P Flados

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About P Flados

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    North Carolina

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  1. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    The rear foil has the rubber thing molded in up at the top. This seals it up pretty good.
  2. P Flados

    Corona Virus

    The Florida / Texas / California new cases are a real concern. It will be a while before we understand what percentage of these new cases have severe or terminal impact. However, I will point out that in terms of ultimate impact, the US would not look bad at this point compared to Europe without the very sad situation from a handful of very Blue states. Although some of the states that were hit hard early on have drastically reduced their death rates, others have not. The continuing problems in New Jersey and Massachusetts are most notable.
  3. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Sealing the strut is the next to last item in UFO Upgrades for Reliability and Ease of Use. I recommend re-reading the entire list for most owners.
  4. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Well I had a great outing yesterday and finally got several minutes of worth viewing video extracted from 2 hours of raw footage. Newbie out in the ocean All of the footage was me giving the ocean a try. Wind was forecast to build as the day went on and stronger offshore than inshore. When I got to my selected sailing spot, the wind was lacking. So I gave offshore a try. Most of the "fun sailing" was more skimming than foiling. Anything higher than a beam reach was pretty slow as the period was just wrong for getting any speed. After coming back inshore I got in a few runs with some of my "best yet" foiling stretches. Of course the camera battery was dead by then. Other good points for the day included: No injuries, scrapes or dings I did not break anything I "recovered acceptably" at the end of every brief foiling stretch and as such had a zero capsize day My re-paint job on the edge of the boat join seem to work and both hulls were dry after the outing PF rudder rake modification version 4.3 worked great for the second straight outing. I found that my boat seemed to like more rudder rake than I had previously tried. I adjusted more and more rake as the day went on and ended up at 0.55" back from full forward without noticing any problem. I was also happy with my "rake setting scale" mod that has a scribe mark on the rod and 0.1" marks going backward from full forward.
  5. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Now that you got some movement, you are heading in the right direction. A build up of aluminum oxide is the problem. The build up can be pretty tough. Movement and the right chemicals can eventually break down this build up. You choice of lubricant can make a difference. For getting corroded bimetallic joints loose, Kroil usually comes to the top of the list if you ask around. Keep it soaking in a penetrating lubricant and do not get in a hurry. I would worry about heating. Any heating greater than say 150°F could be transmitted from the strut to the SS tab and then to the foil materials. Any time I successfully used heat to free a metallic joint, it took an awful lot more than 150 °F.
  6. P Flados

    Team NYYC

    I will admit that having a team leader grinding away may be a not so good idea. Hum, was that the problem with the 72' cat.
  7. P Flados

    Team NYYC

    And just what is your basis for implying that the US B1 (or any of the B1s for that matter) was "off the mark". Foils, foil controls and sails are much bigger factors than hulls. Working out how to best execute tacks and jibes (this includes foils, foil controls and crew work) is of huge importance. All of the B1 allowed adequate testing of foils, foil controls and sails. All B1s produced plenty of data to be fed back into the simulators so as to optimize the B2s. All B1s allowed for crew training and working out logistical issues sailing this platform. B1s were not built for competition. Any competing they do will be pointless (not mattering to the AS outcome) and will not even be a good comparison of performance (since the racing will be pointless). Foil design choices for marginal wind performance vs. high speed optimization were probably more important choices for the B1s than hull shape. Bulb vs. no bulb may turn into a big deal. They each made their choices and I expect most will "move toward the middle" with their B2s. So again, do you have any basis for your post other than meaningless trash talk. If you want trash talk, all of the splashing around by the defender has been highlighted at least once or twice.
  8. P Flados

    Corona Virus

    I agree that using the ER as the primary care system for the un-insured is a lousy situation. My oldest son works in the ER and I get to hear him gripe about what it has evolved into. With Obama care rules, the number of un-insured working people is less than it used to be. Around here I think a big fraction of the un-insured can claim to be incapable of paying and end up getting care for no cost. Deductibles and co-pays can be painful, but at least the government stepped in and tried to reduce some of the co-pay cost for Covid care. Of course it is a big mess many many will get billed and end up paying more than they should. However, my point was more to the fact that our screwed up system is probably not preventing large numbers of people from getting needed medical care.
  9. P Flados

    Corona Virus

    I agree with much of what you have been saying. However, I have a different opinion on the US situation. Yes, the US has handled things very badly, but I am not sure that the majority of the problem is the health care system. Anyone with no insurance can walk into any Hospital Emergency Room and receive care. If needed, they are typically admitted and treated for free. The care for these folk may not be as good as for those with insurance and resources, but I have not heard of a lot of deaths attributed to lack of reasonable care by hospitals. The bad outcomes of the poor / homeless segment is probably more related to their overall health issues outside of Covid. The segment that has probably deserves the most blame for bad / inadequate care is the nursing home segment. The sad situation at these facilities is nothing new and Covid is only making the negligence more visible than ever. The bigger screw up for the US relates to the lack of a good consistent message from State and Federal leadership on the need for all individuals to "do what it takes" to reduce the spread rate and protect the vulnerable. Right now we have way too many that are convinced that they can get away with taking their chances. The careless actions by this segment is needlessly fueling the growth in new cases by increasing the average number of people that they spread it to before an infected individual figures out that they have the virus. We all want life to get back "more normal" but leadership should be making the case that the only way we will be allowed to get "more normal" is if everyone does their part. In many locations, good compliance with social distancing, hand washing, mask wearing, etc. has worked to get the spread rates down and keep them down.
  10. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Between the Covid stay at home mess (things seem to be getting worse here and we have health issues at my house that make me not want to take chances) and the lack of wind, I got bored. I decided to document my UFO mods and repairs. And since Martin is sharing his efforts, I though what the heck: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1LcToxGGarAwXOiiUnwgSgDZmyr8cHqfV/view?usp=sharing And since I am probably not the only one bored, how about some help. Surely someone is getting their UFO wet. Where are the rest of the vids and stories.
  11. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Thanks for the fedback. The first couple of take offs were with too much main foil rake. I adjusted it and things improved. I will probably dial in a little more rudder rake next outing. My headings were mostly a function of staying on a path that gave me decent length runs without running aground in some shallow areas I was avoiding. Fortunately the shallows were gradual and super soft mud and not the usual abrupt sand bars that have caused me so much grief. I was trying to zig - zag a little to get speed then lift off, but my timing just did not seem to do a lot of good. It seemed it was just more about hooking up to a puff that would get me to foiling speed. My overhand sheeting is getting better, but I still fumble. Fumbling will probably continue as I work on trading bad old habits for good new ones. Also, I am also having hand / finger / grip issues that are very frustrating (probably just a getting old thing). My steering / sheeting "instincts" are actually terrible. I am having to really focus on minimal steering and trying to control roll with sheeting. More than half of my crashes from foiling were either sheeting out at the wrong time, or not sheeting in early enough. Again, bad old habits and/or big need for good new habits. And back to the mast rotation thing, I am aware that the big risk of a longer mainsheet comes when sailing with the main foil up. At normal max rotation, one of the shrouds is tight up against the back of the gantry. Any more rotation and loads will increase a lot. I need to remember to add a second stopper knot to limit mast rotation to the normal range if I am going to be sailing any distance with the main foil up (especially in more than light winds).
  12. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    I do not see a problem with the sail track. The mast rotates with the sail. With the cunningham connected at the bottom of the mast (not the boat) and with the main foil down, I can disconnect my mast hold down line and spin the mast / sail 360° without any binding. Because the booms are connected to the spreaders, they rotate the mast and the sail track is continuously held in alignment with the boom.
  13. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Went out again yesterday. I spent 4 hours on the water to get 20 minutes of decent wind. I estimate 1.5 hours tacking 3 miles down the channel, 20 minutes good wind at my chosen sailing location, 15 minutes too little wind, 20 minutes trying to foil with too much wind (and spending as much time in the water as sailing), the rest getting back to the ramp. However, I did manage to get my new action camera to catch my lousy attempts at foiling. https://youtu.be/4RPeS22fW8o After the wind got too strong and the waves too big for me to foil, I started my 3 mile journey back to the ramp with the wind about 10° off of straight down the 200 yard wide channel. I was running with the main sheet full out to the stopper knot (boom not quite 90° to boat centerline), but was still having a hard time controlling the boat when a gust would hit. My first 3 runs ended in a swim. Getting the boat back upright in strong winds and nasty chop was no fun. My first crash was from unintended foiling. I adjusted the wand down to where it would just be active. The next run I got going too fast again and crashed with the boat rolling over on top of me. My next crash was a pitchpole. The next run, I stayed slow and made it across the channel without a crash. However, I realized that if I was going to sail slow enough to stay in control, it was going to be a pain to get back (I was not sailing nearly as deep as desired). Then I put the boat in park mode, went to the back, un-tied the mainsheet from the boom (hard to do in a strong & gusty wind without have the boat blow nose over stern), and then tied a quick figure eight in the end of the line to give me a longer effective mainsheet. This time out I was testing having the cuningham going down to the mast collar for easier mast rotation, so my mast was now free to rotate all I wanted. Also, the main foil was full down so it did not get in the way. I eased the sail out with the end of the boom about 3' forward of the mast, pointed the boat down the channel and took off nice and easy. I played the mainsheet for a nice stable controlled ride the rest of the way back in. Today I went through my stash of old boating stuff. I found a longer mainsheet that I am going to start using to make these kind of return trips a little easier. I also installed the improved Righting Line Kit that Fulcrum sent mt a while back but I had never installed.
  14. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    I had a nice outing today. I still suck at getting / keeping the boat foiling, but I am getting a little air time and only splashed once. I was using version 4.1 of my modified rudder. I upgraded the strongback that pulls back on the pintle (it is now 3/8" SS tube inside 1/2" SS tube). I fabbed a small bracket that secures it at the bottom. I got rid of the 3/16" low stretch line and went with 8 wraps around the pintle using braided nylon string. On one run today, I strayed 20' too far to the southeast side of the channel and hit a sandbar hard at 6.8 knots. It snapped the string and brought the boat to an abrupt stop. I made my way over to the shore, tide a knot at the break, did 7 wraps, applied tension and continued sailing. I am mulling over needed changes to avoid sting breakage. The first photo show the wraps spead out, the second shows the bracket at the bottom, the third shows it ready to use. After posting these photos, I noted that you can see the somewhat sloppy application of carbon fiber tow that I wrapped around the rudderhead plates. I put a couple of wraps around the upper plate and a bunch around the lower. For me this was a quick and easy alternative to the upgrade recommendation at UFO Upgrades For Reliability and Ease of Use.
  15. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Randy, I also recommend that you give it a few more tries before giving up. I am "only" 63, but I am getting much less nimble and mobile than I used to be and I am starting to have trouble with my hands/fingers and joints in general. Several times I got all worn out and really struggled getting back into shore in good order. Much of my struggles I attribute to not slowing down, catching my breath, thinking things through and doing each task correctly. If you are still using the pin block (I do), it can have alignment issues that makes it hard to insert or remove the pin. The quick fix it to put the boat on its side at the house, insert the strut, and then install the foil, gantry & tie rod. Line up the hole at the top of the strut with a desired hole in the pin block. Run a 1/4" drill through it. Confirm that the pin goes in and out ok. Move to the next desired hole in the pin block and repeat. Fulcrum will send you and upgraded block (and other upgrade supplies) as needed. Note that some of the upgrades (spreader bracket and mast upgrades) really are important to avoid bad breakage issues (I speak from experience). To facilitate coming in to an easy working depth (say 3'), you really need to be able to get the main foil up and secured and the rudder set for a depth of 2' or so. First step is put the boat where it needs to be and put it in parking mode. Note that it will drift slowly downwind. Again, take a minute and rest if needed. I have never had the main foil "unlatch" by itself. I have been challenged to get it latched / unlatched when I wanted (did I say my hands/fingers have issues). There is an alternate to the latch. Tie a small line (1/8" to 1/4" and ~4' long) to the spreader bracket on the mast when you are setting up the boat. Just let it dangle when you are not using it. To secure the main foil up, just stand up next to the mast, reach down and grab the gantry and pull the main foil/strut assembly up. When you get the assembly all of the way up, loop the line from the spreader bracket under the gantry and tie it off. I am thinking I am going to start using this method on a regular basis myself. Let them younger guys fight that latch and us older (wiser?) guys can plan ahead for making this task easy. Using this method to hold the main foil up at launch may also make it easier to drop the foil at the start of your outing. I added the friction thumbscrew to my rudder foil, but the rudder is still a pain to deal with most of the time as I get ready to beach the boat. My rudder is a pretty tight fit in the bracket and I have had very little luck getting it to come up when I want it to while sailing. After getting the main foil secured, try laying down on the boat and reaching out to the rudder. Make sure the friction screw is backed off and the rudder downhaul is pulled loose through the clamcleat. Try to wiggle the rudder while pulling up on it. Once I get it up at least 4", I can grab the rudder just above the rudder bracket, I push down on the bracket with the heel of my hand and use a prying action to work the rudder up an inch or so at a time. Once it is about half way up, use both the friction screw and the downhaul line to secure it. Too many times I have used just the friction screw and then the rudder went all of the way up at a really bad time on the way in. .