Jud - s/v Sputnik

Members
  • Content Count

    3,144
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

621 F'n Saint

About Jud - s/v Sputnik

  • Rank
    Super Anarchist

Profile Information

  • Location
    Canada

Recent Profile Visitors

4,186 profile views
  1. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Astrolabe Anarchy!

    Makes sense. It’s entirely different learning cel nav theory vs. practice! (That’s where I think it would be very useful indeed to have someone help you practice actual sight taking, so that you can learn common errors.) Re: height - one thing I’ve heard (from someone very experienced at cel nav) is that, for regular sights (i.e., not noon sights), you generally don’t shoot the sun lower than around 15º —b/c of more refraction at that altitude and the difficulty of correcting for it well; or higher than about 70º —because it’s generally harder to shoot an object that high.
  2. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Astrolabe Anarchy!

    If three colours denotes complexity to you, well, what can I say... :-) For me, who doesn’t understand celestial completely —I’m a total beginner, in fact— and spherical trigonometry even less— the short vid works (for me) to explain visually the bare bones basic concept of how your latitude is related to a celestial body’s declination and an obtained zenith distance. (I.e., three different possible scenarios.) No spherical trig required. :-) To each his/her own. (The point of this thread I started was to encourage others with no knowledge of celestial - I’m sure spherical trig is cool, but definitely not required for basic celestial nav.) But I’m curious what you mean by, “one could get confused if the sun is nearly overhead. Consider a glance at the compass to preserve the sign of the zenith distance, no?” Could get confused about what? I thought the idea of a noon shot is simply that you take a sight (at LAN) and get Hs, correct it to Ha and then Ho, and obtain ZD from that. (90-Ho) Find the sun’s declination in the alamanac. And, with that info, determine your latitude based on (visually/conceptually) whether you and the body are (a) in different hemispheres; or, if you’re in the same hemisphere, whether the body is (b) N of you, or (c) S of you. Do you mean one could easily get confused in cases (b) and (c)? (I’ve literally only taken two or three sights before, so I’m not entirely clear what you mean.)
  3. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Astrolabe Anarchy!

    That went right over my head... Ok, why...let’s think about this... ——> Your hemisphere latitude and the body’s hemisphere latitude/GP/declination are different...so, Latitude = Zenith Distance - Declination ——> Next possibility, your hemisphere is the same as the body’s, and the body is south of you, so, Latitude = ZD + Dec ——> Final possibility, same hemispheres, but the body is north of you Latitude = Dec - ZD I dunno!!! I don’t have this stuff intuitively now/yet.
  4. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Furuno Weather Fax

    Another possibly useful resource - just realized I have it on board. Its just a small book, about 1/4” thick and 100 pages, but he covers things from tuning a radio to help improve fax reception, antennas and other radio stuff, to forecasting wind from map isobars and related weather stuff.
  5. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    My season just ended, and...

    My summer season just ended - and now getting ready for fall and winter! :-) Recommissioned the diesel heater - it’s roaring away right now. And, looky there - there’s snow on them hills across the mooring field! A bit early for skiing, but it’s just around the corner...
  6. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Astrolabe Anarchy!

    Video with a “quick and dirty“ procedure for latitude by noon sight at Local Apparent Noon (LAN). (This presupposes you already have some basic background in cel nav theory, but it’s pretty straightforward and covers basic scenarios/how-to’s once you do.) I find the quality of instructional vids can vary widely, even by the same video maker (Chris Nolan, the maker of this vid is very experienced —he’s commanded CG ships and teaches cel nav, among many other things— and generally teaches well, but another of his noon sight vids I watched wasn’t nearly as clear as this one, which gets right to the point). As I find other good cell nav vids, etc,I’ll post here. The only thing this vid doesn’t get into is how to actually know when it is exactly Local Apparent Noon, I.e., the time of Meridian Passage, for your sight. I understand that you find this in the Nautical Almanac (the Mer. Pass. table in the daily pages), but I don’t think (?) you can find it *exactly* that way - hence the need to take a few sights before and after the meridian passage time given in the Almanac. (And this is sometimes why it is said that experienced navigators don’t necessarily like noon latitude shots - (1) b/c of the need to do not one, but several shots to analyze/determine which one is actually at the sun’s highest point, and (2) because “placing all your navigational eggs in one basket” and planning to get a shot of the sun at noon means the sky must be clear then - and it may well not be. Thus, doing standard sun shot-running fix-sun shot sights throughout the day give you lots more navigational flexibility. But these, of course, require much more work with tables than a noon latitude shot. Nevertheless, the noon shot is a good technique to know - and because it’s conceptually quite simple, I’ve found it’s a good way to help solidify the more complex stuff you need to learn for a full sight.
  7. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Girl with patreon account goes sailing in hot place

    For sure - who knows the situation. And I suppose that direct lightning strikes are statistically probably rather rare, even in the tropics . It’s just that when they happen they can be bad...
  8. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Girl with patreon account goes sailing in hot place

    Sailing in the tropics and had no lightning protection...isn’t bonding the mast to ground just common sense (assuming you’ve read some basic stuff on prepping a boat for an ocean crossing, etc, e.g. http://honeynav.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/grounding.pdf)? Maybe not.
  9. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Girl with patreon account goes sailing in hot place

    Oh, it’ll be sinking for as long as he needs Patreon folks to keep kicking in :-)
  10. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Furuno Weather Fax

    You’ll definitely want this (see attached pics): https://www.weather.gov/media/marine/rfax.pdf And there’s tons of radio fax overview and detailed info in the links at the bottom of NOAA’s Marine page (the links “Radiofax Information” and “Radiofacsimile User’s Guide”): https://www.weather.gov/marine/radiofax_charts As well —and I find this slightly confusing, another arm of NOAA, the Ocean Prediction Center (which is different from the source of the radiofax info in the links above, which are from NOAA’s National Weather Service site...) —anyway, their Ocean Prediction Center (OPC) produces these scheds of their fax broadcasts/frequencies/contents (also listed in the big PDF file, “Worldwide Marine Radiofacsimile Nroadvast Schedules”): OPC Pacific sched/frequencies: https://ocean.weather.gov/shtml/pacsch.php Atlantic: https://ocean.weather.gov/shtml/atlsch.php
  11. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Dylan's New Boat Anarchy

    Still, it’s somehow “amazing” though - doubling speed leads to an eightfold increase in fuel consumption!
  12. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Dylan's New Boat Anarchy

    I always thought diesel bugs were a warm-climate thing. I run my boat in a similar climate to yours, above 49*N latitude, have motored (mostly - little wind near-shore coastal sailing around here) to Alaska and back, and over the years, too, have never had any issues with filters clogging. But maybe because our fuel tank is in the keel, so fuel is typically quite cool - whereas tanks located in warmer ambient temps (I.e., not below water line, or in warmer, lower latitudes) are more prone to diesel bugs? I’m curious - have read about them, never had an issue. Anyone know?
  13. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Dylan's New Boat Anarchy

    Made me think of this, for some reason (question on fuel consumption for the USCG 200 tons ocean license exam). (I never realized fuel consumption is related to the cube of speed...) Sharpen your pencils :-)
  14. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    Furuno Weather Fax

    Just out of curiosity, is your question to do specifically with Furuno weatherfax, or receiving weatherfax in general from an HF radio source? (and interpreting them?)
  15. Jud - s/v Sputnik

    My season just ended, and...

    I speak from experience that having an ocean-going sailboat parked in your front yard is absolutely brutal. For eight years, doing a big refit on and off (including engine removal and rebuild). Many friends fearer for my welfare, fearing the boat would never leave our front yard. It sat there as a daily reminder —and stern motivation every time I walked by. Best to have a small boat in the water when older, and none in the yard as a brutal reminder...