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    • UnderDawg

      A Few Simple Rules   05/22/2017

      Sailing Anarchy is a very lightly moderated site. This is by design, to afford a more free atmosphere for discussion. There are plenty of sailing forums you can go to where swearing isn't allowed, confrontation is squelched and, and you can have a moderator finger-wag at you for your attitude. SA tries to avoid that and allow for more adult behavior without moderators editing your posts and whacking knuckles with rulers. We don't have a long list of published "thou shalt nots" either, and this is by design. Too many absolute rules paints us into too many corners. So check the Terms of Service - there IS language there about certain types of behavior that is not permitted. We interpret that lightly and permit a lot of latitude, but we DO reserve the right to take action when something is too extreme to tolerate (too racist, graphic, violent, misogynistic, etc.). Yes, that is subjective, but it allows us discretion. Avoiding a laundry list of rules allows for freedom; don't abuse it. However there ARE a few basic rules that will earn you a suspension, and apparently a brief refresher is in order. 1) Allegations of pedophilia - there is no tolerance for this. So if you make allegations, jokes, innuendo or suggestions about child molestation, child pornography, abuse or inappropriate behavior with minors etc. about someone on this board you will get a time out. This is pretty much automatic; this behavior can have real world effect and is not acceptable. Obviously the subject is not banned when discussion of it is apropos, e.g. talking about an item in the news for instance. But allegations or references directed at or about another poster is verboten. 2) Outing people - providing real world identifiable information about users on the forums who prefer to remain anonymous. Yes, some of us post with our real names - not a problem to use them. However many do NOT, and if you find out someone's name keep it to yourself, first or last. This also goes for other identifying information too - employer information etc. You don't need too many pieces of data to figure out who someone really is these days. Depending on severity you might get anything from a scolding to a suspension - so don't do it. I know it can be confusing sometimes for newcomers, as SA has been around almost twenty years and there are some people that throw their real names around and their current Display Name may not match the name they have out in the public. But if in doubt, you don't want to accidentally out some one so use caution, even if it's a personal friend of yours in real life. 3) Posting While Suspended - If you've earned a timeout (these are fairly rare and hard to get), please observe the suspension. If you create a new account (a "Sock Puppet") and return to the forums to post with it before your suspension is up you WILL get more time added to your original suspension and lose your Socks. This behavior may result a permanent ban, since it shows you have zero respect for the few rules we have and the moderating team that is tasked with supporting them. Check the Terms of Service you agreed to; they apply to the individual agreeing, not the account you created, so don't try to Sea Lawyer us if you get caught. Just don't do it. Those are the three that will almost certainly get you into some trouble. IF YOU SEE SOMEONE DO ONE OF THESE THINGS, please do the following: Refrain from quoting the offending text, it makes the thread cleanup a pain in the rear Press the Report button; it is by far the best way to notify Admins as we will get e-mails. Calling out for Admins in the middle of threads, sending us PM's, etc. - there is no guarantee we will get those in a timely fashion. There are multiple Moderators in multiple time zones around the world, and anyone one of us can handle the Report and all of us will be notified about it. But if you PM one Mod directly and he's off line, the problem will get dealt with much more slowly. Other behaviors that you might want to think twice before doing include: Intentionally disrupting threads and discussions repeatedly. Off topic/content free trolling in threads to disrupt dialog Stalking users around the forums with the intent to disrupt content and discussion Repeated posting of overly graphic or scatological porn content. There are plenty web sites for you to get your freak on, don't do it here. And a brief note to Newbies... No, we will not ban people or censor them for dropping F-bombs on you, using foul language, etc. so please don't report it when one of our members gives you a greeting you may find shocking. We do our best not to censor content here and playing swearword police is not in our job descriptions. Sailing Anarchy is more like a bar than a classroom, so handle it like you would meeting someone a little coarse - don't look for the teacher. Thanks.

SMBReno

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About SMBReno

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    Shorthanded sailing.
  1. An update for anyone interested in S. Honey's approach to setting up a LFP bank using the HousePower BMS. First, I adopted his his MOSFET-resistor circuit to replace the TYCO EV200 with a lower drain Blue Seas 7113 Battery Disconnect. Soldering this is a bit tricky, so pm me if you need details. This worked perfectly, disconnecting upon alarm and reconnecting upon BMS reset. Very low current drain c/w the Tyco. Second, Honey added thermal disconnect fuses on each battery cell in series with the alternator regulator power line, so the alternator is shut down in case of battery overheating. An alternative is to wire thermal fuses inline with the cell loop to the BMS, as interrupting this circuit also creates an alarm condition thus shutting down alternator via the HVC relay. Finally, you can test the various functions and relays by replacing the Battery +/- input with a dedicated 12V power supply, and recreating low and high voltage conditions. Leave the cell loop intact for these tests. I also use the Junsi Cell Log 8S's..(8S does data logging 8M does not) I even have one on my own bank. I use the Junsi for visual cell monitoring use & I have about 4 or 5 of them around the shop. For the money they are great little devices, and by little I mean little, as in you'll need glasses to read it. They are however tough to keep calibrated and they do tend to have some calibration drift over time. The log view software is also a real PITA but it does work.. I re-calibrate mine about 3-4 times a year and each time I do it I find it has again drifted away from calibration. I also invested in the JST terminals and molded plugs to make up my own harnesses, to avoid butt splicing the flimsy harness that comes with them. Great tool at a great price but I would personally not rely on one for my banks BMS. It is a great ad on to a BMS thought for visual or data logged cell voltage tracking. Do be sure to calibrate it though before use. Where do you obtain the JST Terminals and plugs, Main Sail?
  2. Look at Victron Energy MPPT controllers. Cheaper than Genasun (Victron Energy MPPT 75/10 Solar Charge Controller costs $85) and is programmable, while the Genasun is not. I've had both. Victron Energy tech support is excellent as is Genasun, although the Genasun has a lower VOC rating (34 vs 75 V) which some panels might surpass under really ideal conditions. PKYS sells Victron Energy. At $85 a piece, makes a lot of sense to just use one controller/panel.
  3. I'd ask the solar charge regulator manufacturer - they're the experts. Or we could just BS you....
  4. Singlehanding an Open 50. Big Balls in Cow Town!
  5. Here's a cheap battery monitor with a low voltage alarm I stumbled across: http://www.sailorssolutions.com/?page=ProductDetails&Item=VM01
  6. No problem. You won't be able to access individual cells in this sealed battery. The battery itself states it is LiFePO4 so that low voltage is a $300 potential problem. Most of the articles you read will deal with individual cells of 3.2VDC joined in series (4S= 12VDC, 8S=24VDC etc.) where the terminals are accessible. At best, you need a low voltage alarm and hope that the Genasun MPPT controller takes care of the upper voltages. A tiller pilot pulls a lot of current, so not surprising that you discharged to this level. The House Power BMS main board won't be of any use to you. You need a battery meter/alert system of some type (e.g., Victron https://www.victronenergy.com/battery-monitors/bmv-700) or LinkPro, or Blue Sea Systems to allow you to monitor your voltage and current use and alert you to low or high V states. I suppose the cheapest would be a simple digital voltmeter, but that won't warn you. No idea of your vessel, power, type of sailing, etc. so tough to suggest any solution. Start by calculating an Ahr budget by adding up all your energy requirements, and work from there. It doesn't sound like this battery is sized for your needs, and the solar you have doesn't charge rapidly enough to accommodate your ongoing energy use. Deep cycle or AGM may be a better choice, as you can just leave it charging on your solar controller when not sailing. Horses for courses, as they say.
  7. Too True! The Calb 180Ah 3.2 VDC bare cells are currently about $243 ea plus shipping, which will be expensive unless you pick them up locally in So Cal. Parts for the case ran me about $250 (aluminum plate and extrusions, G10 for bottom support, fasteners, 316SS fasteners and threaded rod, handles if you wish, acrylic sheet for cover), and then you need to build a BMS which includes at a minimum a box to house the bits, two or three high amp relays, lights, warning buzzer, reset switch, a high amp disconnect, cell monitors, wiring etc. and the BMS circuit board. Figure a minimum of $250 probably more like $350. Then as Main Sail has so appropriately stated, spend about 6 months reading and drawing schematics until you understand how to fit it all together. He judges this project as an 11 out of 1-10 for diy skill. I would agree. Then, unless you have a programmable alternator regulator you also have to add a new one, and if you use them, new shore power charger, and new solar regulator for Li. So I'm going to say I have a minimum of $2,000 in costs at this point not counting the dedicated 12V power supply I purchased to top balance. As have others, I can't emphasize enough that LiFePO4 is a system not a battery. You just can't spend hours balancing the cells and assembling the pack and expect to just replace your vessel's existing wet cell battery. It would be foolish if not dangerous. Unless you are like me and have to really understand how the system works in order to use it or service it, I'd use one of the plug and play systems. Can't recommend Maine Sail's three part series enough as a starting point. Where do I find info on this? http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/lifepo4_on_boats
  8. Sorry, can't edit my response above for some reason. Mean partial State of Charge (SOC) NOT partial social like a surly singlehander. Bottom line-put in a BMS.
  9. My approach would depend upon the use. If day sailing only and not charging when away from boat (LFP lasts longer if you keep at partial social) you might get away with it but too deep a discharge could destroy your battery. If offshore and busy Definitely need one for safety. Most marine users use the House Power bms and cell sensors. See Maine Sails series or some of the other posts mentioned in this thread.
  10. Another useful link, this time from a German electrical engineer/cruiser who discusses in great detail his needs and designs of a LiFePO4 system. Lots of useful info here for the non-EE! http://www.entropypool.de/engineering/
  11. Also, if you read Stan Honey's article referenced above, and decide to go with a 4S cell for a battery monitor, be aware that Clean Power no longer offers them. Too bad, because it would reduce the sensitive electronic bits on top of an otherwise conventional battery.
  12. Here's another good resource from Stan Honey: https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://honeynav.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/LFP-battery-Stan-Honey-notes.pdf&ved=0ahUKEwia_8vPpL_OAhVNySYKHRtTCjwQFggkMAM&usg=AFQjCNFt6LpuoSrTas2TAiUrFCmYicU0GA&sig2=3mhyE-kxTQ2kAR8KHs3pqg
  13. I reviewed the Calb manual. They don't explicitly address the end plate issue. Perhaps including end (and side) plates of AL or G10 inside the ss straps would be a simple solution. I wanted the flexibility of isolating individual cells on shore for testing and replacement if necessary. Plus if honest, I enjoy fabrication.
  14. Too True! The Calb 180Ah 3.2 VDC bare cells are currently about $243 ea plus shipping, which will be expensive unless you pick them up locally in So Cal. Parts for the case ran me about $250 (aluminum plate and extrusions, G10 for bottom support, fasteners, 316SS fasteners and threaded rod, handles if you wish, acrylic sheet for cover), and then you need to build a BMS which includes at a minimum a box to house the bits, two or three high amp relays, lights, warning buzzer, reset switch, a high amp disconnect, cell monitors, wiring etc. and the BMS circuit board. Figure a minimum of $250 probably more like $350. Then as Main Sail has so appropriately stated, spend about 6 months reading and drawing schematics until you understand how to fit it all together. He judges this project as an 11 out of 1-10 for diy skill. I would agree. Then, unless you have a programmable alternator regulator you also have to add a new one, and if you use them, new shore power charger, and new solar regulator for Li. So I'm going to say I have a minimum of $2,000 in costs at this point not counting the dedicated 12V power supply I purchased to top balance. As have others, I can't emphasize enough that LiFePO4 is a system not a battery. You just can't spend hours balancing the cells and assembling the pack and expect to just replace your vessel's existing wet cell battery. It would be foolish if not dangerous. Unless you are like me and have to really understand how the system works in order to use it or service it, I'd use one of the plug and play systems. Can't recommend Maine Sail's three part series enough as a starting point.
  15. Hi Greg. Probably more helpful if I give you dimensions, as although our boats are "I-dentical" as the prosecutor in My Cousin Vinny stated, my electrical system has been modified significantly at Betts. Assuming you built an enclosure similar to mine, you would need to house a battery pack of about 13" L x 13" H x 9 1/2" W. This includes about 1" clearance to lift or slide battery out. I haven't picked a final location, but thinking about several that can be made secure and allow short wire runs.