miles. Navy radar is orders of magnitude better. Someone should have known exactly what was out there, where it was, how fast it was going. Not to mention that these ships show huge freaking lights. I've crossed many TSS at night, often short-handed and sleep deprived. Sometimes it's confusing, scary, weird. But if you keep your wits about you you can figure out what's going on, or slow until the situation clarifies. It's called prudent seamanship. The navy ship was faster, more maneuverable, with a bigger and better trained crew using better equipment. A whole freaking CIC full of people who have no other job than tracking what's going on in the area. A bridge with multiple lookouts. The ACX might have some legal culpability here but this is a navy fuck up of epic proportions. If the ACX had been actively hunting the destroyer it still should not have had a snowball's chance of getting anywhere near it. The only way this can happen is through leadership failures at multiple levels. There will be court martials, careers ruined, dishonorable discharges etc.
  11. afterguy

    Brand new and totally ignorant

    Welcome to boat ownership. The chainplates will not be the end of it. The annoying thing about boats is that there's always something that needs doing. The great thing is that there's always something that needs doing. Don't forget to punt the list and just go sailing! FWIW there's a forum specifically for asking fix-it questions, fix-it-anarchy. You'll get good advice here on CA from a very supportive crowd, feel free to keep doing it. But it's good etiquette to post these kinds of questions over there. And there are people over there who love to nerd out over fixing boats, maybe too much so ;)! You'll get great advice either way.
  12. afterguy

    Santa Barbara Sailing

    http://www.latitude3...ayid=469#Story2
  13. afterguy

    Santa Barbara Sailing

    Not only did Rush St. win the biggest class in the race, for the fourth (?) straight time, but they finished before a whole bunch of bigger boats that started up to half an hour earlier. This includes _all_ of the J105s, a Farr40, a Farr 49, a SC52 and a ULDB 60. A really amazing achievement! I'm sorry I wasn't with you guys.
  14. afterguy

    Santa Barbara Sailing

    Anyone looking for an extra crew this week? My usual ride (Rush St) is on the hard. I can do pretty much any position on the boat. I'm also happy to just sit on the rail and think heavy thoughts.
  15. afterguy

    Santa Barbara Sailing

    Seen in "The Log" > May 15 • 5:05 p.m. Santa Barbara Harbor Patrol officers responded to Stearns Wharf, where a fisherman reported a seagull had stolen his bait -- along with his > fishing rod and reel. Officers were unable to locate a seabird dragging a rod and reel.