allene222

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About allene222

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    SF Bay

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  1. allene222

    A big project!

    Having that shop and land is priceless.
  2. allene222

    A big project!

    Freda is 32 feet and built in 1885. Restored by Spaulding Boat Works using their student's labor it still cost $500,000 and took 5 years. Tally Ho is newer and larger at 48 feet according to Wikipedia. That would scale her as 3.4 times larger by volume. If everything scales, it will take 17 years and about $2,000,000. Leo has 30 videos up and gets revenue from Google for those The web says you earn $2000 per million viewers and he has 30 videos up and they seem to be about 200k views each so roughly 6 million views or $12,000 from ads. That might cover 10% of his costs. I have a couple of videos in the same order of magnitude and those numbers seem believable. I assume his donors are much more important.
  3. allene222

    A big project!

    A boat that size would probably require permits the entire way. She is 12 feet wide so would require two lanes. Very expensive I would guess. Better to put it on a ship imho. But I agree, I think it will either be in mint condition before it leaves WA, or he gives up.
  4. allene222

    A big project!

    He has so much if the boat that he plans on reusing sitting there in Was that I can't see how he can do that.
  5. allene222

    A big project!

    Has anyone done an estimate of how long this will take Leo to finish? It has been about 16 months. Is he 10% finished? Western Flyer said their restoration will cost $2 million. Is that like 20 man years? I know Leo wants a crew as he has probably done this calculation. Looks like he typically has help so that is good. Freda took 5 years and $500,000 but Tally Ho is an order of magnitude bigger project. Just trying to get a handle on the scale of this project. Really interesting to watch. I wish him the best in his efforts. Personally I am almost overwhelmed just trying to keep paint on my boat not to mention trying to figure out where the damn rain water is getting in. You have to be crazy to own a wood boat.
  6. allene222

    Dyneema Stretch

    The New England rope heat stretched looked pretty good. I have a lot of faith in them as well. It was true 7mm after the stretch so had a higher strength rating. Colligo starts with 7mm and it shrinks when stretched which I guess explains its lower strength rating. The NE Rope 7mm fit so all was good.
  7. allene222

    Dyneema Stretch

    After a lot of thinking and reading I decided on a simple eye splice locked with a brummel. I used a short splice after the brummel, as short as 25 diameters (7 inches) on one end. According to the famous @estarzinger rope strength thread on page 3 a brummel alone is about 50% of line strength with no bury. Also, a short 18 diameter bruy slipped at just over 40% of line strength and a 27 diameter bury was very strong. As I only need 30% of line strength to have a 5x safety factor, either a brummel alone or the splice without the brummel would have been enough. The combination should be fine. It is hard to read through the 15 pages of posts on that testing page but I wanted to have something that had some data behind it. By the way, this Heat Set STS 7mm from New England rope is very stiff. It is nothing like the Amsteel I tried to pre stretch. A clear indication that I did not give the line enough prestretch tension as was mentioned above. The next thing I need to do is get the halyard tight and adjust the luff tension with the lashings that are there. I set it lose initially. I don't think a tight luff is important or even desirable in light winds. What is important is a straight one. But I guess it depends on how they cut the sail. We shall see.
  8. allene222

    Dyneema Stretch

    I am designing for 1000 pounds on the halyard. I would like to run with less than that if the wind is light but the system, winch power, turning block, masthead sheaves, are all sized for that. The reality is I could just take a more stretchy line and adjust the attachment so that the sail is happy when the line has stretched to its load but what I came to in my thinking was that the extra $100 for the heat set line was a small price to pay to get what people smarter than I said I needed. I will still have the task of deciding how tight to make the sail when the halyard is tight but as I see it, this is like deciding how tight to make the halyard when the forestay is tight. In that case, forestay tension is a first order effect and halyard tension a second order effect. By the way, we blew up and bent a couple of cheek blocks before Garhauer made this 2 pound monster all steel cheek block for us. Here is a link to the video of the first block exploding. Crew was up there trying to find what was causing the noise when it finally went. It also ripped the fairlead block off the cabin top. The cockpit was full of ball bearings and we never found the sheive. Could have killed someone.
  9. allene222

    Dyneema Stretch

    This was just a test splice and I would taper it a bit but just for cosmetic reasons. The line is rated at something like 16,000 pounds and I am targeting 1,000 load so even with a big safety factor I only need 30% of line strength. That is why I was thinking of using a water bowline which would be 50%. But in my trial I ended up with this end of rope hanging out below the tack which looked bad and might get tangled on something at an inopportune time. The thing I don't like about this splice is that it is so fat. There are several options for the splice near the tack, this being one, so I just have to pick one. The splice at the head will be above the ring so there will be plenty of room for the taper. And I could still use a knot at the tack but at this point I am thinking I will just use a splice of some kind.
  10. allene222

    Dyneema Stretch

    I ordered the Heat Set 7mm New England Rope STS line today. I also put the sail up with the Amsteel I tried to pre stretch. The bowline idea was not a good one so I guess I will just do what Harry told me to do. I am grateful to him for his help even in the face of my not being a customer for this sail. He did make the red and white spinnaker shown in my photo.
  11. allene222

    Modern wiring standards

    Wire is significantly cheaper if you buy 100 feet and connectors are cheaper in bulk. Standardizing on a single size will save you more money than using a variety of wire sizes to use the smallest for every circuit. As far as wright savings goes, sizing up will probably cost you less than the weight of one beer. I know some boats do not allow beer because of its weight and if that is your boat, by all means go for the smaller wire. That said, I would expect a professional to use different colors and different sizes when wiring a boat so I will admit that what I did was not professional. I also did not actually use #10 wire everywhere as I bought some cables for some of the long runs for example to the blower and the pumps. They were sized for their load. Most of the #10 went to wiring the engine, alternator, starter solenoid, ignition coil, and fuse panel.
  12. allene222

    Modern wiring standards

    wtf? Here is a nice article with a link to a table that recommends wire size. https://www.westmarine.com/WestAdvisor/Marine-Wire-Terminal-Tech-Specs They recommend using the 3% table for all wiring but if you have a feather weight boat, perhaps the 10% table can save you several ounces.
  13. allene222

    A big project!

    OMG. You reminded me of the Mini with a Olds V8 in it that I drove in the 60's.
  14. allene222

    Modern wiring standards

    Take 6 pennies and arrange them in a circle. Then place a 7th in the center. That is the arrangement of most flexable wire sold. But in marine use, all the wire is made for extreme flexibility so almost regardless of the gauge, are made up of a various number of the same fine strand wire. The fatter the wire, the more strands unlike house wire that is always 7 strand. Marine wire is also rated for higher temperatures than house wire. I personally see very little reason to use a smaller gauge wire even if it might not be necessary. On Papoose, I just bought a spool of 10 gauge wire and used it everywhere. It was white and I used marking pens to color code it. Obviously better to use different colors but that is not what I did. As has been said, wire should be rated for the voltage drop that is acceptable for the application. I take a bit of issue with ignoring transients as these might be starter currents and might be where delivering the required voltage is most important. Allen
  15. allene222

    Dyneema Stretch

    Geeze. I wouldn't want you to have the heebie jeebies on my account. I have changed my plan once again and will use a conventional brummel splice at the head and a waterbowine around the ring at the tack. Nothing inventive so you can calm down. I find in Estar's testing that a water bowline does not slip in Dyneema and that will allow for easy adjustment. Feel better? I am going to use NEW ENGLAND ROPES STS-HSR Heat-Set 7mm Dia. Dyneema Single Braid unless someone can talk me out of it before tomorrow when I plan on placing the order..