mikewof

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About mikewof

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  1. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    Before we get deeper into this, what is your take here? It's now no longer obvious to me with what you write. It seemed before that you suggested that the only time viruses don't damage cells is when they don't enter the cells, the "subclinical" explanation you gave earlier. And then every time a virus enters a cell, it reproduces like mad and breaks the cell open with a flood of new viruses. Obviously I disagree with that, and I claimed that viruses are able to move forward and backwards through the cell wall, depending on the direction of the entropic gradient. I claim that the reason viruses usually cause no damage isn't because they can't get into the cell, but because of other genetic reasons that are far outside of my area of expertise. So Frenchie, I'm happy to shitfight with you, but I have to first know what is the debate about?
  2. mikewof

    Friday Night Massacre at U.S. Postal Service

    Bezos seems to want to acquire the pieces of the USPS that he needs; an office in every town in the country, same reason he bought Whole Foods. As for letter delivery, Amazon likely has no long term need for that. Amazon gets that subsidy because FedEx and UPS softened up USPS before Amazon come into the scene, and then Amazon is able to take that subsidy by purchasing USPS services a la cart at below market rates. Bezos seems to despise competition of any kind. As long as the USPS remains unprivatized, there will remain competition for his logistics and retail services for the companies and small businesses that rely on the USPS (and UPS). Bezos also wants to be loved, he doesn't want to appear to be the villain, and "saving" the Post Office through privatization would do that. Amazon isn't just a retailer. They are the biggest retailer, the biggest computer service provider, but they are also the biggest logistics provider. And unlike the other two, logistics offers nearly unlimited growth potential if they could eliminate some competition the day they did with retailing. Any jackdaw can do retailing, but logistics requires the widest possible infrastructure there is. It would be the 200 year guaranty of Amazon dominance. $1/box is not a golden goose for Amazon, it's an appetizer.
  3. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    You don't realize what you did there ... pneumonia comes in different flavors; viral, bacterial and infiltrate. And pneumonia absolutely does destroy lung tissue, scarring from infections or infiltrate is the result of dead tissue, it's visible on MRI and often x-ray. Pneumonia is the disease of insufficient oxygen transfer across lung tissue. How that happens can come from bacteria, virus or infiltrate. To what you wrote, here is the correct take ... Viruses sometime destroy cells, Viruses more often do not destroy cells. But we're making progress here, just a few months ago you were utterly and purely convinced that all viruses destroy all cells to which they came in contact. And you attempted to ridicule me for what you now write.
  4. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    SARS-CoV-2 is ultimately a virus. When you come up with a cite to show the frequency of SARS-CoV-2 moving through the osmotic gradient, then I'll take the effort to meet you cite-for-cite. Until then, it's sufficient to note that SARS-CoV-2 is very undeadly per infection, compared to viral infections like HIV and Hantavirus. Some 99% of the people infected with SARS-CoV-2 are no worse for it. Your explanation to how that happens is that they are subclinical infections. And SARS-CoV-2 viruses are not 100 to 125 nanometers, that's the virion. As far as I know the actual virus is about the same size as most genetic material, around 50 nanometers. The virus continues to causes rapidly increasing cases, and only linear deaths. It's infecting people, and it's not killing them. As to how that happens, just do what I do and claim ignorance. You don't know.
  5. mikewof

    Friday Night Massacre at U.S. Postal Service

    It's too easy, I can't abuse the trust of the emotionally incompetent.
  6. mikewof

    75th anniversary of a great crime

    Truman was ill-suited for the job. It's debatable if the nuclear bombings did not save lives. It's hard to see how any of this matters given our inability to produce a functional time machine in anything other than a forward time-machine in a bottle of tequila. We need to continue to disassemble the nuclear dragon. That's what's important, not Monday Morning Quarterbacking to what we should or should not have done. Just in PA in the last week, there were Australians here who essentially shit all over the NPT. I find that a far bigger worry than the variety of ways that Truman did or didn't fuck up.
  7. mikewof

    75th anniversary of a great crime

    So a shitfight is more important to you than nonproliferation? Seek help, or get over yourself. And by the way, anyone can support the Union for Concerned Scientists, you just send them money. They will accept it, that has nothing to do with "credentials" other than buying their publications or licking the closure on an envelope.
  8. mikewof

    Friday Night Massacre at U.S. Postal Service

    I get the hard-on to get rid of Trump, but the bigges story here is the United State Postal Service. It's under attack by Jeff Bezos, and Donald Trump is in this case little more than a useful idiot. Trump has done next to nothing to enable the USPS to compete on a level playing field with the 1800 lbs. grizzly bear that is Amazon. The U.S. Postal Service is one of the few remaining public infrastructures outright owned by The People. Assuming Biden makes it through in November, does not mean a field of clover for our Postal Service. We need to stop using Amazon except when it is unavoidable or for books or obscure bits things that are hard to find elsewhere. We need to let our Amazon Prime memberships lapse, and let Amazon compete for our business without the carrot-and-stick of Prime.
  9. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    It's funny when you agree with me while trying to hide that you agree with me.
  10. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    First of all, at least attempt some level of accuracy, the virus is not "COVID-19" that's the name of the illness. The virus is SARS-CoV-2. Now, to your first question, if anything "kills alnost all" of a patient's alveoli, there is nothing that can be done, other than force air into the lungs, I'm not even sure that recovery is possible, lung tissue doesn't regenerate fast enough. To your second question, you've confused the "rate" of new infections with the rate of measurement. The only way to measure the rate of new infections is to measure a given (and wide) population every week since the beginning of the pandemic. We don't do that. We just measure people as they come in, for either DNA, antibodies, or occasionally for both. Coronaviruses and rhonoviruses are some of the most virulent there are. At this point, we'll all likely become exposed to SARS-CoV-2. The infections are even taking off in the places that told the world that they beat it. So what policy should be made? I have no idea, because we have little actual actionable data. We have no shortage of data to cause a billion people to run around like headless chickens, but actionable data? I can only speak for the USA, and we have failed miserably to get decent data. Physicians are care providers, they are not scientists, for the most part. They are chin-deep in keeping people alive, and have little training or time to perform objective analysis. And yet, fucking Trump put a medical doctor in charge of this whole mess. That makes as much sense as putting a master mechanic in charge of a car's recall effort. The CDC started to comingle the COVID, pneumonia, flu and respiratory deaths, so now we have to wait until this is over to get a clue as to what happened, and the Biden/Trump election had hopelessly poisoned any chance to gather data objectively without it threatening another four years of Trump. I have my own take to what happened here, and it seems to fit what the limited data that we have, shows. But without granular data and testing on the patients and a random sampling of people, my hunch means nothing, and we'll need to wait until sometime late in 2021 to figure out what happened. So you want to know what policy to create based on incomplete, essentially useless data? I would argue that any policy created on incomplete and mostly useless data will be incomplete and mostly useless policy.
  11. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    You're confused. This might help ... https://www.webmd.com/lung/covid-and-pneumonia Many doctors consider COVID a type of pneumonia. So, what caused the pneumonia? The SARS-CoV-2 virus alone? A co-occurring infection? Regular, non-SARS pneumonia is the biggest killer of children in the world. SARS-CoV-2 impacts children the least of any age group. So now, how do you know which infections caused the.pneumonia?
  12. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    Dumbass, now you're getting it. Most viruses are harmless. But not necessarily because they don't get into the cells. So stepping back a few months ... viruses don't always kill cells, the vast majority do not kill cells.
  13. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    You should read more carefully. This is not "by the CDC." As the article states, it's an analysis from a newspaper reporter, who has access to the identical CDC data that the rest of us have. And given that the CDC started grouping flu deaths, pneumonia deaths and respiratory deaths in with the COVID deaths, there is no way to determine excess deaths until next year using public data.
  14. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    The idea that all viruses inhabit cells and then explode them from the inside out with an avalanche of new viruses is likely the "wild conjecture." When we see the animation of that on the all-day COVID television special, it's an artist's abstraction for the viewing public. And the idea that a 5 micron human cell can successfully keep out 50 nanometer virions is not realistic. It's like suggesting that a chicken wire fence can keep out a dust storm. It's off that we're even debating that. Most viruses are harmless to most cells. That's established. The suggestion that most are harmless because most of them never make it past the cell wall is unsupported gobbledygook.
  15. mikewof

    One month after opening, Covid 19 spiking

    The SARS-CoV-2 is still just a virus, it doesn't do anything magical that all the other viruses don't do. But some viruses are more dangerous than others. You concluded that the reason some viruses cause so little harm (like the SARS-CoV-2 virus compared to say the much more lethal Hantavirus or SARS-CoV or HIV) is because the infection is subclinical. You can't make conclusions like that without measurement. And right now, the two measurements that we have (DNA and antibodies) measure the very thing that is the result of the infection, and which is nonlethal in 99.5% of all infections. So how in the world do "we know" that it is subclinical like you write?