DDW

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About DDW

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  1. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    It's water in the common rail systems that is bad for them. And getting worse. Many of the larger common rail engines use the Bosch CP4 pump, and have Bosch piezo injectors. In the US, all three major truck brands sell millions of these, engines manufactured by 3 different companies, but all using the same basic pumps and injectors. All of them having problems. The low sulfur fuel has low lubricity, so additives that improve lubricity are good (biodiesel is one such). But additives that emulsify fuel so that it passes through the filters designed to stop water will void your warrantee on these engines. Boat engines are a bit behind in technology, I think the one in my powerboat still uses the CP3 pump, this was less sensitive to water issues but still had some. On my Ford truck (Ford built Scorpion 6.7L) there have been fuel system failures, basically either the pump grenades and showers the system with metal shavings, or the injectors pack up. Ford will test the fuel they find in the system before allowing warrantee repair. Any water, emulsifying, or dispersing agents and they disallow. The repair cost is about $12K, replace the whole fuel system. It's common enough that there is a Ford pn for the kit of parts to do it. Good old mechanical injection, sure just add some alcohol to dissolve the water into the fuel and burn it.
  2. I believe you are misinterpreting this. A paracleat is a cleat with two non-functional or amputated horns. It's as useless as a bull rail.
  3. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    Additives that emulsify water and other contaminants used to work on mechanically injected diesels. Not a great idea on common rail diesels as it allows them to pass through the water separation filters and into the 30,000 psi common rail system where they can do significant damage.That is why most of the owners manuals have admonitions against those additives. I'd try that on someone else's engine first.
  4. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    Then there was no reason for larger holes in the baffles. Common sense after all. Tanks in a power boat are a lot less likely to allow this, tanks are much bigger and located where ports would have no access. Common sense then dictates larger holes in the baffles.
  5. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    You are right that if there is no access, there is no access. The baffles I've seen have the corners cut off, leaving a triangle in each corner that was plenty big enough to get a nozzle through. You aren't trying to prevent transfer between sections, only sloshing, and that allows pretty large openings. You can have very large openings at the top of the tank with no effect on sloshing. I don't know what these tanks look like till I get inside, a picture of a sistership shows the baffle welds stopping at least 6" short of the corners. I'll stipulate that if the tanks were made with no thought at all, there's a chance they made them very difficult to clean. Best external evidence of this would be no clean out access ports (these have two each). But certainly a tank can be made that is easy to clean, and it requires only the slightest bit of common sense. If I had 20 tanks open that looked like that, first thing I would do is fix them by drilling a 3" hole at the top of each baffle in a line and inline with the access port.
  6. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    How do they get it to play the catchy tune while it spins? That is the sort of thing you need to do what Moon says is impossible. Needs a fair amount of pressure to work well, but its not complicated and can be snaked though fairly small opening in baffles. Company I was talking too has similar equipment.
  7. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    Don't know how they charge their time, as I said the quote suggests that rate. It was an estimate for the job along with an estimate of time required. They are based in Nanaimo, so a bit of a drive to Sidney. Not that hard to put together a pump and some sprayers, but the filtration stuff is bulky and hard to store. I'd have to store it on the boat as the boat is far from home.
  8. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    With proper equipment - and it would be elaborate and expensive equipment - even that absurd example is possible. But of course a tank with 3 baffles isn't nearly as challenging. Now I believe these companies present what they do in the best possible terms, like most companies selling a service, and like most companies, probably fall somewhere short of the pitch in a large number of cases. So instead, should the sludge be allowed to build up until the boat sinks, or the tank capacity is reduced to zero? Just curious as to your approach. It is quite possible to clean a tank from the inspection port. I know because I have done it. I know I have done it because I have cut the tank apart afterwards and looked. In another case inspected every corner with a remote camera. If you are looking for an existence proof, there it is.
  9. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    Well I got a quote that suggests the rate is $275/hr. Seems kinda high, even if it is play (Canadian) money. I think I'll have a poke around inside before I commit to much of that. I could do the shade tree thing: transfer all the fuel to one tank, leaving the other empty. Put some solvent like methanol in it. Drive the boat across the Rosario or Haro a couple of times on a nice wind against the tide day. Drain. Rinse and repeat on the other side. It'd probably clean my stomach too.
  10. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    Since Anomaly was custom built, I was able to design the fuel tanks myself. They have a definite low point, and a small sump at the low point that is lower than the bottom of the tank. This gives a place for water and sediment to collect as it all tends to go downhill. There is a large plug directly over this, allowing inserting a dip tube and sucking the contents of the sump with a vacuum oil change pump. The dip tube serving the engine ends at the bottom of the tank also over the sump, insuring that the tank can be completely used (except for about a pint in the sump), without sucking the nastiest bits which are in the sump. That added very little to the price of the tanks - just another place where a very slight effort up front can make life so much easier down the road. The power boat has large, long, flat bottomed tanks: no low point, no sump, no way to remove without destroying either the tanks or boat or both. I think the Volvo in the sailboat returns a small volume of spill fuel from the injectors. The 380 hp Cummins on the other hand is common rail, the specs say it pumps 50 gallons an hour and at full chat uses 19 of those....
  11. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    What you might be able to do, and what is possible for others, are two different things. Almost any tank is fully inspectable with cameras. Almost any tank is fully cleanable with the right equipment. "They" may or may not have the equipment and skill to do it, which is what I will discuss with them before money changes hands. If the boat were closer to home, I'd assemble the equipment and do it myself. WHK, cleaning the tanks is the goal, if diesel is used to do that then it should be polished as the sludge will be driven into suspension. In cleaning tanks myself in the past, I've discovered than methanol or ethanol works much better than diesel, kerosene, or even stoddard solvent to cut diesel sludge. It has the advantage over some other choices in that if it cannot all be drained from the tank, diesels are quite tolerant of burning it up to 10% or so mix. You do not want to leave it in the system very long, as it can attack the rubber and plastic parts.
  12. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    What you are saying is if they do a shitty job, I'll get a shitty result. That shouldn't be a surprise. It depends entirely on the method used. There are methods that will leave the tank clean. The reason I'm trying to contact them is to find out what their methods are.
  13. DDW

    Fuel polishing in Van Isle

    Well I spoke too soon on Fueltration. Their toll free number only works from inside Canada. From outside, its disconnected. Got the local number, will try that tomorrow. I cleaned the inside of a Triumph tank once by putting a couple of pounds of BBs in there and shaking it for an hour. Worked pretty good. Jack, just get a stainless magnet.
  14. DDW

    Reducing Anchor Swinging

    True. I anchored right next to Ranger at Martha's Vinyard. She didn't swing at anchor at all.
  15. Oh they have an odor alright - kind of like....bull rails......