miloman

Members
  • Content Count

    235
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral

About miloman

  • Rank
    Anarchist

Recent Profile Visitors

2,672 profile views
  1. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    I think that's the Bob Stephens designed Goshawk. Built by Brooklin Boat Yard and Rockport Marine in 2005. She used to be painted dark blue. I'm not sure I find the white paint job quite as flattering. http://stephenswaring.com/yachts/goshawk/
  2. miloman

    Micro-Cruiser Anarchy

    Micro-cruisers are fascinating. I like Eric Henseval's Souriceau, quite a bit. A lot of boat for it's length.
  3. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    Speaking of cool double enders, how about the Payne-Mortlock Sailing Canoes?
  4. I hate attempts at using economics to justify yachting. It's true that big yachts coming to towns can stimulate the economy, but it's hardly an efficient stimulus plan. If you must think about it from an economic standpoint, a big yacht represent an immense concentration of wealth. The same money spent by a lot of people on a bunch of smaller yachts would probably result in far greater stimulus, spread around more evenly (and in less ritzy places). But ultimately, that's not what yachting, big or small, is about. I can't put it any better than Bill Garden. In Yacht Designs he writes: Whether they are sail or power, we must remember that our yachts are toy boats — all yachts are the glint of a lovely brief bubble of time, a time of leisure and affluence for the middle class. A boat’s importance as an escape from reality, as a change of pace, as a theme for reflection, and as an art form gives it worth or value. Boats the size Bäden aren't really for the middle class, but I think the point stands. Yachts are lovely things. I can't economically justify the Beethoven String Quartets or Steak au Poivre either, but I'd be very sad if they ceased to exist.
  5. miloman

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    I think it's just one of the many aesthetic elements that a designer can play with. Take a boat like John Alden's Pioneer, which is a miniature version of an ocean going tug. Everything is in perfect proportion to the 70-90 footers she's imitating, but she's only a bit over 50 ft (if I remember correctly). Once someone comes out of the sunken deck house and starts walking around on deck she shrinks, and captures some of the charm of a toy tug. Befitting of a yacht (all yachts are toys, right?) styled after a serious work boat, I think. (Few boats are as serious and purposeful looking as ocean going tugs.) In one of his books, Bill Garden jokes about how a lot of big powerboats look liked scaled up 30 footers, and consequently, when seen from afar, it looks like there's a crew of Tom Thumbs manning them. He has a point too, it can look ridiculous. In these cases, it's most likely due to trying to get as much volume as possible for a given length, not an aesthetic decision. I think that the play on proportionality works well with Francis Lee because she's already slightly paradoxical in terms of size. She's a 62 foot long 35 - 40 footer, and a spartan one at that. The occasional fleeting visual reminder that she's smaller than she seems works for me.
  6. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    I prefer Evinrude's 1957 Fishing Saucer Concept yacht.
  7. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    Curlew has that "miniature ship" quality. Reminds me of J. R. Purdon's Cockle.
  8. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    Bolger could certainly draw a pretty boat when he felt like it. Spartina is often mentioned as a particularly beautiful design. Personally, I'm very fond of Moccasin. She's unusual, but quite appealing. She's a bit down by the bow in this picture because she's resting on the mud.
  9. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    This photo raises a lot of questions. Is that the cabin sole? If not, what is it?
  10. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    Speaking of fast sleds, I've always thought that Rage was pretty cool. Long, narrow, light. Racing DLR ratio in the low 40s is impressive, particularly with her rather pleasant looking interior.
  11. miloman

    Perry Sliver Class Day Sailor

    Very exciting Kim! Congratulations. And this way, Bob won't have to bring his proverbial running shoes to the launch party. (Not that anyone was worried)
  12. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    All good points. From the most "high level" standpoint, political science has demonstrated a very strong correlation between industrial strength and military superiority. It's very rare for a country to win a war against an enemy with greater industrial strength. Superior military strategy and equipment tend to make for brief periods of military success, but not for eventual victory. The industrial power of the USSR and the USA dwarfed Germany's, even with the annexation or political control of most of Western Europe. Once the United States entered the war, victory for the allies was almost a foregone conclusion, it was more a matter of when and at what cost. It's interesting to note that Roosevelt set up a committee for planning a reconstruction of Europe after the war only days after Germany declared war on the US.
  13. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    Apparently, the forward placement of the engines coupled with the flat run aft was supposed to prevent squatting. Oheka II must have been a successful boat to be used as the basis for the S-Boats. But it's interesting to note that the engines in the S-Boats are further aft, near midships.
  14. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    Cool is in the eye of the beholder. PTs maxed out at approximately 35 kts. with 10,000 hp. S-boats were 10 knots faster on 3/4 the hp. The S-boats were based on the Lürssen built Oheka II. She was 74 ft LOA, 22.5 tonnes displacement. Her 3 Maybach VL2 V12s producing 500 hp each drove her to a top speed of 34 kts. To reduce weight she was built with wood planking over alloy frames.
  15. miloman

    Coolboats to admire

    The German S-boats seem like they were considerably better designs than the PT boats. The lines and arrangements were a development of some fast yachts from the prewar era. Most S-boats were around 115 ft. long, had a beam of 17 feet, (L/B of nearly 7:1) displaced 120 tons, and were fitted with triple super-charged 12 or 16 cylinder Daimler-Benz or M.A.N. diesels that could deliver a total of 7500 hp. Top speeds were over 45 knots. They were round bilged, comfortable in a seaway, and could maintain 25 knots even in really bad weather. There were quite a few plans published after the war for PT boat conversions. Can't imagine with those engines that they made for sensible family yachts.