usa7776

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  1. usa7776

    Double-handed medium performance dinghys for adults

    Albacore is a really nice boat for adults. It can be rigged in a simple fashion or complex. They are very evenly matched across boat age and weight range. I raced a non cored flexible flyer and could compete very well against teams w much better boats. I also tended to sail around 400lbs combined and had little issues in light air when the bulk of the fleet probably sailed 50 lbs lighter. Generally, I could get to the windward mark w the best of them and would pay about a 3-5 boat length penalty on the dead down wind. It is responsive yet forgiving. Very nice people to be on the race course with. Not expensive to race compared to boats with spinnakers. Roll tacks really well. decent boat to take kids on too.
  2. Rod, I am sorry but I don't have any more info that I know of. Just some vague mentions of the boats that were built. My dad passed away a few years ago. This thread has been fun, showing me something I have never seen. I saw from digging a bit that the mariners Museum in VA has one of these boats. They are just a few miles from my office, I contacted them and they said the boat is in storage, but offered to make arrangements for me to see it sometime. A great opportunity to for me to see a piece of family history I never thought I would. Thanks, Jim Englert
  3. ....and thanks for the info. Much appreciated.
  4. ...My dad told me my grandfather built a couple I-14's out of Syracuse, NY in the 30's. Looking at the some of the pictures, I remember we had one of those hand cranks for the sails in our garage. They were/are beautiful boats. When I was around 16(mid 80's) I joked and said we needed to find the boat that goes w the crank. About 2 months later, I had an old kirby 5 I14(USA 890??). Was a fun boat. It needed a bunch of work, actually made $400.00 of the thing when I sold it. LOL. You must be talking about Englert boatworks... who, with his brother Clarence, had been building a batch of 1930's 14's for George Ford of Rochester Fleet 1. George went through a few builders on the East Coast who would take on the project then realize that the boats were too time consuming to build that they made zero profit. They were replicating the techniques of Uffa Fox in the UK but that required hammering about 7000 copper rivets into many many frames. US builders decided no more and a more simple boat was made using molded plywood known as the One Design - see US 360. US 34 is a Englert boat. These boats cost big money back in the day. The top and bottom photos in post #1 is an unidentified build we are currently trying to track down. Could be an NY boat, could be Canadian or possibly the first California (Eichanlaub) build. Sails are stamped by Ratsey and Lapthorne from 1939 and it shares many components and traits of the NY 30's boats. That's all we have so for. yes, I am an Englert. Never knew my grandfather, but my dad told be a bit and yes, he said they did not make any money on them.
  5. ...My dad told me my grandfather built a couple I-14's out of Syracuse, NY in the 30's. Looking at the some of the pictures, I remember we had one of those hand cranks for the sails in our garage. They were/are beautiful boats. When I was around 16(mid 80's) I joked and said we needed to find the boat that goes w the crank. About 2 months later, I had an old kirby 5 I14(USA 890??). Was a fun boat. It needed a bunch of work, actually made $400.00 of the thing when I sold it. LOL.
  6. The new TP52 required safety gear. ...safe boating is no accident...
  7. usa7776

    DC Designs

    Nice job on the site. Clean design and it works.
  8. usa7776

    DC Designs

    On a slightly different theoretical topic, I have always thought it would be really cool for a development class to make a part of it's class rules that a design be made available/published to the class. I think in classes where the builders do the designing it would not be so great, but in classes where the sailors are doing a good chunk of the development, I think it would be great. I have also thought it would be cool if such class got behind a cad package that at least had a cheap or free community version so people could easily share these theoretical ideas in a more concrete way. delftship comes to mind as one that could come close to supporting that. With 3d milling getting faster and cheaper, I think we are not far from from it being feasible to having a plug or a mold milled for small runs. A consistent modeling package is a key enabler for something like that. I think there would be a big savings if people could share cad models even eventually convey complete rigging ideas within a cad model.
  9. usa7776

    DC Designs

    Alright, since the topic shifted to fun, I sure like see build photos over the heavy theory. Especially when the photos go all the way to a sailing boat and there is a narrative about the process. That was something the US Canoe site had when it was up that I miss. ...I know, there are probably a ton of people who wouldn't think that is fun either.
  10. usa7776

    DC Designs

    yes I agree. All this Theory makes it seem like you need to be a rocket scientists before getting into the canoe. I look forward to the DC settling down a bit. For me I would have to wait. I couldn't afford to build a boat, only to find it is second or third string, no matter who sails it.
  11. usa7776

    DC Designs

    That looks really cool. I would think one wide seat that both sit on would be better then the two seats.
  12. usa7776

    DC Designs

    Just put dual carbon wheels on it and call it a day
  13. usa7776

    DC Designs

    how much for the plans, jig and part files? what would the estimated cost of a hull & seat be? The design looks good. Do you have a recommended layup schedule?