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      Abbreviated rules   07/28/2017

      Underdawg did an excellent job of explaining the rules.  Here's the simplified version: Don't insinuate Pedo.  Warning and or timeout for a first offense.  PermaFlick for any subsequent offenses Don't out members.  See above for penalties.  Caveat:  if you have ever used your own real name or personal information here on the forums since, like, ever - it doesn't count and you are fair game. If you see spam posts, report it to the mods.  We do not hang out in every thread 24/7 If you see any of the above, report it to the mods by hitting the Report button in the offending post.   We do not take action for foul language, off-subject content, or abusive behavior unless it escalates to persistent stalking.  There may be times that we might warn someone or flick someone for something particularly egregious.  There is no standard, we will know it when we see it.  If you continually report things that do not fall into rules #1 or 2 above, you may very well get a timeout yourself for annoying the Mods with repeated whining.  Use your best judgement. Warnings, timeouts, suspensions and flicks are arbitrary and capricious.  Deal with it.  Welcome to anarchy.   If you are a newbie, there are unwritten rules to adhere to.  They will be explained to you soon enough.  

Vincent

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  1. What boat is that?

    Solenn 23, Construction Navale Franck Roy.
  2. Russian mega yacht trapped in Baltic Sea

    http://www.boatinternational.com/yachts/news/exclusive-sailing-yacht-a-delivery-route-revealed--31729 Usually, where and how a ship that size can go is pretty much one of the earliest things discussed in design briefs.
  3. Boss Sinking?

    Quick count: there is only 18 people in the world that achieved a podium in the Vendée (less than 3 times the number of editions). Alex Thomson is the current holder of the third best time of the race, with a design significantly older than the ones Le Cléach and Gabart had. I think his performance in the last edition did not receive the coverage it deserved. He finished less than 3 days after Gabart and Le Cléach and the followers were more than 5 days behind him (and had a bit of lead missing, but that happens). Chosing him as a skipper for a project that ambitions to be competitive clearly does not look stupid to me...
  4. Team France

    Swiss sailor of the year 2014, very high reputation on anything that has a number of hulls >1 He did some D35, M2, Extreme 40, AC45 non foiling, etc And apparently he's not too bad either when it comes to International Moth.
  5. Team UK

    Does that mean I can tell HMRC I won't be paying them anything anymore as it is funding the British campaign and I'm backing the French?
  6. Team UK

    Are you serious? There are 4 brits on the entire design team of 20+... Sponsors and partners are for sure, but there is a lot of brains coming from across the channel.
  7. Team France

    Navy has got the largest towing tanks in the country. Looking quickly at the numbers you might be able to test a 1:2 model of an AC48 in the B600
  8. Team UK

    ^PR bullshit, all this stuff applies to Catia for instance. The wing surfaces are fairly simple compared to what you can see on modern ships or yachts, and Andy Claughton blatantly knows it as it's been his job over the last decades Any parametric CAD package can offset a surface to make a tooling.
  9. Old Whitbread/Volvo Ocean Race yachts

    SFS, the former Abu Dhabi of last edition burnt down last night in Cogolin.
  10. Team Vestas grounded

    Just for info: I listened to a radio show last week with a oceanographer of the SHOM, the french navy cartographers. He explained that a lot of the surveys made pre-GPS era were still valid today in terms of data collected, but that they were just badly positionned due to uncertainty in navigation systems back then. So since the apparition of GPS and satellite images, a lot of work has been done in positionning these surveys in the right place. You tend to have less and less badly positionned rocks that effectively existed, but some miles away.
  11. I suspect the density of core required to withstand local efforts just makes the monolithic approach lighter. Or at least light enough to be worth it when you add the peace of mind of the naval architect who had to determine slamming pressures and of the builder who is responsible for all the processes that will have an influence on local failure modes.
  12. Just to put things back into perspective. Sydney Hobart wouldn't even be considered as suitable to be a qualifier to the Route du Rhum, Vendée Globe, or even the mini transat for what matters (too short). It is seen as the pinnacle of... corinthian racing or privately funded racing with some pro crew. On par with Fastnet or Middle Sea Race for instance. WOXI would be seen as a joke compared to all the multihulls developped in the last 15 years. Just to give you a rough idea, WOXI's average speed on 2012 Sydney Hobart (630 miles in a day and 18 hours) is about 14.86 knots. That's about 357 miles in 24 hours. The 24 hours distance record is at 908 (!) miles for BPV. That's right, almost three times as much. Don't even mention it's a multihull, I perfectly do know. But crewed monohulls development in France has been stopped decades ago for competitive racing. The only big monohull develoment going on is IMOCA 60 or cruiser racers. That's probably why Groupama went for Juan K instead of VPLP for the Volvo: there hasn't been a pure racing crewed monohull design project in France since Mari-Cha IV, and that was in 2003 more than a decade ago. You have to realise that what is done in Europe in terms of pro offshore racing (and associated design) is just miles away from what you can imagine in the southern hemishpere. The sydney hobart is just about the same than a leg of the figaro (+ or - 500 miles). Yes that's right: we got guys doing 4 Sydney-Hobarts, single handed, in three weeks time. And that is almost considered as a pre-requisite to move on to more high-tech circuits. I am crewing on the mediterranean maxi circuit when work gives me time. French pro sailors consider crewing on maxis as something between holidays and a good way to earn money for doing more competitive sailing on other circuits (WMRT, Figaro, IMOCA, etc). So nobody has heard of WOXI in Europe, hardly anyone has heard of the Sydney Hobart apart from people into sailing. The only reason I know about WOXI is because I'm a naval architect and I was curious to see how the DSS would improve its performance. But for the average french bloke, he can just go to Lorient or la Trinité on a week-end, where faster boats than WOXI are so common that he would have 3 or 4 dropping if he kicked in a random bin on the marina. Nobody much has heard of the French shorthanded heroes and their boats in the English-speaking world, either.* We just don't care about it, so of course the French dominate. Implying that because the French dominate shorthanded sailing they are better at ocean racing is like saying "we Aussies dominate rugby league therefore we are better at football" or "we Americans dominate NASCAR therefore we would beat you in F1". The French are great sailors, but if they are supreme then why don't they win more races in the classes that are actually popular in other places? If the Australian scene is so much less professional then why are our guys dominating the Olympics and doing so well in the AC? And as others have pointed out, what multis do is irrelevant when people are talking monohulls. Pointing out that BPV goes three times faster than WOXI is like saying that Aussie Rules football is better than (soccer) football because you score more points in a Rules game. To lots of sailors, racing is not just about pure speed. And by the way, my last offshore season was on a shorthanded tri and I've regularly criticised the supermaxi concept in posts here, no one can claim I'm biased towards WOXI. *To give one example; years ago I was in the press room at the OSTAR's finish. Four ORMA 60s were in when the local TV crew arrived. They left as soon as they found out that the masts they'd seen (the brightly coloured wings of the ORMA 60s) were not the masts of the Tall Ships Race entrants that were also due in around the same time. When the media can't tell an ORMA from a square rigger, and don't blink an eye at Cammas and co as they give interviews to an almost entirely French press gallery, it says a lot about how little people outside France care about shorthanded racing. I took the example of the French because I am, but I could probably have done the same with any european country with a decent offshore racing scene. Even the Swiss have entries in higher profile races than StH, despite living in a landlocked country. And even the Swiss highest level circuits are on multis. You are mistaking arrogance with brutal facts. Abbo's statement that StH and WOXI were the highest profile offshore race and yacht is just as funny as saying the French rule olympic sailing and the new RS aero shows how the UK is miles ahead of everyone else in skiff design. Nothing to do with being French or arrogant.
  13. It's not nationalism. I'm just taking French as an example because I'm French so i know a thing or two about the country. But I could perfectly have quoted Sam Davies saying the RB&I was a practice race... What Abbo calls lack of humility is in fact humility to admit that some people and some yachts are just not in the same league when it comes to offshore racing. I mean, I've watched the thread the whole of last weak hoping people would wake him up, unfortunately he didn't believe them. As for the new VPLP maxi, it will probably turn circles around WOXI given the track record of VPLP/Verdier and the numbers we have so far...
  14. You're not getting what I tried to explain... There is no decent similarly sized French monohull, nor Britsh, German, Spanish, Italian, Swiss or Vaticanese for what matters. Because they are just plain outdated in Europe's professional racing scene and have been for decades. It's as if you were trying to explain Formula 1 fans that a tuned Toyota is fast and that the Aussie Racing Cars championship is the pinnacle of racing. It's not, it's just not in the same world anymore. Got it?