Waynemarlow

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About Waynemarlow

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    As far from the sea as possible in the UK

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  1. Waynemarlow

    F7 Folding Trimaran...This is interesting

    Easy, just cut the existing bottom along the mid seam, widen it by 50mm and make the bow bottom section longer to cope with the now gap, the top section remains the same and voila you have a reverse bow. Make new hull molds ( unlike Farrier there's no liners on the inside ), at that point there's no propriety licencing as its a new design.
  2. Waynemarlow

    Help to improve cruising catamaran to windward

    You're missing the point of dropping off a bit, its about building speed up which then brings the wind forward which means that you can then head up more toward the mark at the increased speed, the best sailors just seem to be able do that naturally, others like me have to work at the balance of speed and building apparent wind speed to achieve best vmg.
  3. Waynemarlow

    F101

    I've been following the F101 since first launch and today had the chance to sail on it. First I really must complement the designers and builders for what is a really well engineered product, the quality is something way beyond what you can normally see on some of the production beach cats, and although it is quite a complex design and high component count, everything seems to have a purpose and designed for that purpose. All to often with the foiling A's there's just a mad nest of ropes and pulleys operating foils and AOA and the likes. On the F101, one foil adjusted by a simple " pull the rope " system " and an adjustable rudder foil via the tiller AKA Moth style just makes it all simple. No forward wand and all its linkages, but a simplified wand on the back of the dagger board and T foil, it may not be the ultimate for performance ( that could be debated ) but makes the launch and fit out as practical as you can get. The builders endlessly talk about making a Foiler as uncomplicated as possible, as for most the work load of first sailing these boats is high and to get people early foiling, the boat must do the work. They have set a pretty high bar here and although there's lots of bits and pieces to adjust and finesse, once set, its set and forget. Even the design and placement of the Ama's have been set as an attempt to promote an early indicator of where and how the boat should be for it to launch up onto the foil. Everything on the boat is designed to be pragmatic about getting the job done in the least hassle at minimum cost in work load to the skipper. The designers spoke at great length that as yet the F101 is not a race boat ( its too early in its learning curve about how best to utilise the design ), but a pleasure boat, set up for early foiling and the exhilaration of foiling is what its job is. But to me a boat has to be more than the pleasure of just foiling. In an endeavor to get more people foil racing, they are proposing that F101 races should be designed around the boat and those who sail it ( they call it " The Tribe " ), that may not be conventional racing per-see but downwind slalom races, odd courses such as star or compass point style where competitors try to reach certain points which are becoming increasingly harder to achieve. This may not be conventional but it may well be something that we should all maybe should think as a way to get more people sailing. Probably for me the biggest downer was the rig, its a dingy rig, sort of a cross between a 49er and moth, its very very good looking and everything seems to work well, but its a dinghy rig and I know nothing about dinghy rigs. Wheres the rotating rig with lots of down haul and loads of main sheet. To sit with the tiller across your lap pulling a tiny 5mm line through your rear hand by the forward hand just like a laser, will have to be learnt. Line loads are just ridiculously light and getting used to locking off the Code 0 ( I think we should really just be saying big jib here as its in all intents and purposes its an over size jib ) , this is more dinghy handling than catamaran handling. The other biggest difference to us cat sailors is that you always feel as though you are on the wrong side of the boat with the rig always feeling like its about to come over on you. But once you get used to its stability once it has flip flopped over onto its Ama's and understand that once over on the Ama, there is loads of stability, the boat is actually quite easy to not get wet in. My own small Tri is set up to progressively use the RM of the lee Ama as any heel goes on but with the F101's Amas set so high that you end up feeling like you are sailing on a knife edge with the catch all of the Amas when things go wrong, the Ama saves your day. Why the high Amas, look up Veel Heel and you can understand why the makers are saying the performance is better than a Wasp and getting up towards a full on Moth. Well how does it sail. Sadly for me once again the wind gods were against me and the forecast of 4 - 6 knots was what I got, hence all the flip flopping and flailing about that I seemed to do. Everything was so marginal that getting any real feel of its true potential was a dream on one hand and an impossible task on the other. But I always say that the best boats are the ones that can be sailed in the lightest winds. Here the F101 is about as good if not better than my cats and could be sailed around low rider style at speeds that impressed me even with those foils below. Is it 49er dinghy speeds, probably not, but once you spent a bit of time in the boat, you could balance the boat out on the single centre hull and go upwind and down at will, I have to say for having so much appendage down on such a light wind day, this is a really slippery hull. The makers have already a set of caps to replace the foils if you so desire but to be honest how many of you would sail in sub 6 knot winds. Did we get foiling at all, there were two of us trialing the boat today, both just under or around 90 kilos and yup in one tiny zephyr of a puff, my fellow sailor was up and off, almost to his horror of what do I now do and about 50 metres on, there was inevitable drop in wind and splash down. This was such a frustrating day in some ways as the wind was there but just not quite enough. I think though that having seen how easy it was for my fellow sailor to get up onto the foils once the wind set in, even at 6 knots of wind, a seasoned sailor familiar with the boat may well have been foiling or there abouts. In talking to the makers, who I can only highly recommend as being true enthusiasts and gentlemen dedicated to sailing, speeds are already high with regular water speeds up around 17 knots and already a 27 knot burst being recorded, but they did emphasize they are not really interested in speed, that's pure moth territory, but more to just getting more people foiling easily. Over all impressions, really really good quality boat, loads of potential, but of course I will need another invite to really see the true potential ( hint hint hint ). Thanks Foilingworld to the introduction to the F101.
  4. Waynemarlow

    F101 Foiling Tri--2017

    I've been following the F101 since first launch and today had the chance to sail on it. First I really must complement the designers and builders for what is a really well engineered product, the quality is something way beyond what you can normally see on some of the production beach cats, and although it is quite a complex design and high component count, everything seems to have a purpose and designed for that purpose. All to often with the foiling A's there's just a mad nest of ropes and pulleys operating foils and AOA and the likes. On the F101, one foil adjusted by a simple " pull the rope " system " and an adjustable rudder foil via the tiller AKA Moth style just makes it all simple. No forward wand and all its linkages, but a simplified wand on the back of the dagger board and T foil, it may not be the ultimate for performance ( that could be debated ) but makes the launch and fit out as practical as you can get. The builders endlessly talk about making a Foiler as uncomplicated as possible, as for most the work load of first sailing these boats is high and to get people early foiling, the boat must do the work. They have set a pretty high bar here and although there's lots of bits and pieces to adjust and finesse, once set, its set and forget. Even the design and placement of the Ama's have been set as an attempt to promote an early indicator of where and how the boat should be for it to launch up onto the foil. Everything on the boat is designed to be pragmatic about getting the job done in the least hassle at minimum cost in work load to the skipper. The designers spoke at great length that as yet the F101 is not a race boat ( its too early in its learning curve about how best to utilise the design ), but a pleasure boat, set up for early foiling and the exhilaration of foiling is what its job is. But to me a boat has to be more than the pleasure of just foiling. In an endeavor to get more people foil racing, they are proposing that F101 races should be designed around the boat and those who sail it ( they call it " The Tribe " ), that may not be conventional racing per-see but downwind slalom races, odd courses such as star or compass point style where competitors try to reach certain points which are becoming increasingly harder to achieve. This may not be conventional but it may well be something that we should all maybe should think as a way to get more people sailing. Probably for me the biggest downer was the rig, its a dingy rig, sort of a cross between a 49er and moth, its very very good looking and everything seems to work well, but its a dinghy rig and I know nothing about dinghy rigs. Wheres the rotating rig with lots of down haul and loads of main sheet. To sit with the tiller across your lap pulling a tiny 5mm line through your rear hand by the forward hand just like a laser, will have to be learnt. Line loads are just ridiculously light and getting used to locking off the Code 0 ( I think we should really just be saying big jib here as its in all intents and purposes its an over size jib ) , this is more dinghy handling than catamaran handling. The other biggest difference to us cat sailors is that you always feel as though you are on the wrong side of the boat with the rig always feeling like its about to come over on you. But once you get used to its stability once it has flip flopped over onto its Ama's and understand that once over on the Ama, there is loads of stability, the boat is actually quite easy to not get wet in. My own small Tri is set up to progressively use the RM of the lee Ama as any heel goes on but with the F101's Amas set so high that you end up feeling like you are sailing on a knife edge with the catch all of the Amas when things go wrong, the Ama saves your day. Why the high Amas, look up Veel Heel and you can understand why the makers are saying the performance is better than a Wasp and getting up towards a full on Moth. Well how does it sail. Sadly for me once again the wind gods were against me and the forecast of 4 - 6 knots was what I got, hence all the flip flopping and flailing about that I seemed to do. Everything was so marginal that getting any real feel of its true potential was a dream on one hand and an impossible task on the other. But I always say that the best boats are the ones that can be sailed in the lightest winds. Here the F101 is about as good if not better than my cats and could be sailed around low rider style at speeds that impressed me even with those foils below. Is it 49er dinghy speeds, probably not, but once you spent a bit of time in the boat, you could balance the boat out on the single centre hull and go upwind and down at will, I have to say for having so much appendage down on such a light wind day, this is a really slippery hull. The makers have already a set of caps to replace the foils if you so desire but to be honest how many of you would sail in sub 6 knot winds. Did we get foiling at all, there were two of us trialing the boat today, both just under or around 90 kilos and yup in one tiny zephyr of a puff, my fellow sailor was up and off, almost to his horror of what do I now do and about 50 metres on, there was inevitable drop in wind and splash down. This was such a frustrating day in some ways as the wind was there but just not quite enough. I think though that having seen how easy it was for my fellow sailor to get up onto the foils once the wind set in, even at 6 knots of wind, a seasoned sailor familiar with the boat may well have been foiling or there abouts. In talking to the makers, who I can only highly recommend as being true enthusiasts and gentlemen dedicated to sailing, speeds are already high with regular water speeds up around 17 knots and already a 27 knot burst being recorded, but they did emphasize they are not really interested in speed, that's pure moth territory, but more to just getting more people foiling easily. Over all impressions, really really good quality boat, loads of potential, but of course I will need another invite to really see the true potential ( hint hint hint ). Thanks Foilingworld to the introduction to the F101.
  5. Waynemarlow

    Trapeze Harness's

    I do sympathize with the crotch issue, my present Crewsaver harness has twin leg straps and never had a problem, I have a wind surfer nappy style which leaves one with a very high voice after a couple of hours. When you look at all the new harness's they are almost all " nappy " style and this was the main reason I posted the question, as all the other harness's I wear have twin crotch straps.
  6. Waynemarlow

    Trapeze Harness's

    My old favorite harness just decided to explode itself with the quite hilarious result of being dragged along the water from one side, its ferkin difficult to get yourself back on board from being dangled side on. So who's using what and can you recommend anything that gives good back support as well as allowing for my lardy backside.
  7. Waynemarlow

    Corsair Pulse 600

    Umm in most beach cats you let off the mast rotation when flying the spinny as the mast is stronger in the narrow axis than the wider front to rear axis, which is counter to what you would think. Also don't release the main sheet, that's your back stay and controls the top of the mast by the tension on the sail.
  8. Waynemarlow

    Lashings...

    I've been using 2mm for lashings on the forestay for some time and have been simply using a number of 1/2 hitches in a pattern of 2 clockwise and then 2 anti clockwise for about 6 hitches. They will come undone though at that point unless you simply use an old Australian secret of taking the tail through the centre of the lashings and pulling it down tight against the top hitch. The 1/2 hitches seem to stay tight and the tail never seems to move.
  9. Waynemarlow

    Umm, tiller?

    Guys the best sticks are actually fibre glass, carbon maybe light, maybe expensive, but break incredibly easy when you fall out the back and the only thing between you and the boat sailing away is holding onto the stick ( don't ask how I know ) . I've now started to put a piece of thin dyneema down the tube with a knot at either end through the side of the stick, when the stick breaks at least you are still connected. The best stick I've found is 15mm pultruded fiber glass tube which you can easily source off the web, it comes in 3m lengths and the only downside is, it has fiberglass strands near the surface which is not great on the hands, I simply put a length of light weight clear heat shrink down the pole and that also has gives it much better bending stabilty as it holds the tube shape, which is the nemesis of pultruded tube. If you want to get the fiber glass more stiff but still want a bit of flex when things do go wrong, you can also buy carbon braid and simply use the fiberglass tube as the former, it works well and is in someways the best of both carbon and fiberglass tube.
  10. Waynemarlow

    Furling Spinnakers on beach cats?

    Recently a convert to a furling spinny on a small Tri I'm playing with, I have to say that I thought that the upwind penalty would have been too great, but on the water the convenience and speed of setting and furling just far out weighs any disadvantage, enough that I think the S1 from the same Outlaw Sailing is the way to go forward for the single handed sailors whilst racing. Its also interesting to see the SCHRS calculator now has a setting for code O's and the likes on the mid girth measurement. If you fire in say 65% girth instead of the more normal 75% of a pure spinny, it doesn't effect your handicap so much as to not consider giving it a go. Certainly next single handed Cat I have will be fitted with a furler.
  11. Waynemarlow

    F-16 Viper or Falcon?

    The HT had a consumer problem, it didn't have a jib and very few could understand the single main as a concept, great boats though.
  12. Waynemarlow

    F-16 Viper or Falcon?

    Pity the F18 doesn't weigh 135kgs instead of 180, it would be a stunning boat and would have moved on with the better materials and production techniques that now available.
  13. Waynemarlow

    F-16 Viper or Falcon?

    Do consider the Nacra F16 as well, a few more around at not too unreasonable prices, about the same weight as the Viper and the ability on the later boat to fit C foils.
  14. Waynemarlow

    DC Designs

    Is there a generally accepted hull shape which is suitable for us fat bottomed and more lardy types ( about 100kg ), thanks
  15. Waynemarlow

    A Class Worlds - Classic Division

    I'm not sure, my F16 had canted boards in ( and T foil rudders ) and although I had no direct comparison as it was a one off ( A Class shortened ) above about 10knots it was very noticeable that the hull was almost out of the water. I say almost, just skimming. At slower speeds if you could get enough wind to lift the windward hull excessively you could almost skim the hull again on its side. The other F16's about Nacra, Viper and Stealth were no faster and it always came down to skipper error rather than boat speed. It was only the Nacra F16 which was the first of the bunch with high aspect boards that seemed to be able to pull away in very very light airs.