jetboy

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About jetboy

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  1. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    My 30 minute time was from highway speed trailer to splash - but did not include rigging the sails - I generally toss them on as I'm motoring out of the marina or usually while I'm waiting for my wife to park the car and walk down. That part never really takes much effort if I leave the jib on top in the foredeck hatch, sheets stay in place. Main sail lives on a relatively complex boom that I'd like to simplify, but it's just a matter of one push release pin for the gooseneck, a clip for the main sheet to the boom , a clip for the halyard, then raise the sail, adjust the cleat on the outhaul track, and the downhaul lives on the sail/boom assembly so I attach and pull. My setup is 100% quick release swivel clips or push release pins. I don't tie any knots ever unless something goes wrong. If a rope is adjustable it has a cleat. I think that was probably the best time saving per dollar I've found. I've also been thinking about moving to a boomless main sail to further simplify the setup. This is one place I think the F22 main sail is better designed for my type of use. I think my low hanging fruit right now is folding beams replacing sliders that are overly complex. I should change my name to the lazy sailor! The pulse looks well sorted. I don't know exactly how the standing rigging is adjusted. One tip that I think might be worth looking at is to change the shrouds slightly. Having a split lower with one side that has a block set allows me to quickly release the length a bit without any fear of the mast falling down. What that means then is when I raise the mast I keep the two shrouds in place and I just tip the mast over-center and it makes attaching the forestay super easy because it's not under tension. Then I have both sides marked where to tighten the blocks. It makes standing the mast a lot easier than it is with shrouds that are fixed and then trying to adjust a turnbuckle after standing the rig. The other lower split shroud on mine is just a short dyneema line. I think it carries most of the load.
  2. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    Thanks. That is kinda what I had thought about typical time. It's really the amount of work moreso than the time, but it's hard to quantify an amount of work. I find that if I'm feeling lazy I'll just take out the kayak instead. That kinda defeats the purpose of having a sailboat.
  3. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    I'm mostly curious because in my timing of my own setup about 15-18 minutes out of the 30 is for assembly of the beams and floats. Mine slide, not fold. Also I do not have a spinnaker to rig - although it may be added soon. I leave most of my rigging in place. The main sheet is a 6:1 block that I remove and store. Otherwise the traveler is used with a clip for one of the mast tie downs, and it stays in place - the excess rope is stored in an underseat cubby. All of the standing rigging is left in place and coiled and tied up and hung off the mast for transport. All of the mast running rigging also lives on the mast in place. My two jib halyards are used like the traveler as a mast tie down and the excess rope is again stored inside the cabin. But the cars stay in place and I use the jib sheets to stabilize the mast as it goes up. The main sail stays attached to the boom and I basically just tie it up inside the lazy jacks and toss in a sail bag and then it goes inside the cabin mostly assembled. I would think a Pulse roller reefing boom would be great for easy storage, but having not used one I don't know. My boom is much more complicated (maybe unnecessarily so) because it has a track and car along with a 2:1 block and cleat for the outhaul, plus another full set minus the track for reefing, and then a mast rotation control setup on the underside, rather than a cabin top type mast rotation control. I can't roll mine. I may change this. I just bought a mylar sail and it doesn't flake very well... I use a 3:1 block on each shroud for rig tension and I pre-mark the rope so I know basically where I need to tighten them - they also stay in place and travel inside my collapsed trampolines. Anyway, that's my system. I'm on the fence of spending another $1k or so on a folding system or keeping it as a slider. My inclination is to have the parts for the folding beams cut and get on with making it fold not slide. But not if it's a waste of money with no time savings. My mast is only 8.5 meters so I can just lift it into place. I don't think I could lift a 9.5 meter mast. I have 3 masts, so I may cut one down to maybe 7.5 meters just for the sake of making it easy for the 90% of the time I'm leisure sailing. A 7.5 meter mast might look silly on a Pulse as it's a good bit larger boat. My curiosity with the Pulse is that it's pretty close to a dream boat for me. If money were no concern, I would sell my current boat for whatever I could get and buy a Pulse. It wasn't available when I started building my trimaran 4 years ago. An F22 is kinda big, but in retrospect it could serve my purposes very well. Like the Pulse it's gotten quite expensive compared to initial estimates. Nor was the Astus 16.5, which is more realistic in my price range. The Weta was an alternative, but not great for 4 people. And a Hobie getaway was also in the mix. As it is now, I probably can't justify the cost to trade. Maybe in a few years. Can you store all of the sails and gear in the boat somewhere? Both for transport and/or longer term storage. I considered eliminating my cabin entirely, but chose to retain about an 8 foot cabin for the purpose of storing all the sailing gear, I have no intention of ever sleeping in it or even going inside it. I can, but it's very small. I also have the anchor locker in the front. I beach it a lot and it's nice to have a locker that drains to stick the wet rope and anchor in. Where do you store the anchor and rope in the Pulse? I still put a cover over it when parked, but it is nice to keep all the stuff inside. I do tow it on the interstate regularly, so for you metric folks, 120kph is the posted speed limit meaning actual speeds are more like 130kph, and I go about 110 in the slow lane. If it were left at the same state of assembly as I leave mine you'd be left with just folding out the beams, attaching the shrouds, standing the mast, putting the motor and rudder assembly on, and putting the sails on. In my mind I feel like I could run through that in 15 minutes. Maybe I'm delusional. Wouldn't be the first time...
  4. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    Can anyone give a good idea of setup time. I timed my home-build Scarab 18 trimaran setup yesterday. I re-deisgned it for a sliding system that I am not totally happy with. I designed very close tolerance (.012 inches) tubing and it binds, so I've re-worked some of it. My time yesterday from stepping out of the vehicle at the marina to backing down the ramp was just under 29 minutes. That was setting it up alone. And I stand the mast the old fashion way - with my back, so that part is pretty quick. Teardown was similar, at around 31 minutes from ramp to highway going home. I'd very much like to cut that time in half. Can a Pulse 600 be setup in 15 minutes alone? Setup time makes a big difference for me. For an afternoon of sailing I often go on a whim. If I'm feeling lazy I just take the kayak to the lake. As far as market goes - I completely agree with honestjohn. I went back and forth between beach cat and 4ksb. Neither fit the bill. My trimaran does. I don't entirely know why it works as well as it does, but it points better than any other boat I've ever sailed. The beach cats can outrun me on a broad reach most of the time. I've yet to have one pass me up-wind. Not to say they couldn't, just hasn't happened yet. In heavy wind the experience is completely different. It's mostly dry. It's not scary for non-sailors. All out performance was not a top criteria for me. An a-cat or F18 is probably going to be a better buy if that's the goal.
  5. jetboy

    F-22 Update

    It's kinda like asking what a hotrod is worth. But I'd say ballpark of $50k would be a midrange figure. Could go up or down $25k depending on lots of factors. Just my opinion based on what a F24 goes for. I think doubling the price would put you in the ballpark.
  6. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    Searail vs Pulse600. Is there really any question why one weighs more? (I'll give you a hint: it's those things on the outside)
  7. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    Out of curiosity, what is an appropriate weight? If it were 800lbs, would it be significantly more attractive to a lot of buyers?
  8. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    It's a tricky market. It's somewhere between one-off and mass production. I've kicked around the idea of starting a small factory to produce a competing boat. Having built one myself, I'm pretty confident that I could bring the price WAY down, but the only way I've run the numbers to do so is to do short production runs and then close up shop for 11 months a year. Basically set up you production to run for 1 or 2 months and build a year's worth of boat parts and then shut it all down and sell out your stock. How do you manage this around another full time job or without a special deal on your commercial space and find temporary labor that is also highly skilled or at least has the attention to detail necessary? That's the only way I can make it work in theory at least to get the costs down. I'm not sure it's worth it, obviously it hasn't been for me yet. The astus 16.5 has its own thread. It's a lot closer to a low budget trimaran, but still quite $. The Hobie getaway is where you'd need to shoot for if you wanted to hit a lower price point. I've sailed a bunch of them. Actually pretty fine sailing boats for what they are. Performance boats they are not. Foam sandwich construction has to go if you want to get costs down. It's too expensive. So then what? Thermoform plastic mixed with fiberglass of some sort? Solid glass? IMO the Pulse is a dream day sailor. It's the boat I would have built if I had more time and $. There's also room for a lower costs "people's boat" in the 20' tri market. It just hasn't happened yet.
  9. jetboy

    F-22 Update

    We were all kinda curious what would become of the MacGregor 26 molds. Now we know. (I've got a soft spot for MacGregor boats - I used to own an early swing keel MacGregor 17. She was kind of a piece of shit, but I have a lot of fun memories sailing that little boat.)
  10. jetboy

    Corsair Pulse 600

    FWIW - I have a Nissan 3.5hp 4stroke long shaft on my 18' trimaran and it's plenty of power for my use. I've been thinking about upgrading to a high thrust prop though just to get a bit more at the top end. Wide open it'll do around 5kts. Excellent little motor as far as being reliable, quiet, and lasts forever on a 1/4 gallon tank of gas.
  11. jetboy

    Douchebag gets off easy but wtf is she talking about?

    If that's my daughter, I would support the shortest prison term I could...
  12. jetboy

    NEW ASTUS 16.5

    Sounds like you made a good choice! I'm excited about this boat. Can't wait to hear unaffiliated review from a real sailor. I'm really curious about setup and take down time and effort.
  13. jetboy

    NEW ASTUS 16.5

    The rig for a Rave looks like total overkill with large diameter stainless uppers and lowers on a short, stout mast and a heavily built sail, until you consider that it cannot heal with the self adjusting hydrofoils trying to keep it flat. Trifoilers split the load between two smaller rigs. Hydrofoil stabilized boats just load up more and more while the boat accelerates like a watermelon seed squeezed between strong fingers! Have we seen photos of your tri with the donor NACRA 5.2? I can believe the sail shredded and the mast was nearing it's failure point as well! I think I put them on here somewhere. I'll see if I can find them. It was an old sail and probably a poor quality reef point that added to the failure. I didn't feel like the mast was at risk because the reef point was already really deep. Maybe 30% or so. It was one of those days with 8ish average winds and gusts into the high 30's. Not great sailing conditions.
  14. jetboy

    NEW ASTUS 16.5

    I suspect Wayne is correct on the design idea of just relying on reefing rather than mast head flex to blow off during a gust. I kinda tend to think that it's not a terrible way to go as beach cats aren't really practical to reef in heavy wind, so the tuned mast section is pretty critical to safety in higher winds. My limited experience with my small trimaran suggests reefing early is a fine option. I reef when I wouldn't on a catamaran with the same sail area because of how stiff the boat is in terms of righting moment. The stability of the boat might lead to broken upper mast sections if it's not pretty stiff as it won't heel over like a cat. My last day out I ripped the entire main sail (from a Nacra) in half from the reef point in a 35ish gust. In any beach cat I've sailed before I probably would have been capsized, but the trimaran just heeled a bit and then the sail blew out. Kinda hit home not only the additional RM from the beam (mine is 15' wide) but also how stiff it is initially compared to the donor Nacra 5.2 the sail and the amas came from. The same gust of wind *feels* like it has greater impact force. I think that the stiff mast combined with a smaller main sail and larger asym will probably offer a lot of safety with the ability to depower the asym. It's a lot harder to do with an big main sail. A more experienced sailor might prefer the big main sail. I'm simply thinking out loud that it may be a decision to make the boat more user friendly for newer sailors.
  15. jetboy

    NEW ASTUS 16.5

    I've found that they're not a problem at all for riding on the ama. It probably will depend on where you like to sit for the balance of that boat. For me it's my favorite driving position when the wind is up to stand outside the shrouds. Having two lines to hang onto is an okay thing. Gives me great visibility of everything going on. I can watch the leward float while I drive and trim. Feels like being on a trap. And - possibly you could hook a trap to the connecting ring with a short cable if you really wanted to.