crashdog

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About crashdog

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  1. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    Well, chess is about brinksmanship and power. Go is about patience and process. Parliament is playing go and boris is pretending to play chess with draughts pieces. They move a draught diagonally and discover that they are surrounded by black stones. Its painful to watch, honestly. I do not understand why there isn't more noise about how seriously broken this all is. When I take friends (including leavers) through the various technical arguments against the brexit process (not even getting into outcomes or impacts), I universally get a "hmmm I didn't know that, that changes things" response. But the so called media is not doing any of this work. The voices in the wilderness - e.g. Ivan Rogers - have been speaking about this stuff for years. Why aren't the people of England listening? And why isn't the opposition acting on this. Something in the water? Lead pipes? Mercury laced dyes? Surely not BSE...
  2. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    Alpha, I agree with you on the labour side - a well played judo move by them to demonstrate that tories were not ever serious about a balanced brexit. The move pushes the conservatives off the centre on the topic, pushing them away from the majority that does not support no-deal. This allows labour to occupy the space by themselves since liberals / snp are solidly in remain (although I believe that snp would support a soft brexit if it gave them an independence vote)
  3. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    Sorry for the late reply... Actually, this is quite wrong, and there have been a number of court cases directly on the matter of Brexit that have established that it is Parliament that has sovereignty. While all the rest of the noise about the mendacity of the various referendum campaigns can be set aside (although perhaps they shouldn't, given the basic ethical assumptions of democracy), it is very clear that the early move of government to move forward with an Article 50 without parliament was in breach of the sovereignty of parliament. While not the first and certainly not the last dirty trick of the Conservative government, it was certainly a significant one. The court was clear about the fallacy of the position of the government. The only time Parliament gives up sovereignty is in an election, and that, only for the very brief and specific purpose. The government, pursuing a strategy to deliver the results of a referendum, is not acting as sovereign. It is, at best, acting in the service of parliament to move forward a strategy that parliament will ratify. Because the strategy is not in line with what can be approved by parliament, the whole strategy is flawed. So what should be done? A new parliament could, perhaps, get behind a no-deal or a limited deal exit. But that would require a general election. And who knows how that would go. There is more in the world than just Brexit to consider. Or, perhaps, a new strategy - e.g. replace government. Which requires a vote of no confidence. Which has the likelihood of installing a Labour government. I actually believe Corbyn when he says he would act properly in a caretaker role. It is the rest of his posse that is more problematic, and who may just remain in power using their own dirty tricks. And then the strategy would still not be working in the interest of the country. This whole brexit thing could turn the UK into a federated kingdom. Which would probably be a good thing, as it would finally start to repair the centuries of imbalance that the old kingdom relied on to maintain its primacy. Good riddance to all that.
  4. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    Sorry, I didn't catch that, Jack. Which part didn't he think through?
  5. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    well, its a deal. And most importantly, has a democratic process in the middle of it that allows North Ireland its own sovereignty. I think it is a good solution, on the balance of specific needs in Ireland / North Ireland. Ultimately, it will break the UK, but the whole Brexit enterprise had a significant risk of doing just that. In setting the risk framework, the UK powers felt that their independence was more important than the union, that the risk of being left behind in the EU was greater than proceeding as a rump union of London and the home counties. Is it a foolish proposition? Yes, of course. England will be much worse off, if the quality of the gang that pushed this particular brexit is indicative of what will come next once they step into the wider world of international trade. I can't believe that the UK allowed this to happen, but as has been mentioned often in this thread, you get what you deserve. The best and brightest in the UK will leave, and the Ireland backdoor has created a wonderfully easy mechanism. It is a huge win for Ireland, and a terrible result for the UK. But it is a deal. I'd vote for it. Because it will result in a free Ireland, finally. Because it will likely result in a free Scotland. And it is time enough for the imperial tunes of England and the pith helmeted thin red line to fade away into the pebroch of gaelic pipes.
  6. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    IT was the obvious counter offer on the NIP 1.1 veto. There was a fair amount of Conservative Party koolaid in the Ruparel piece, but the idea that the border needs to be moved to the NI Ports is sound. Much like the structures contemplated in the GFA, there needs to be dual structures at the periphery of North Ireland to enable ongoing peaceful choices to be made in the future. The very principle of the GFA is to grant time for the people to make choices to correct significant historical problems. Why would there be an expectation that a brexit like event would not need to follow the same principle. Someone needs to change out the 10W bulb of brexit. I know English education is not really up to snuff, generally, but the level of thinking in this is very weak...
  7. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    Well IP, I think generally you are right, as much as I hate it. I said upthread, some time ago, that the only solution was to put the customary border checks at the North Ireland ports (sea / air) and that this was the handwave that UK Gov was eventually going to get to. As to the regulatory alignment, well that was another matter. It is a necessity, and much of the critical alignment exists at this point if the ports can be fixed, which allows the alignment to continue for as long as necessary. Where BJ messed it up was in the veto, which I suspect was put in as a distraction, a negotiating ploy. It has already been offered up. What I really don't understand is why it has taken so long to get there. Renaming protocols with waffle is SOP in international law. I am not sure if such a dodge to replace the "backstop" structure could have passed the HoC early in BJ's gov't but guaranteed, he has set conditions since his early days to ensure that it cannot pass now. Definitely brick for brains at work in #10. Of course, the next prime minister will do just what is being suggested by you and others - call the red line a temporary zebra crossing, leave the temporary part in the hands of North Ireland and Republic of Ireland (positive rather than negative control) and hey presto. But - Scotland may demand a similar hey presto, but there are 35 disciplined votes for the swing, with the tradeoff being some sort of sovereignty association referendum. Now, about that sticky stormont situation...
  8. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    I particularly like that advert in the daily telegraph that promotes Boris as the tap that does them all...
  9. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    IP gave a good description of privilege. The cabinet is the mind of the Government and so is entitled to accessing the law in confidence. Cox's legal analysis is privileged for a very good reason, and Gov't has the right to the same level of confidentiality that any of us is in respect of how we come to decisions. That Cox did not adequately predict what the Supreme Court might decide in this case speaks more to his abilities than it does to anything else. We have seen the results of this, ahem, capacity before and so it is not a surprise. He is a blustery fellow, though, would be quite exciting to watch a television show about such a character...
  10. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    Leo, I think the kipper finally exploded its pillow...
  11. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    OK, I feel a little better about Blighty now. It is heartening to know that justice can engage on the question of competent action. I am enjoying reading the structure of the judgement . This will have a long term effect on royal prerogative, which is an area of constitution which has been troubled. While not entirely surprised by the judgement, I am surprised by the unanimity. Of course, who know what the effect of this will be on the gang...
  12. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    Yes, well, democracy is a very broad brush. This piece, Deplorables, reflects the worst on all sides. The hardening of discourse is at the core of all of this. But democracy is not an end, or even a grounds, for public engagement. Democracy, like any tool, reflects the user. A sledge hammer is maybe not so great as a mechanism for brain surgery. The piece merely plays to the tool, unfortunately, and not to the grounds for using the tool. Just for fun, maybe consider Dworkin on rights (taking rights seriously) to look at the underlying mechanisms of dispute and of the management of conflict. Populism, schmopulism - its all tribal. Isn't it fun sinking back into our pongid past?
  13. crashdog

    What's Your Go-To Cocktail and How Do You Make It?

    The boat drink is negroni. Something about channelling Orson Welles and being able to say "green grace, where we serve no wine ... at all", while handing up that perfect dark red bomb makes me very happy. We use gin that has licorice / anise, aperol as noted, and the antico formula for vermouth. On occasion, spritzed with a cremant into a form of americano, we can pretend that we are true heavyweights. I have to say, though, that the gin fizz is also a favourite, making our own lemon peel infusion to capture that perfect aromatic sweetness of lemon oil. Never use citrus juice - that's pucker nasty...
  14. crashdog

    Eight Bells Mark Lindsay

    I was thinking of selling the ML, but that idea just went out with the trash. Very good man, that Mark.
  15. crashdog

    Brexit, WTF

    The rumoured appointment of Phil Hogan to Trade Negotiator is interesting. Besides being even more of a giant towering over BloJoSlo (I swear he was standing on an apple box at the podium during his press appointment with LV), he has very little patience for English shenanigans. The EU is playing a very good game of Go, the UK is playing at Draughts or maybe straight up kick the can, I dunno.