P Flados

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About P Flados

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    North Carolina

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  1. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Heating a steel rod can make it a lot softer. It depends on existing cold work or and/or heat treat.
  2. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    For the outhaul, my original soft shackle loop was just too tight. I retied it and it is better now, but it is still a pain. I think that a 2-3" tail on the part with the fig 8 knot would make it much easier.
  3. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    I have tried the main block both ways and am leaning toward off, but not sure yet. Of course the above really means nothing at this point. Ask me again If/when I get to regular controlled foiling,
  4. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    For anyone getting water in the hulls, I used my shop vac in blow mode held up to a drain plug hole. You do not need a seal at the connection, just an air supply that can provide plenty of volume. With just a little pressure in the hulls it was easy to find my big leak (one of the holes on the back top/bottom join). I could feel the air whistling out. I sprayed soapy water on other places I was worried about, but did not find anything else worth worrying about. An air mattress inflater would also work pretty good.
  5. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    For those of you interested in my previous post, I found that the "windsurfing a cat" tacking thing can be executed pretty quick with a little practice. Unlike the traditional method for recovery from being in irons, the only losses in "position over the water" are from the wind pushing the boat backwards before you are moving forward on your new tack. For me, I am not quick to change sides on the boat. I tend to snag on the sail or otherwise do something that gets me to zero headway as soon as I am on the new side. If you are making no headway, you really need to push out the sail to get the boat pointed off of the wind anyway. Getting to a standing position and pushing out the sail takes but a moment if you are mentally geared to do this "as needed". As the sail is pushed out, the boat gets oriented 90° to the wind pretty much in sync with sail position. Then you can do the sweeping pull on the boom and take off is quick. Again, once you get to zero headway you do not want any delay in getting the rig pushed out. This is true for any UFO recovery from irons. Before the rig is pushed out, the wind has an easy time pushing the boat backwards more than is desirable. Once the rig is pushed out and the boat is at close to 90° to the wind, the boat will not be pushed downwind nearly as fast. Unless you are fighting both wind and tidal currents (an all too regular thing for me), the "need for speed" on the part of the sailor is mostly over with the rig pushed out.
  6. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    FYI, Last time out, I tried something different for a "get out of irons quick" method. Think of it as windsurfing a cat with a rudder. I think I did this trick with main foil down, main foil up and various rudder depths. It worked every time and it got the boat moving quick. This can be real helpful if you are in irons and a tide is dragging you towards somewhere you really do not want to go (such as a dock) Let the main sheet full out with stopper knot up against the block. Stand up and position yourself about an arms length behind the mast. Push the boom full out (Heisman style). This gets the boat stationary in the water pointing close to 90° to the wind. Instead of dropping down and working the main sheet, stay standing, pull the boom in with a firm sweeping motion using your front hand while keeping the tiller in your rear hand and rudder centered. The big sweeping motion on the rig will get the boat moving fast enough for the rudder to start working while rounding up the boat for a nice upwind heading. You can sail the boat upwind for short upwind tacks like this without ever using the main sheet. Real handy for short zig zags in close quarters. If you are trying to make headway downwind, do the same initial stuff to get the boat moving and then steer downwind and let the rig out as soon as the rudder gives you control. As soon as you get past 90° to the wind you can easily drop down and start working the main sheet if you want. If you are holding the boom and heading upwind, you can drop down and start pulling in the mainsheet, but you may need to be turning the boat downwind as you do this to keep up enough speed to not stall out the rudder.
  7. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    FYI, when I repaired my main foil flap dent with epoxy / chopped fiberglass, I did nothing after fairing the surface. After one outing, a nice shallow dent was back in place.
  8. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    After about 6 hours on the water today, the wind dropped off to ~ 8 knots of wind and I decided to call it quits. I was working my way upwind back to the ramp with main foil up and rudder foil half up. About 300 yards from the ramp my mast broke at the deck and fell down. Really confused me as I had been pushing the boat for hours, never put the mast under any unusual stress and then it just fell over as I was taking it easy. When I got home, I noticed the plastic collar under the carbon rings had worked its way down the mast around 1" where it should have been. I had noticed this at least once before and had just slid it back up when I saw it. I am pretty sure it started out the day full up. My current theory is that when the collar slid down to below the hole in the deck, this allowed the mast to bang back and forth in an oversize hole with the actual carbon tube getting direct impact loads. Once a carbon tube starts getting some damage it can pop a few more fibers with each load cycle. This continues until gross failure. Next question is repair or replacement.
  9. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Whatever I hit must have been a sloping surface. The impact was not head on of the kind that wants to stop the boat. It was off to one side on the foil and it lifted the rear of the boat up. That is what caused the tensile failure of the structural fabric on the bottom surface. And I using a prototype AoA adjuster that protects the rod. It uses bungee cords to pull the pintle to the rear. When I hit something that generates more force than the bungee cords, the pintle moves forward until it reaches the end of the slot.
  10. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Martin, You seem to be rough on your boat. If it is any consolation, you are not alone. I went out on Monday. I worked my way from the ramp down the intercoastal water way 1.5 miles with the wind some 20° off from being a dead headwind. Then I got to a wide spot where I could reach back and forth across with runs about 800 ft. I got in a few runs with short stable foiling. I also crashed a few times. I had one hard nose dive & capsize from a ventilated main foil while foiling. While trying to get the boat upright, my bare feet slipped on the hull resulting in a 1" long gash in my shin. After a couple of more runs, I decided to call it a day and headed back On the way back to the ramp, I had an ~10 knot wind to my back and a ~ 3 knot tide current helping me. I thought running downwind with he foils down would be Ok as long I stayed mid channel. However, I got off to one side a little too much and my rudder foil did hit something solid pretty hard. Probably a log. Back at the ramp, I noticed what first looked like a gouge all the way through the gel coat on the bottom of the rudder foil. When I got home I looked at it better & found that the bottom layers of fiberglass and carbon fiber cloth had failed in tension right at the end of the metal "T" tab. In addition to making repairs, I decided that I wanted something stronger than the original construction. I ground out all of the gel coat in a 4" x 8" rectangle and ground out even deeper near the failure (see attached photo). I did a build up using carbon fiber with just a little fiberglass on top. I think I have built up enough material such that after one more sanding I will be done with the bottom. There was also a crack in the gelcoat on the top surface. I ground though the gelcoat and found no damage to the fiberglass on the top side. That area has also been built up and is in need of sanding tomorrow.
  11. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    I fully appreciate the "fuse" concept in the AOA rod and I understand the expected progression of damage the harder the grounding or object impact. Most of my expected groundings will be where I am not trying to go fast. Think launch site more than a mile from decent water with travel via intracoastal waterway. For these groundings I expect to have rod buckle only impact levels and hate the thought of ruining an entire sailing day after launching by buckling a rod on my way to deeper water. For getting the sail out more, I was just talking a little more rotation so I could sail deeper as I was tacking down. I had a stopper knot in the main sheet, and it was hard up against the block. I will have to see how far I was from having the shrouds against the main foil strut. Good general advice for resting. I had previously picked up on the "park mode" and I use it a lot to catch my breath. I figured out that I needed "not pretty" real fast and I did walk the boat quite a bit. I did it more for launching than for coming in. This location was not bad for walking most of the time with a sand bottom. At launch, I did have to trudge through a stretch of soft sticky mud. Other places have been worse with mostly mud and/or the additional threat provided by oysters. Backing down with 1' of rudder in the water and me way forward worked pretty good. I was lucky that this location did not have any real waves, just small chop. The "swim sail" sounds interesting.
  12. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    I do not sweat the rudder drag at slow speeds when I am expecting it (close to shore). My problems have been either when I was running main foil up and rudder down 18" while I do tricky sailing to get from launch point to the better sailing areas or it was where I was trying to foil and one or more sides of a "good area" had shallows a good distance from shore at near low tide. On a different note, my last outing also showed me the perils of trying to sail a UFO like a normal boat while needing to travel a good way down wind in 15+ knots of wind and with unidentified areas likely to be less than 3' of water. I had the main foil up, but I still had to have around 2' of rudder down to even have a chance to control the boat. Then with the main sheet full out, I was tacking downwind but had to sit almost hanging off the stern, and zig upwind as needed with every puff to keep the bows "no more than a little bit" below the surface. Eventually I gave up tacking, got directly upwind of the ramp, turned the nose to the wind, stood right next to the mast and backed my way in until I was within 30' of shore. Now that I have had time to think it though, I think there was a better way. If I had loosened the cunningham to minimum (but still fully routed to secure the mast in the boat in the case of a capsize) and re-routed the mainsheet so I could let it run (single strand ) from my hand to the clew, then I could let the sail rotate way more around to the front of the boat to control power.
  13. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    Well my third trip out today gave me my first taste of both hulls out, stable boat height and not rolling in either direction. Sad to say this was only on a couple of runs and individual flight duration was less than 15 seconds. This was with a very down powered rig given the 15 knots gusting to 20 knots conditions (not really a good thing for a rank beginner). All sailing was in "training mode" or a more mid height setting. Lots of fast foil assist stuff, but boy do I have a lot to learn (and UFO unfriendly old habits to un-learn). This was also my third location to sail in. It was a better than the other two, but it still had issues. I have run the rear foil into sand or mud on every trip out. I still have a couple of other places I need to try. I am also working on making the boat more tolerant of rear foil grounding. There is just no way the adjusting/connecting rod of the original setup can handle the loads of a hard grounding, it just buckles and make a mess of rake angle and rake adjustability. I found this out on trip #2. Today, my "improved setup" kind of worked, but it is still not right.
  14. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    See page 17, Post 1654, for Dave's hound/sailtrack repair guidance on a similar problem.
  15. P Flados

    Steve and Dave Clarks Unidentified Foiling Object

    A UFO has landed in Southeastern North Carolina. After UFO 0017 was used for an early demo, it sat around not being used (but it was stored inside). I got lucky and stumbled across an add for it at a good price and location. Turned out the owner was headed my way and volunteered to deliver the boat from Cape Hatteras to its new home in Wilmington NC . It was in pretty good shape. I did some minor fixes: The adjuster wheel for the rudder rake had too much slop. I made some shim washers from a milk jug. The surface in front of the adjuster wheel is not square to the adjuster rod. I have a plan for making it more true at a later date. The the lower gudgeon hole was way oversized and the rudder tolerances did not allow the normal bushing installation. The rudder opening is just big enough to slip over the gudgeons with zero room for the flange on a bushing between the gudgeon and the rudder bracket (the part that looks like a washer in the photo in the Owner's guide. It came with one bushing in the lower rudder bracket (inserted from below) and a bushing with the flange cut off for the lower gudgeon hole). I did a re-work that looks good and seems to work like it should (negligible slop in any direction). If It works out OK, I will provide more details. I also noted a ~1/16" deep dent in the main foil flap caused by the end of the pushrod (boy the diameter of that rod is smaller than I expected) I ground out the material around the dent to make a depression the diameter of a dime to be filled back in with epoxy / chopped fiberglass. I found that the dent was pretty much just damage to a thick layer of gel coat. For now, I took and old beater 4' x 6' utility trailer and set it up as a UFO trailer. Conditions look good for a first sail tomorrow.