Fireball

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About Fireball

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  1. Fireball

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    I've always thought that a LOA of 35 to 40 feet is a good choice for the foiling cats: big enough to have multiple crew and to not worry about trapezes, but small enough to keep the costs down. BTW: I suspect that the same will apply to the foiling monos - LOA of 35 to 40 feet will turn out to be a good choice.
  2. Fireball

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    According to their website, the long term plan is to have 18m, 24m and 28m wing sizes and they are currently racing with the 24m wing. So these boats are very over rigged for San Francisco Bay. I guess the plan is to hope nothing too bad happens this regatta and next time they can use the small wings.
  3. Fireball

    Larry's AC50 Circus

    Plus the SailGP regattas Larry is funding in 2019 are similar to the old ACWS which he has been funding since 2012. They also include ex-Oracle AC sailors such as Tom Slingsby, Kyle Langford and Rome Kirby.
  4. Fireball

    SailGP - Sydney Inaugural Regatta

    I watched the racing on Saturday from Bradleys Head. I enjoyed it and I think most of the crowd did as well. The boats look to be very well sorted - as you would expect being the third generation of this type of boat. Some of the crew's look like they need more practice, but this is the first regatta of the series, so let's wait until later in the year before judging them. There are plenty of Olympic medalists and world champions, so the overall quality is certainly there. Another point is that Coutts has gone for relatively young sailors. I can see the same group of sailors competing for many years to come. I'd view it as the old ACWS finally done right. The boats are state of the art and it's now the main competition, not some supporting act.
  5. Fireball

    Team NYYC

    ???? They are on port tack - have a look at the start of the clip when the boat is not foiling and is heeling to starboard.
  6. Fireball

    Team UK

    I'm not sure about the discussion on how the new monos will be aerodynamically much cleaner than the cats. Mini frack has floats hanging off either side, deck spreaders, plus the big windward foil in the air. It looks like it has plenty of aero drag.
  7. Fireball

    Team UK

    I'm not defending INEOS's business practices, but prior to their involvement the press releases from Ainslie and Simmer sounded like they may not be able to run a competitive campaign. So the choice to the team may have been INEOS or nothing.
  8. Fireball

    shit show (front page)

    ^ I think they are different incidents. After the photo above the main foil appears to ventilate, but the rudder doesn't. The boat pitches down and comes to a sudden stop, but doesn't appear to capsize. In the grainy home video the rudder appears to ventilate first and the boat yaws into the wind, pitches up, rolls to leeward, the main foil ventilates and the boat drops from maximum height. So we have yaw, pitch, roll and heave. It seems that sailing these boats you really don't want the rudder to let go at anytime.
  9. Fireball

    shit show (front page)

    I'm sure we're going to see many different ways to capsize the new boats in the next couple of years and over the last 5 years or so we've seen many different ways to capsize the cats. But I doubt they are going to be exactly the same capsizes. In this case the boat lifts up and the leeward foil comes to the surface and ventilates. So the hull falls from maximum height, which is the distance from the t-foil to the hull. In a cat this distance is smaller. The boat just falls to the leeward arma. The cats mainly capsized after a pitchpole. I don't recall seeing anything like the capsize in this video
  10. Fireball

    shit show (front page)

    I suspect that a crash like this on the full sized version would break the mast. What would happen to the crew and the rest of the boat is probably ugly as well. The sequence seems to be: Rudder lets go Boat spins into the wind Boat trips over leeward foil Boat violently capsizes to leeward
  11. Fireball

    Teams?

    There was some luck during AC34 and AC35 in that none of the boats were wrecked during the racing (though some were wrecked before the racing). So there were actually 4 boats racing in AC34 (sort of racing in the case of Artemis) and there were 6 boats racing in AC35. They need the same good fortune for AC36 where none of the boats are destroyed in capsizes or collisions. 4 boats racing is a lot better than 2 or 3.
  12. The rules can be changed, but it could be controversial because the changes could suit some teams more than others. We've seen this before in AC34: trying to develop a new type of boat while running a regatta.
  13. Fireball

    Teams?

    I suspect it's because of their new found funding from Ineos. Before the new sponsorship racing someone else's boat was a good plan in their circumstances. They could save their money for the AC75. Now they have plenty of money there may be better options that involve Ainslie being the helmsman.
  14. Fireball

    Teams?

    The list of entries for AC34 and when they withdrew is complicated. Have a look at these links if you're interested. http://www.cupinfo.com/en/ac34-americas-cup-2013-official-challenger-entry-order.php http://www.cupinfo.com/en/americas-cup-challenger-index-2013-34-01.php But at the AC34 entry deadline of 31 March 2011 there were 12 entries accepted.
  15. Fireball

    Teams?

    ^ It's worth recalling that AC34 had 14 entries, of which 12 were accepted, and only 3 made it to the challenger rounds. Maybe wait until 2021 before judging how the changes for AC36 have fared.