Arced

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About Arced

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  1. A good main trimmer is the best way to deal with weather helm. The boats don't like being overpowered or heeled, especially with the stock rudder. You need to keep the bow down and the speed up whilst keeping the sails in balance. The rudder is little more than a trim tab.
  2. Is a bot shoe what I give my crew when they fuck up?
  3. Have done a few offshore races and a regatta against the one in Western Australia, rating 1.017 IRC. Nice boat, possibly under-powered in lighter stuff but sails to its rating in 15+, especially downwind. Finished third in IRC 2 at GBRW to a couple of First 34.7s. They are still getting it sorted - will become more competitive, I expect.
  4. One of the other 34.7s here installed the rescue rudder a couple of years back. It is definitely more "grippy" when pressed reaching - (34.7/10R owners will understand) - but not noticeably slower in the light stuff. IRC rating - no effect on measured draft, but maybe the carbon stock ups the ante? The fecker here rates 0.994 with pole vs our 0.999 with prod only. We carry a bit more sail area, however, and work really hard to keep the boat in balance. Glad you love your little caravan too, Jacques!
  5. Jobson? Pussy!
  6. Can the CG do that? Sounds somewhat coersive - not exactly standing by ready to render assistance.
  7. This threat is not confined to the Paralympics. Let's make the stand NOW!
  8. Naval officer in a Corby?
  9. Reaching - the little stock rudder certainly demands that the boat is kept balanced and on its feet, but that is not necessarily a bad thing. Weight back, hike hard, work the main, traveller and vang to keep the boat flat and the rudder in the water. And not too much rag. I expect that the bigger rudder pays its way on this the point of sail (but not if it is being dragged sideways through the water). Headsails - plenty of 34.7s have been optimised for IRC with non-overlappers, but personally, I would miss the boat's sub-10 sweet spot with the 140% genoas (which probably proves that we are optimised for light air!). Depends where you sail, of course. Off Fremantle, we tend to have either sub-10 or 20+. We do better in the former. In the bigger breezes, we carry our rating in the cabin, but it's a fun ride. It's great to see the Baltic 34.7s getting a class thing going. The non-overlapping, coach roof sheeted jibs are interesting, indeed. In 18+ on a J3, we in-haul to the V of the shrouds, but that is nowhere near the coach roof! Our upwind angles are 39-42 deg. I wonder what the Baltic guys get? Nice to have Kmag's input. Where do you tack the Code 0? On the prod? All the way out? Presumably not looking for a tight luff, upwind thing without a fixed prod & bob stay? We find that outboard sheeting positions (snatch block on a pad eye) are essential for reaching. A JT could be a weapon on a 34.7, but with limited funds, we always rate new jibs, kites & mains as a higher priority. Our kites are something like A1 (90 m2), A2 (100 m2), A3 (90 m2) & A5 (MH 78m2). Even the little one needs 120+ TWA at 10 TWS. I have found my UK Sails Tuning Guide from a few years ago. If you would like a copy, PM me your email address. Merry Christmas! (We are not PC in AUS!)
  10. Lee helm on a 34.7? Unusual! Moving the centre of effort forward would only make it worse, no? Agree with Terp & Joakim's comments re rig tune. We have always kept the butt in the middle position, so might be time to try the aft. Not sure how Paul will work around the lack of forestay adjustment. It's pretty important. The boat should be capable of low-mid 6s in 10 knots. Even with sub-optimal rig tune & sails, mid-high 5s should be easy enough. Maybe send a diver down to get the hull really clean (and check for buckets!) and see if that makes a difference?
  11. Agree that the Farr rough water VPPs are quite conservative. Our targets are a few percent higher and we sail a bit deeper downwind (with a fat A-sail). The pole boats go deeper still, of course. Upwind, the boat will happily sit in an under-speed groove all day if you don't build speed before going fully close hauled. Assuming you've got the basics covered (clean bottom, reasonable sails & rig tune, sufficient rail weight, calibrated instruments), try sheeting the sails to 90% and putting the nose down a few degrees to build speed until you hit target. Then smoothly squeeze the sails on to 100%. The boat is quite heavy, so it is a case of speed first, height second! In breezier conditions, the non-overlapping jibs need to be in-hauled to achieve a finer entry angle, or it all gets a bit over-powered (34.7s don't like over-powered - rudder's too small!) Congratulations on buying a good boat that will test and reward you.
  12. Sunfast 3600 "Kraken" (hull #2?) just completed the CYCA Newcastle Bass Is Race somewhere East of Kalgoorlie, and did OK on debut... http://www.cyca.com.au/sysfile/downloads/2015_summer/14_15_Summer/03RGrp3.htm
  13. The newer one I presume, do we know where it's off to ? Nup, Calm (the older one), http://sundancemarine.com.au/brokerage/50ft-yachts/modified-tp52-calm/ It's heading to WA A second TP52 for the WA dude!