paularsen1

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  1. paularsen1

    A Cat Worlds Sopot

    A little bit of local content from Sopot... https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2RejMpWWHRiR0wwZDN6WWxyQTg/view?usp=drivesdk I hope the link works:) Should be more detailed interviews and techy boat bits to come. The players are starting to arrive and new boats are coming in from the Exploder factory every day. A solid storm blew through last night and tested the marquis and the beach ground supports.
  2. paularsen1

    Sailrocket 3 - The Offshore version

    No, neither of those. There's still a few vids of some of the first boats hairier moments that we haven't posted. I guess all this belongs in another thread really. Posting a video of a boat running up a beach at speed is about as un-"off-shore" as it gets!
  3. paularsen1

    Sailrocket 3 - The Offshore version

    19 knots Pfhhhh... We parked the first one at nearly twice that... and then came out and broke our first world record a few runs later ... new foil and underpants though;) Got a great video of it here somewhere.
  4. paularsen1

    Sailrocket 3 - The Offshore version

    Hi SAists, well if it's any consolation... I feel like I'm letting you down by not doing any updates. It's not like I haven't written a few... and then scrubbed them before posting. The trouble is that we are looking at a whole different ball game now. With speed sailing we weren't really threatening anyone. Whilst we were in competition with others chasing the same record, no one else really saw us as crossing into their 'ponds'. Nice trick... but business as usual. Well the next boat is different. If there is one thing I am sure of it is that if our ideas are as good as we think they are... then there are others who would take them, modify them and, even if we were given some credit, claim them as their own. Once you hear the catchy tune... it usually seems so simple and obvious. I do find this position very frustrating. If I was to show you a little, I would have to show you the lot. The concepts don't make sense without the full explanation of the compromises and solutions to the various design loops we have been through. Every criticism you would make would be justified as we have already made it ourselves. It's only when you see the whole picture that it makes sense. Obviously we think we have come up with something that is better than what exists and obviously there are many well established industries feeding off 'what exists'. We need to respect that aspect. I greatly value sharing SR3 with people outside the inner circle. I love honest feedback. On the few occasions I have done it, it quickly became apparent that it was a lot of information to take in. Too much. We needed better tools by which to share our ideas. That is what I have been working on. Scale models, renders, VPP's and now animations. These are invaluable. Whilst I have clear pictures in my own head, others don't. Once these 'tools' are finished then we will use them to try and find partners who want to really take on a fascinating sailing challenge... not just pay lip service to innovation and do something a little different than what has been before. There is just so much unexplored territory with the forces of wind and water. I'm not interested in class rules or WSSRC restrictions. The gloves are off in that respect. I find aviation design and development much more inspiring than what has happened in sailing and yet I remain fascinated about the difficulties surrounding our unique environment. When we took on Sailrocket 2, I chose to look at 65 knots and design backwards from there i.e. Whats the worst performance we could expect from a foil that could actually still work at that speed? Once we settled on that horribly draggy number, we designed the boat that could drag it at 65 knots in the conditions we knew we would encounter in Namibia. With SR3 I have always said that I wanted to take what we have learnt and make it practical. Just designing a one tack trans-Atlantic record smashing boat would be, let's face it, a shit load of fun... but that's all. It actually wouldn't be that hard (besides the usual difficulties with any larger scale project). I've spent a lot of time pondering what would be a much more worthwhile challenge. For me it would be to design a sailing boat that could possibly make sailing viable on commercial craft again. To do that you need to break away convention. If you were to look at some basic parameters that would make sailing craft viable again I think that efficient speed, cost of manufacture/running and ability to carry payload would be the holy grail. The third one is a 'biggy'. Like with 65 knots, I am trying to work backwards from fulfilling ALL those parameters to a high degree (not just "pick any two"). There are potential markets out there that don't exist now simply because the craft that would enable them don't exist. Maybe if they did... and new industries blossomed, sailing would become truly relevant again. Who knows? All I know is that the concepts we are working on can do some pretty cool things that even I wasn't considering before we began exploring new paths. It always amazes how your accidents can often lead to your breakthroughs. So right now, I'll be honest with you, this stage of the project consists of me working obsessively in a windowless loft on all aspects of SR3 from design, to rendering and model building on a few grand left over from the SR2 'fighting fund'. I run my ideas and concepts through Malcolm and Chris to get their valued thoughts and realistic numbers assigned to them so we can check the VPP's to make sure we are on track. The numbers are good. There are no sponsors and although we have approached a couple, the nature of the proposal has already changed (for the better). It's actually very nice to be going through this almost artistic phase without any outside pressures. I am very happy with how things are progressing and the potential of the concept fills me with excitement. I have to contain that excitement so that I can see when things are wrong with clear eyes. That is why it is good to share it with fresh eyes occasionally. This stage cannot go on forever though. We will sail the next scale model of the concept in the next month and see if it supports our theories and how they developed from the first model. Next year we need to find partners to scale it all up. There is no doubt that whilst our success with speed sailing perhaps still left us in the 'freaks' category, it did give us the credibility chip. It showed we have a proven feel for the compromises that enabled us to turn a unique vision into reality (on very little resource). I think we will only be given one real chance to use that chip so please forgive us for not being so open with SR3. I hope we do find the right partners to share the journey with so we can put it out there. I hope, as much for their sake, that we find them soon. The time is right for this next boat and this part of the development is a fascinating stage to be part of i.e. the last version I drew had 100 seats in it. Cheers, Paul
  5. paularsen1

    Sailrocket 3 - The Offshore version

    Hi all, apologies for keeping you in suspense. An update is long overdue. I can only assure you that it is not due to lack of activity. I'm as obsessed with this boat as I ever was with the previous two. The challenge of developing and designing an offshore concept that is just all-round 'better' has been a fascinating one. The answers aren't obvious and often not we are conditioned to look for. Some of the biggest discoveries come by accident. If I look at our first proposals for the concept from a year ago, they have changed quite a lot from what I would write now. Things have become far more interesting. I remain as healthily sceptical as ever and like to truly convince myself first before blurting things out. That said, I promise a much lengthier update on the 24th of November (our own little anniversary day). On another front, things are on the move. SR2 has left the building and the fastest sailing boat currently afloat on the North Atlantic isn't a trimaran... perhaps that's a sign of what's to come. I hope we can reward your patience.
  6. paularsen1

    Sailrocket 3 - The Offshore version

    Sitting down in Toy-town, Lorient at the end of a fine line of thoroughbred multihulls all getting Rhum'd up. Very inspiring. I'm constantly picturing in my doing the dimensional maths and trying to picture what a big SR3 would look like amongst these pigeons. I'm not even sure how it would fit in here. They have done a great job with this base. When I first came here 15 years ago I had to show my passport. We will keep quiet on many of the key design principles of SR3. Whilst it is tempting and too easy to just throw it out 'there', I feel it's better to follow a process where we allow the designs to grow without the pressure of public scrutiny. The concept will grow as we dig deeper into the studies and things will change so that by the time we start to build, as with SR2, you can be sure that it is well considered. It will be worth the wait. Cheers, Paul
  7. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Hi Anarchists... well here's that thing you've been waiting for. And the blog about it is up too. I hope the wait was worth it. Enjoy.
  8. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Hey all, We are working as quick as our small team can to share this with you via video and the like. It's a constant job just to make my e-mail list go down rather than up. It's a bloody big job to make these videos. The new cameras generate such massive files and the pro cameras Ben is shooting on still use tape so all the footage has to be digitised and stored for editing. All this means we have 3 1 terabyte hard drives feeding into one smoking Mac laptop. Ben is a pro at this and is working 24 hours a day on it. Whilst his computer is crunching footage... he's outside setting up interviews and sharing imagery with media. I'm so glad we focused on bringing someone of his capabilities down here. I've decided that I'm done for this session. It's Helenas turn... but the forecast looks dead flat from here on in. It might change. We will be on a plane in 8 days. I'm not even sure if we should ship the boat back or not. I'm sure this boat can see the other side of 70. The only reason she stopped going quicker was because the leeward side of the boat was flying too high. The way we resolve that is to stand the rig up some more. This gives both power and stability. It's all good. In theory we should be maxxing out the foil... but it's how it behaves when it starts reaching its limits that is interesting. The boat and the concept it is based on has so much power to drag stuff down the course that it's alarming. That was the design goal of this boat..."let's not simply focus on the foil... let's build the platform that will give ANY FOIL the best possible chance of hitting its limits... then we will worry about the foil". I think we have seen this power played out by the fact that the boat has dragged every 'shape' and size we have put on it down the course at over 52 knots. To go faster we can add more power i.e. sail in more wind OR reduce drag... or both. There are other foil concepts that are worth exploring. We chose this one as we considered it to be the safe option. I'm so happy with how the team performed last saturday. We took on the big day with a view to winning... not just competing. Mother nature delivered us one hour of perfection for this whole 28 day record attempt. The other days were good... but for 1 hour it was strong and rock steady... 28,29,29,29,29,28,29,27,27,29.... Helena was just reading out the same numbers over the VHF. Industrial Walvis Bay wind. It has been mentioned that we had one from being the hunter to the hunted... I sort of played along... but a little deeper down I knew we still had a job to be finished. When we knocked Rob off the top spot we had topped their leader... now we were coming back to wipe the village out. We did three runs that day. The first two didn't quite go right. We topped over 61 knots on the first two but just didn't get the average. We wanted to finish it once and for all and by the third run we were hungry to tear it apart. It started badly but we recovered and got onto the course. I was checking for damage as we accelerated through 60 knots but the speed was epic so I knew I had to keep the hammers down. This was it. Anyway, it's time to write the blog properly so I'll finish it there. If we had have missed that hour and not got started... that would have been it. 59.38 would be the mark. I believe that the kiters can beat this. I don't think they will get near 65.45 with what they have now. If any of the kiters can actually pull off a 60 knot run it will be super impressive and we won't feel so untouchable. The thing is that we are not at our limits. This boat will see the other side of 70 oneday. It nearly did the other day. It's awake now and it's still hunting. You have to consider that at some early stage of the design process we had the discussion "What limits are we designing for"? We set a speed as the Vne for the craft but even that has safety margins. The answer to that question is the big one. that's our secret. The concept still doesn't even have a name. Bernard Smith used to call them Aero-Hydrofoils but I personally don't feel that quite explains it. Homage must be paid to that wonderful guy some way or another. Right, so the video is coming. Some of the angles we have captured are fantastic. I can't wait to see it myself. I called our local Champagne dealer yesterday morning... She answered with "F**k off" and hung up. That's a sign that things are going well
  9. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Hey anarchists... fresh off the TRIMBLE... 65.45 average 68.01 knots for 1 second. I am... speechless. Performance sailing has entered a new era. We did battle with speed-spot today and we came away friends. I could walk away from speedsailing today and say "job done". Tomorrow... well, I'll worry about that then. This is a special time.I'm glad we shared it here. Cheers, from us to you.
  10. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Hi all... well I'll burn up some of my nervous energy here for a moment. Today is building into a big day. There has been some interesting points raised that do need answering. For us it was pretty simple what we were aiming to do with this boat. Simply we were aiming to see how fast you can go using wind and water. We chose this Bernard Smith based concept for the performance it could deliver with a focus on power and stability at the edge. Of course we could make a tacking version... but practicality is not the focus. We only have to go one way over 500 meters to show some form af stability and directional control. The reason we only have to go one way as against a cars record is because we are obviously wind powered... whereas they can't have any wind 'assist. In a funny way, VSR2 is actually a very practical boat. It can be sailed with 3 people. We can have it out of the tent and rigged quicker than a Hobie 16 (mast down). It's a pretty sorted boat in that respect. If we were to have started with a daysailor version... not many people would have understood the possibilities of the concept. If, on the other hand, we go out and do it now, after setting an outright world record, then people will pay a lot more attention. The concept is proven beyond doubt. Once again, our focus was getting the record and we believed that this was the best means of stability and control available. Bernard Smiths concepts are now firmly on everyones radar. Full credit to a very deserved man. As another note... to be fair, I believe that the kite and wind surfers get driven to the top of the course after a run in Luderitz. I have no problem with that. I know that they too could technically sail back up as we too could technically build a tacking version of VSR2 (which would look super cool with twin inward inclined rigs and a simple vertical central board). The outright record is simple and pure. It allows you to focus on pushing the limits of wind and water. What people take from these newly illuminated limits will be of great interest to us. It would be interesting to still have a record which requires you to sail in both directions... but I'm afraid this would only exaggerate the advantages of a Bernard Smith style boat which does its best on a beam reach. Our next boat will be a bit more practical... and you will know without doubt where we are coming from. A lot has to happen between now and then i.e. survive today. Cheers, Larso.
  11. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Just to be double sure... damnit ... everyone else is in MUSTO drysuits now except me! Oh well... it might be Helena's turn to ride today. She's gone a bit quiet back there.
  12. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    VESTAS SAILROCKET MAGIC MILE VIDEO...
  13. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Righto Anarchists... strap in... Here is the magical mile video. Top speed 64.78 knots. The wind is blowing and we are heading out again. VESTAS Sailrocket 2... The magical mile Some of you have contacted VESTAS and thanked them for supporting us. It means a lot to them and us. We had the faith and passion and they backed it all the way. We owe a lot to our sponsors. These are tough times and I hope that our success has come at a good time for them. Thanks. Paul.
  14. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Hi Clean, we have just uploaded a Hi res version... for some reason I haven't got your e-mail address. Send it to me and I will send you the link for the FTP. paularsen1@aol.com
  15. paularsen1

    Vestas Sailrocket

    Hi all, we are onto editing up the video from the nautical mile. I just laugh every time I think of that run. It was a spur of the moment decision to have a shot at it. It just all came together. I ah... remembered to turn the helmet camera on for this one so you will see down the pipe. We peaked at 64.78 knots (74.55 mph). I think its exactly 120 kph. You know records are going to fall when your hitting that down the nautical mile. The average wind was 24.4 knots. The last couple of days have been hectic but amongst it all we have to remind ourselves that it isn't over yet and the boat comes first. Yesterday we pulled the boat and wing apart and checked all the 'killer' bits. If the wing blows apart that's not life threatening. If the forward beam shroud lets go... that's another story. Overall the boat is in great shape but she does need a constant eye. I did get a piece sent to me about Rob Douglas' opinion of the record falling. He's always struck me as a very level headed guy... and obviously a driven competitor. Whilst I think we all have genuine good will towards each other, I know what burns just under the surface. Nothing is more motivating than being beaten and we kicked a hornets nest there. I already feel protective of this one. I don't yet feel it's safe. We need to go faster. The next big day on the forecast is Saturday. For all we know now that might be all we get so we had better be ready to exploit it. Yeah that nautical mile run was just perfect. After putting a hard 10 years into this dream... after that run I consider that speed sailing and I are now 'square'. Everything else now is a bonus. Ben is buried in his editing suite up the back going for it with the next video. This small team is doing a great job.