boomer

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About boomer

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  1. boomer

    A Form of Cruising...

    We did too, everyone liked getting off the boat and spending time hiking about, seeing the sights and occasionally a sit down meal at a decent restaurant if available, but mostly cooked three meals aboard. The Sportsman Steak House in Port McNeil, just off the dock, conveniently had a prime rib special the Friday night we arrived for $20, with the prime rib so tender it could be cut with a fork - that's a hell good deal in the boondocks, let alone any city. We did sail day and night going up the Strait of Georgia for two and half days, to take advantage of making good time over that stretch of water, but mostly anchored at night going up the inside passage, other then using the free government docks one evening in Rock Bay and another evening in Port Neville.
  2. boomer

    A Form of Cruising...

    With flying colors and much thanks to Kenmore Air for opening and checking the package to make sure all the parts were in one order and calling us to confirm. Still have to make a video of our return trip, but have quite a bit of footage to still sort through. Once back down the inside, went over to Desolation Sound, then down to Powell River, then on to Bedwell Harbor. Considered going up Jarvis Inlet and up the Reaches to Princess Louisa Inlet, but we were getting short on time time for one of the crew catching his flight home. So did one long full dayer to Porlier Pass and into the Gulf Islands and Ganges Harbor again. Then on to the San Juans and Friday Harbor to check into customs, and then catch the last of the ebb tide to squirt us into the Strait of Juan de Fuce and the flood tide to carry us into and on up Admiralty Inlet, making it to the barn by 2200 hrs that evening. Total distance for the trip, sailed and motored, according to the GPS was 862 nautical miles.
  3. boomer

    A Form of Cruising...

    BTW Ajax sounds like you all had a pleasant cruise, we just returned from a month long cruise up the inside passage. Sheared a tail shaft about 14 miles north of Nanaimo, on the Atomic 4 tranny. Turned around to sail home to install an old tail shaft from another Atomic 4 we have at home. But stopped in Nanaimo, just in case there was a tailshaft available locally, which their wasn't. So sailed south through Dodd Narrows on a flood tide and into the Gulf Islands down to Ganges Harbor. Woke up Sunday in Ganges Harbor and said, screw it - we'll just keep sailing north up the Strait of Georgia to Discovery Passage, on through Seymour Narrows, then on up the rest of Discovery Passage to Johnstone Strait to Port McNeil, a distance of only 301 nautical miles when one skirts the exclusion zone north of Nanaimo, which should take about five days at a casual pace - which is enough time for Moyer Marine to overnight the parts to Kenmore Air, and have Kenmore Air send the package on their regularly scheduled Saturday flight to Port McNeil, which saved a bundle shipping, only costing $25 for the 20lb package. Had Moyer send a new reversing gear, with the tail shaft pressed in from Moyer, plus all the gaskets, and the Moyer Service and Overhaul Manual. Installed the new parts, and then realigned the engine/transmission to propeller to the required .006 tolerance on all four quadrants of the flanges. Don't think the engine had been aligned to those required tolerances, because after we finished the alignment and give her a test run, found the engine transmission was quite a bit smoother and vibration free. Crossing the Straits of Juan de Fuca on the approach to Admiralty Inlet and on home to the North Puget Sound.
  4. boomer

    A Form of Cruising...

    Osprey are always interesting to watch when they fish, especially when they catch a big one.
  5. boomer

    1st post, need help understanding Westsail 32

    Yes he did sailing the Olson 30 Intense in '88 in 11 days and 15 hours (9:06:49 corrected)to break the old Singlehanded Transpac record at the time. History of the Singlehanded Transpac However I'm talking about him taking a Wetsnail 32 and beating most the faster boats on the sound in a well attended race on corrected time. In this race the slower boats start first. The first two slower rating classes only race to Pilot Point, while the faster rating classes race the much longer distance to Foulweather Bluff. If light winds are expected the day of the race, then all classes race to a buoy set off of Pilot Point, then to Scatchet Head Bell buoy and return to the start/finish, or to Scatchet Head bell buoy then to Pilot Point and return to the start/finish, as in the '17 Foulweather Bluff Race. With Class 2 starting 30 minutes ahead of our Class 7, two in our class finally caught and passed him just before the finish as seen at the end of this video. Class 2 start at 00:36.
  6. boomer

    1st post, need help understanding Westsail 32

    Tuesday is being a wee bit modest. With his Westsail 32 and crew he won his class and first place overall in the Foulweather Bluff Race last fall. However, he's a very good sailor. Just about every boat he's ever raced, he made a habit of sailing the boat to it's full potential, while using good sound course management. Foulweather Bluff Race Big Little Duel in Foulweather Bluff Race Foulweather Blauff Race results
  7. boomer

    VOR Leg 10 Cardiff to Gothenburg

    Thanks Despacio - Yes both cruised and done deliveries. Many of the fisherman use Sat phones, but only use them if they really need to or to let a crewman call home. We usually have enough to stay busy, without having to rely getting on the net - when near a town, do get on the net, it's just to check the weather or download videos.
  8. boomer

    VOR Leg 10 Cardiff to Gothenburg

    Have a enjoyable cruise. We - My son, an old service bud and another old friend are heading out on the early AM tide on Tuesday as well, for mosey up the inside passage to Alaska, be back sometime near the end of July. Will have to follow the race sporadically when we get a cell signal.
  9. boomer

    VOR Leg 10 Cardiff to Gothenburg

    Yes SC - they used good course management for a commanding performance while extending. Mapfre didn't to shabby either.
  10. boomer

    VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

    Well said Paps. Congrats to Brunel & crew, Akzo and crew and to Dongfeng and crew. Dongfeng did what they had to do, to place themselves for third place finish, passing Vestas a few days ago and holding them off to the finish, to garner the points to place Dongfeng on top of the leader board. They displayed the importance of consistency throughout the races legs. A job well done! As for the tides and light winds at the finish of the last two legs - it's port to port for a reason - fortunately they have a finish line at the port - back in the clipper days, the winner was determined by the first ship to dock - those of us who have to deal with tidal currents and winds, from gale to zephyrs: this is old hat - as Conrad said, "Those grousing about tidal currents and light air, this goes back to the clipper days, when the first first clipper into London was paid a premium per ton - no matter the tide and wind. A full account of the Great Tea Race including the race to load ballast and tea - Great Tea Race of 1866
  11. boomer

    VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

    Overlaid with the pressure so one can calculate the correction related to pressure. Pressure Height Adjustment 963 mb +0.5 meters 973 mb +0.4 meters 983 mb +0.3 meters 993 mb +0.2 meters 1003 mb +0.1 meters 1013 mb 0 meters 1023 mb -0.1 meters 1033 mb -0.2 meters 1043 mb -0.3 meters
  12. boomer

    VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

    Posted it above your posts, however I couldn't find the multiple for the correction factor though I'd expect it to be close to .8 to .9
  13. boomer

    VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

    Tide Stream - Western Approach Tide Stream - English and British Channels
  14. boomer

    VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

    To clarify about the best modern autopilots - These days, the most sophisticated autopilots have “fuzzy logic” software and three-dimensional motion sensors and can steer in strong conditions just as well as, if not better than, most humans. Modern autopilots can learn a boat’s handling characteristics and can sense a boat’s bow or stern rising to a wave, but they can’t perceive what’s going on around a boat. Once you’re in a big seaway where waves are routinely breaking, it’s best to have a driver who can see, feel and hear (daytime) and feel and hear (at night) the rough stuff and steer around it.
  15. boomer

    VOR Leg 9 Newport to Cardiff

    At 00:58 they took it do deep - you've got the keep the bow up and the boat moving. Once a hull breaks loose and starts surfing on a wave, you are basically riding the wave crest. On many boats you will simply maintain course while surfing and then head up a bit after the crest passes to set up for the next wave. On faster boats like the VOR 65, it appears that the driver wants to head up a bit while surfing to make up for the loss of apparent wind speed and to keep the boat surfing longer. The best autopilots now automatically scull waves as they steer the boat through heavy seas. The best drivers do exactly the same thing - they feel the boat under them as they steer and instinctively scull the waves, whether they are conscious of what they are doing or not. Even if you are not a naturally talented driver, you can learn to do this with a bit of practice. When steering in large waves, body position is particularly important. You need to find a posture in which you can both comfortably grasp the wheel or tiller and can easily feel how the boat is moving under you. This is largely subjective and different people steer better in different positions. Some people can feel a boat easily through their butts and can sit while steering; many more feel a boat best while standing with their legs spread wide. Compromise positions, where you sit with one leg braced against a foot rest, can also be effective. Sailing off the wind, as a wave crest approaches the stern of the boat, you should bear away a bit, and once the crest is past you should head up. The end result at the wave crest the boat is depowered, with the bow or stern closer to the eye of the wind. Heading down into the trough the apparent wind angle is increased and the boat is more powered up. Sailing off the wind, it keeps the hull flatter as the wave crests approach, reduces torsional twist on the stern that can lead to a broach, and sets the boat up to surf down the front of the wave. Powering up the boat as it heads into the troughs in most cases increases control and speed, so you can avoid stuffing a wave negotiate the next wave crest as it approaches.